Villa meet Derby in playoff battle for £170 million prize

first_imgAston Villa face Derby County in the Championship playoff final on Monday with both clubs desperate for a return to the Premier League in a game billed as the richest in world football with at least 170 million pounds ($216.19 million) on the line.Villa have been out of the top flight for three seasons while Derby have been stuck in the second tier of English football since relegation in 2008.A 10-match winning streak during the run-in propelled Dean Smith’s Villa side into the playoffs where they got past West Midlands rivals West Bromwich Albion.“The key thing is momentum,” said former Brentford manager Smith, who took over from Steve Bruce at Villa Park in October.“I feel we have a lot of that going into it (the final), given our run towards the end of the season and our two dominant playoff games, We can take it into the final.”Derby produced a brilliant performance with a 4-2 win over Leeds United in their playoff second leg at Elland Road earning them a place at Wembley.Derby manager Frank Lampard, the former Chelsea and England midfielder who is in his first season as a manager, believes his team are well suited for the high-pressure encounter.“The ‘cup’ football feeling has been good for us. We’ve had to get results for a while now, going back to probably the QPR game (a 2-0 home win on April 22). We’ll need big game mentality on Monday,” he said.Lampard is up against his former club and international team mate John Terry, who is Smith’s assistant at Villa.PROUD HISTORIESThe two clubs have proud histories. Seven-times English champions Villa were European Cup winners in 1982, while Derby were twice English champions in the 1970s.Champions Norwich City and runners-up Sheffield United have already secured promotion to the top flight and the rewards for Villa and Derby of joining them are eye-watering.According to analysis from Deloitte’s Sports Business Group, promotion will bring an increase in revenue of at least 170 million pounds, rising to a minimum of 300 million if the playoff winners avoid relegation in their first season.The 170 million includes 95 million pounds in revenue from playing in the Premier League in 2019/20, mostly from broadcast and commercial revenue, and a total of 75 million in parachute payments in 2020/21 and 2021/22 if they go straight down.However, the 170 million rises to at least 300 million if they survive their first season in the top flight.last_img read more

Pochettino unconcerned over shortage of right-backs

first_imgTottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino is not concerned about his shortage of right-backs ahead of Sunday’s north London derby at Arsenal.Spurs are without Kyle Walker-Peters and Juan Foyth, while possible makeshift replacement Eric Dier is struggling with a hip injury and is a doubt for the Emirates clash.That leaves just Serge Aurier as the only recognised right-back but he has not featured since injuring himself playing for the Ivory Coast in the summer’s Africa Cup of Nations.Midfielder Moussa Sissoko is another possibility but – with Tanguy Ndombele’s injury – he is likely to be needed in the middle of the park.It highlights Pochettino’s decision not to strengthen his squad in that area following the sale of Kieran Trippier to Atletico Madrid, but the manager is not worried.“It’s not a worry, only an issue we need to fix – try to find another solution,” he said. “I am very optimistic that we will find the best way to perform. There’s no excuses.“Always when one option disappears there is another option that appears and we will play with 11 players, from the beginning, eh?”Dele Alli is unlikely to be be one of those 11 players but he could be on the bench after a recent hamstring injury.“Dele got injured in the Audi Cup and we need to assess him on Saturday,” Pochettino added. “Maybe he will be involved in the squad. It’s not certain. We need to assess.“He’s got one training session more. He’s doing well but still we need to assess him. I cannot say if he’s 50-50, 80-20, 20-80 – I don’t know. We need to see on Saturday and take the decision.”Spurs’ trip across north London comes at a time where Pochettino’s future has come under scrutiny after the 1-0 defeat to Newcastle last weekend.And the Argentinian thinks it is a good game for his side to try to bounce back in.“Always you need to win,” he said. “If you came from a not good result like we did, you need to win. If you came from a good result you need to win again.“The criticism in football comes when you don’t win. It’s not important what happened in the past, only what happens now, in the present.“We know well what this game means. I’m lucky to be involved in this type of game. I love to play this type of game and I am so excited and optimistic that we will perform in our best way.”last_img read more

Saving an island from the worst oil spill in the Philippines: The case of Guimaras

first_imgOn August 11, 2006, the oil tanker M/T Solar 1, hired by Petron Corporation, sank off the coast of Guimaras, an island province in the Philippines, spilling more than 2.1 million liters (about 555,000 gallons) of bunker fuel. It is still known as the worst oil spill in the Philippines’ history.The oil that contaminated the water was not only devastating for the environment but also for the people and the economy of Guimaras.Thirteen years later, Guimaras once again boasts pristine beaches with white sand and the fisherfolks have returned to harvesting the abundance of the waters. On August 11, 2006, the oil tanker M/T Solar 1, hired by Petron Corporation, sank off the coast of Guimaras, an island province in the Philippines, spilling more than 2.1 million liters (about 555,000 gallons) of bunker fuel. It is still known as the worst oil spill in the Philippines’ history. The oil that contaminated the water was not only devastating for the environment but also for the people and the economy of Guimaras.“I was shocked to see dead fishes floating in the water. Then, there was oil all over the place,” Jean Gajo, a local fisherman who doubles as a tour guide, said while pointing to the beach and waters that are now once again white and blue. But after the spill, the island and sea had been painted black.According to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), the crisis affected 1,500 hectares (more than 3,700 acres) of the local ecosystem comprised of mangroves, seagrass, and coral reefs.Among the affected areas, Taklong Island Marine Natural Reserve (TINMR), a national marine sanctuary and protected area, was the hardest hit. TINMR serves as breeding grounds for various fish species that are caught outside its boundary. Because the water was contaminated, a full stop on fishing was implemented, putting an end to the only livelihood that 20,000 fisherfolks had known for decades. Tourism, another economic driver of the island, was also temporarily banned while the clean-up was ongoing. Guimaras lost billions of pesos. The tragic event demanded long-term rehabilitation if the island was to recover.The Taklong Island National Marine Reserve was severely damaged. This bird was rescued in one of the mangroves being cleaned up. Photo by Shubert Ciencia, licensed under CC BY 2.0.Various international non-profit organizations, government agencies, and academic institutions collaborated in responding to the crisis. These agencies included the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the International Maritime Organization (IMO), Greenpeace, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), DENR, the Philippines’ Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR), and the University of the Philippines Visayas (UPV), among others.Thirteen years later, Guimaras once again boasts pristine beaches with white sand; TINMR is crowned as “the Jewel of Guimaras”; and the fisherfolks have returned to harvesting the abundance of the waters.Cleaning up the oilNOAA’s comprehensive guide to oil spill strategies includes booming, skimming, barriers/berms, physical herding, manual oil removal/cleaning, mechanical oil removal, sorbents, vacuum, debris removal, sediment reworking/tilling, and in situ burning, among other activities. However, the responses depend mainly on various factors, such as the amount of oil involved, the type and quality of oil, the conditions prevailing in the area, and where the incident happened. The responses need to be science-based in order to minimize the possible negative impacts, like soil erosion and environmental contamination.The locals immediately attempted to contain the oil after the spill. Bayanihan, a Filipino concept of helping each other, emerged from the crisis.“At first, it was just the local villagers who were soaking up the oil,” Gajo said. But as soon as the news of the spill spread, people came to volunteer in the cleanup.Because TINMR was in a remote area where the roads were not yet cemented, mechanical removal using heavy equipment was not possible, so the community had to clean the spill site manually.Initially, the responders used human hair to create a boom to contain the oil. There was a national campaign asking for hair, an effective oil absorbent. Beauty salons and barbershops from different parts of the country collected cut hair and sent them to Guimaras. However, the use of human hair was eventually discouraged.“It has a slow degradation. It’s also hard to retrieve when it goes into the environment. Human hair may have been exposed to chemicals used at parlors, too. It may end up only as a pollutant,” explained Dr. Resurrecion B. Sadaba, who manages the University of the Philippines Visayas Oil Spill Response Program (UPV-OSRP), created to address the cleanup and serve as the repository of research data used in evaluating the rehabilitation and recovery of the island.Oil spill cleanup in Barangay La Paz, Nueva Valencia, Guimaras. Photo by Shubert Ciencia, licensed under CC BY 2.0.The responders instead began making artisan booms out of bamboos, rattan, leaves, coconut husks, and rice straw, among other natural materials found in the surrounding area. The artisan booms were placed along the beaches to hold the oil back.The oil that had reached the shoreline was removed by physical wiping with the use of commercial sorbent pads. The hard-to-remove oil was left to degrade naturally.Cleanup at sea was conducted by the Philippine Coast Guards (PCG), Petron Corporation, and foreign assistance, mainly using oil spill dispersants (OSDs). According to the Oil Spill Prevention Response, OSDs serve as a cleaner, removing the oil from the water surface and breaking them down into smaller particles, which biodegrade more quickly and easily.Contracted by the company that had insured the Solar 1 and using a ship designed for oil spill recovery, Sonsub, an Italian oil and gas company, recovered the remaining oil from the sunken vessel that lay 640 meters (about 2,100 feet) underwater.Two remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) deployed underwater and monitored by robotic cameras drilled two holes in each of the 10 sunken cargo containers. One hole was used to introduce water into the tank, pushing the oil out to the second hole that was connected to a shuttle container. The operation continued 24 hours a day, seven days a week during the recovery. After 21 days, a total of 9 cubic meters (about 9000 liters) of oil was recovered.The shoreline and at-sea cleanup lasted for a year. Responders collected an estimated 282,000 bags (about 2,100 tons) of natural materials used for the spill booms and recovered oil, which were used as an alternative fuel for cement processing in Mindanao.Mangroves and seagrassA report shows that the province of Guimaras estimated a total of 648.98 hectares of mangroves forests were affected. Some 469.18 hectares were heavily oiled, while the remaining 179.8 hectares were slightly covered. Three months after the oil spill, 0.93 hectares of mangroves died.Sadaba says that natural recovery is most appropriate for oil spill cleanup in mangrove forests. OSDs or chemical cleaners must not be used directly in mangroves and surrounding sediments because they may contain chemical components that are toxic to mangrove fauna. “Best action is no action at all. Let nature recover by itself. It’s biodegradation. It’s faster. It’s safer,” he emphasized.Sadaba noted that, based on his experience from the Semirara Antique oil spill, which happened a few months before the Guimaras oil spill, the responders who went inside the mangrove forests to contain the oil probably stepped on the mangroves, doing more harm than good.Replanted mangroves. Photo courtesy of Arnel Murga.Together with another UPV-OSRP scientist, Dr. Abner Barnuevo, Sadaba published a study that showed various mangroves had experienced structural changes, albinism, and other abnormalities. The structural changes, such as a decrease in leaf size and stunted growth, were attributed to the oil spill.“Mangrove recovery is based on the tree’s normal functions, such as flowering, fruiting, and growing of the seedlings,” Sadaba said. “In 2014, the mangroves have started exhibiting their normal functions. It’s a sign of recovery.”University of the Philippines Marine Biological Station (UPV-MBS) head Prof. Marie Frances Nievales studied the situation of another vital part of the marine ecosystem: seagrass. Seagrass meadows, which serve as breeding and nursing grounds for a variety of marine fauna, are an indicator of marine and coastal ecosystems’ health. Also, like the mangroves, seagrass minimizes soil erosion and helps protect coastlines against typhoons and rising tides.In her study, Prof. Nievales found structural changes in the seagrass of TINMR, including a decrease in seagrass cover and shoot density.“Seagrass provides economic and ecological services. But these were hampered by the oil spill,” Nievales said. “We also noticed that sea cucumbers in the seagrass meadows were depleting. We did a stock replenishing of sea cucumbers.”Continuing research for rehabilitation and reconstructionThe cleanup did not stop after the visible oil was gone. The OSDs and other factors such as tidal activity and temperature had broken the oil down into smaller particles in the water and sediment. Aside from being highly insoluble in water, these smaller particles of oil were left for microorganisms to be utilized as sources of carbon and energy. This is biodegradation.“Continuous monitoring of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) level in the water was conducted,” Sadaba noted. PAHs are carcinogenic to humans and an indicator of the presence of oil. Therefore, PAH levels in the contaminated area have been closely monitored. It took three years before PAHs went down to a safe level according to the acceptable standard set by NOAA.Dr. Terence P.N. Talorete, a Japan-based Filipino research scientist, suggested the use of bioremediation, a process that speeds up biodegradation. Bioremediation is “the act of adding materials to the contaminated environments to cause acceleration of the natural biodegradation process,” Tolorete said.The key to this process is the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria that feed on the heavy oil, which are introduced to an environment contaminated by a spill. When the oil is gone, the bacteria die naturally without harming the environment. Biodegradation with remediation has been applied in the two worst oil spills in U.S. history, namely the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 and the BP disaster and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. However, bioremediation has not been applied in the Guimaras oil spill because further studies were needed.In the context of the Philippines, bioremediation has been done only in laboratory setups. However, Sadaba and Dekota, a Czech Republic-based environmental research company, have recommended that bioremediation be included in the country’s National Oil Spill Contingency Plan.Though the UPV-OSRP was initially commissioned for five years, Sadaba was able to extend it to seven due to the need to monitor the recovery of the island.“The oil spill response program must be institutionalized,” Sadaba said. In the Philippines, there has been an increasing number of oil spill crises. However, there is no existing agency that addresses such concerns. “In every oil spill, the solution differs in each case. But there are patterns. There are good practices that can be replicated.”He also said that the institutionalization of UPV-OSRP will lessen the country’s expenses in addressing oil spill issues. At present, responses to those issues are primarily sought from consultants hired abroad.Strengthening coastal management and protection, empowering local communitiesWith marine resources contaminated, fisherfolk lost their livelihood. Their daily means of survival were put at risk. To address this, coastal families earned incomes through cash-for-work programs such as the oil clean-up and mangrove planting. DENR provided training on tour guiding, souvenir making, catering, and t-shirt printing, among other activities that could provide alternative livelihoods to local community members.“It is helpful. Because even right now, I still use the skill that I got from the training,” said Lily Galabo, one of the beneficiaries of the livelihood program. At present, Guimaras is strengthening its ecotourism, in which the skills provided are useful.In 2007, the government of Guimaras sought the help of Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA) in implementing international coastal management (ICM), a natural resource and environmental management framework for managing issues in coastal areas.“The island now has a comprehensive plan on coastal management and protection, ecotourism, and active members,” Rhett Arthur Diana, TINMR protected area superintendent, said.Government agencies and local community members worked together in implementing the ICM. Local government units (LGUs) provide financial support to marine conservation and law enforcement activities, while DENR, the executive department responsible for overseeing the welfare of the country’s natural resources, partners with local communities.The ICM takes a “ridge-to-reef” approach, protecting the forest up to the reef. An intensified information campaign has been launched to educate not only the locals but also the tourists. Strict enforcement of maritime laws was implemented, wherein mechanisms were established to ensure environmental protection.“During the oil spill, some water animals had disappeared. There was silence. You could not hear the chirping of the birds or any other sounds of animals,” said Diana, who documented the mangroves during the rapid assessment. “Now, there are sightings of monitor lizards, water birds like egrets, mudskippers, etc.”Before the oil spill, there was a lack of data on the fauna on the island, and without baseline data it was difficult to establish the oil spill’s effect on local fauna. Because of the ICM, Guimaras now has a list of both flora and fauna on the island.“I used to cut down mangrove trees for firewood purposes,” Nard Labado confessed. “I didn’t know about their importance. Now, as a fisherman and resident of a coastal area, I help in mangrove planting and educate my children about the importance of the environment.”As a member of PEMSEA, Guimaras releases “State of the Coast,” a reporting system developed primarily to present the progress and impacts of ICM implementation. Because of this, PEMSEA considers Guimaras a model for sustainable development and coastal management in the East Asian Seas Region.Eventually, Guimaras won the 2017 Para El Mar (For the Seas) competition. It arose as champion of the National Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS) category, a Marine Protected Areas Support Network annual recognition of best practices in the effective management and science-based governance of marine-protected areas.DENR trained and educated the local community members on environmental protection and conservation. After the training, they have started planting mangroves and reported suspected poaching and other illegal fishing activities on the island. Equipped with the training provided, they now serve as guardians of the island, making sure that oil spills or any other environmental crises will not happen.Small hidden beach on Guimaras. Photo by Mats Sjödin, licensed under CC BY 3.0.CITATIONS• Abner P. Barnuevo and Resurreccion B. Sadaba (2014) Recovery of mangrove deforested areas from M/T Solar oil spill in Guimaras, Philippines. International Oil Spill Conference Proceedings: May 2014, Vol. 2014, No. 1, pp. 2260-2272. doi:10.7901/2169-3358-2014.1.2260• Atlas, R. M., & Hazen, T. C. (2011). Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: a tale of the two worst spills in US history. doi:10.1021/es2013227• Barnuevo, A. P., & Sadaba, R. B. (2014, May). Recovery of mangrove deforested areas from M/T Solar oil spill in Guimaras, Philippines. In International Oil Spill Conference Proceedings (Vol. 2014, No. 1, pp. 2260-2272). American Petroleum Institute. doi:10.7901/2169-3358-2014.1.2260• Chua, T.-E. 2008. Coastal Governance: a Reflection of Integrated Coastal Management Initiatives with Special Reference to the East Asian Seas Region, pp. 371–402. In: Chua T.-E., G. Kullenberg and D. Bonga (eds.). Securing the Oceans: Essays on Ocean Governance – Global and Regional Perspectives. Global Environmental Facility/United Nations Development Programme/International Maritime Organization Regional Programme on Building Partnerships in Environmental Management for the Seas of East Asia and the Nippon Foundation, Quezon City, Philippines.• Hoff, R. Z. (1993). Bioremediation: an overview of its development and use for oil spill cleanup. Marine pollution bulletin, 26(9), 476-481. doi:10.1016/0025-326X(93)90463-T• Nievales, M., & Frances, J. (2009). Some structural changes of seagrass meadows in Taklong Island National Marine Reserve, Guimaras, western Visayas Philippines after an oil spill. doi:10.5134/144631• OTA, 1991. Bioremediation of Marine Oil Spills and Analysis of Oil Spill Response Technologies. Office of Technology Assessment, Washington DC.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Community-based Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Coral Reefs, Ecotourism, Environment, Mangroves, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Oil, Oil Spills, Research, Seagrass center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Dorsal de Nasca: Peru pledges to create a huge new marine reserve

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazar This story was first published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on Nov. 7, 2019. Banner image: The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is one of 12 commecially important species in the proposed Dorsal de Nasca reserve. Image by Mark Conlin/NOAA SWFSC Large Pelagics Program via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).center_img In October, Peru’s environment minister pledged to make a proposed 50,000-square-kilometer (19,300-square-mile) marine protected area a reality by 2021.The proposed protected area, called the Dorsal de Nasca National Reserve, comprises part of a range of 93 submarine mountains that harbor more than 1,100 species, many of them endemic.If it is approved, it will bring the proportion of the country’s territorial waters that are protected from just 0.48% to 6.5%.While supporting the new proposed reserve, marine experts continue to push for the establishment of the Grau Tropical Marine Reserve in the country’s north, over pushback from the oil and gas industry. Under the sea, jutting into the Pacific from the southern Peruvian department of Ica, rises a mountain range called Dorsal de Nasca. The 93 submarine mountains harbor more than 1,100 species, many of them endemic, and a section of the range has become the latest marine protected area proposed by the Peruvian government.The country’s minister of the environment, Fabiola Muñoz, made a firm promise to designate more than 50,000 square kilometers (19,300 square miles) of this underwater mountain range as a protected natural area during the III Congress of Protected Natural Areas of Latin America and the Caribbean, held in Lima in mid-October 2019. The protected area, called Dorsal de Nasca National Reserve, would be located 140 km (76 nautical miles) off the Peruvian coast.According to the proposed marine reserve’s constitutional documents, Dorsal de Nasca would allow Peru to jump from protecting just 0.48% of its territorial waters to 6.5%, carrying the country closer to its commitment to bring at least 10% of its ocean under some form of protection.Protection would prevent the government from granting any marine concessions within the area. Trawling by large fishing vessels, which can damage underwater habitat, is already prohibited, but fishing by other methods would continue.Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) live in and around the proposed Dorsal de Nasca reserve. Image courtesy of Oceana.An underwater mountain rangeDorsal de Nasca will be the largest protected area and the first underwater mountain range to be protected in Peru, according to Alicia Kuroiwa, director of habitats and endangered species for the international marine conservation NGO Oceana in Peru. Kuroiwa was part of the team that prepared the reserve’s constitutional documents.She drew a parallel between the Dorsal de Nasca and the Andes mountain ranges, saying that both act as highways for the movement of species. “There is a sea lion that only lives on Easter Island, it never reaches the coast of Chile, but does reach Punta Marcona in Peru, because the mountain range helps to guide it to our coasts,” Kuroiwa told Mongabay Latam.Southern species such as southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) and emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) have also appeared in Punta Marcona, located about 480 km (300 mi) northwest of the Chilean border. “These animals travel from south to north and when they find the mountain range they follow this path,” Kuroiwa said.The Dorsal de Nasca ridge butts into another ridge, called Dorsal de Salas y Gómez. Together the two chains of volcanic underwater mountains extend for 2,900 km (1,570 nmi) off the coasts of Peru and Chile. Formed over approximately 30 million years, the mountains reach a depth of 4,000 meters (more than 13,000 feet).Yuri Hooker, a biologist at the Marine Biology Laboratory of Cayetano Heredia University in Lima, said studies are still needed to really understand this marine area delineated by the mountains. “Potentially the area may have high biodiversity, but the truth is that not much is known about this place,” Hooker said.The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) passes through the area of the proposed reserve. Image by Gudkov Andrey via Shutterstock.Hooker said he believes it is necessary to create the Dorsal de Nasca reserve. However, he pointed out that the government has yet to protect some better-studied marine areas known to have high biodiversity and endemism. As a prime example he mentioned Peru’s northern waters, where the Grau Tropical Marine Reserve, four areas totalling almost 1,160 km2 (450 mi2) was first proposed back in 2011. “More than 70% of the biodiversity of the entire Peruvian sea is concentrated on a small coastline of 150 kilometers,” or 80 miles, said Hooker.Hooker also mentioned other priority ecosystems, including a ridge off northern Peru and coastal areas of the department of Arequipa, in southern Peru. “Ideally, many marine protected areas will be created, including the Dorsal de Nasca and those mentioned above, but what should not happen is to ignore areas that are probably biodiverse but more complex to manage only to establish other remote, deep and inaccessible areas for the sole purpose of achieving a percentage of protected oceans,” he said.The fear is that the establishment of the Grau Tropical Marine Reserve, which faces opposition from the oil and gas sector, will be put to one side because of existing oil concessions in the area.“It’s a political decision,” Kuroiwa said about the delays in establishing the Grau Tropical Marine Reserve. “It has been before the Council of Ministers for two years and so far it has not been approved.”Cold-water corals, including this cockscomb cup coral (Desmophyllum dianthus), live in the depths of the proposed Dorsal de Nasca reserve. Image courtesy of Oceana.A reserve on the wayAccording to the Dorsal de Nasca reserve’s constitutional documents, scientists have documented 1,116 species around the Dorsal de Nasca and Dorsal de Salas y Gómez ridges. Thirty of them are regarded as being in danger of or vulnerable to extinction, such as the blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) and the leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). An estimated 41% of the area’s fish species and 46% of the invertebrates are endemic. It is home to deep-sea species such as cold-water corals and cod, that are considered vulnerable. Some migratory species like the humpback whale pass through the area.Cold-water corals. The proposed Dorsal de Nasca reserve would cover more than 50,000 square kilometers (19,300 square miles) of Peru’s territorial waters. Image courtesy of Oceana.Commercial species also pass through the area: squid, deep-sea cod, perico and sharks. According to the constitutional documents, 12 commercially important species are fished in the area.Pedro Gamboa, head of the National Service of Natural Protected Areas (SERNANP), said the proposal for the Dorsal de Nasca reserve’s establishment was developed with the intention of representing as many of Peru’s marine ecosystems as possible.The process of establishing the reserve is in the consultation stage, and all the stakeholders are involved, according to Gamboa. Once a consensus among the sectors has been achieved, it will be submitted for approval to the Council of Ministers, the Peruvian cabinet. “The goal is to have the two reserves approved simultaneously,” he said, referring to the Dorsal de Nasca National Reserve and Grau Tropical Marine Reserve.Gamboa acknowledged that the oil concessions in the north are a stumbling block for the Grau Tropical Marine Reserve. But he said he hopes this impasse will be overcome and the Peruvian government will be able to fulfill the commitment the environment minister made in October, which was to establish both reserves by 2021.Joanna Alfaro, a marine biologist and president of the Peruvian nonprofit Pro Delphinus, who contributed to the Dorsal de Nasca proposal, said the main stakeholders now being consulted are the fishers who visit the area to catch commercially important species such as squid and perico. “There is industrial and artisanal fishing activity,” she said.Satellite image of the proposed Dorsal de Nasca reserve. Image courtesy of Global Fishing Watch.Illegal fishing is the main threat to the area, according to Kuroiwa of Oceana. Trawling is not permitted there, but large vessels are able to enter to carry out this activity in an unauthorized manner.One of the actions to protect the reserve will be satellite monitoring through Global Fishing Watch, a service that allows real-time monitoring of fishing vessels. Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Protected Areas last_img read more

Need for public order overdue

first_imgDear Editor,The Mayor and City Council had, earlier this year, cited their intent to reintroduce zoning in the City of Georgetown. To me, that is an unenviable task and a valiant effort to restore order within the capital city. Guyanese at home and abroad like to boast and impress others about their visits to other cities in the world, where public order is evident.It is obvious that such developments did not occur in those countries by mere wishes; so it is timely that we move beyond admiration of others and seek to realize similar standards at home.The need for public order is indeed overdue, and is something that zoning can ably correct. It will require massive adjustments, and may not be as easily attainable, unless the citizenry and business community fully comprehend and endorse the M&CC’s ultimate objectives.What the M&CC should consider, however, is the mood and intellect of citizens as this entity pursues this initiative. We do not need another ‘Parking Meter’ type fiasco.There is a whole new generation of citizens who seem out of touch with internationally acceptable norms and modern urban standards.Some do not even understand what a residential area is. I can say so unreservedly because, in almost any area, one can find people placing large sound systems in their vehicles or on their verandas to blast off melodies at decibels that would literally crack the walls of neighbouring buildings, not to mention the ears and chests of living creatures within proximity of the cacophony.With a generation that seems to enjoy the free-for-all of living however and wherever, without the basic recognition or regard for such areas as “silent zones” – honking their vehicle horns near hospitals and courts of judicature, or playing music carts near churches and schools – the efficacy of zoning by-laws would be more than welcome.It will, however, require consistency in its implementation, and effective policing to ensure that there is public adherence to relevant by-laws.The M&CC would therefore need to embark on mammoth public consultation and education. They must also ensure that zoning implementation does not create undue contentions or violation of property rights.The M&CC, through their twinning and collaborative relations with other Cities, can present ‘Best Practices’ as ‘buy-ins’ to posit their initiative for zoning, and create awareness of the benefits associated with such standards.Zoning will not only restore order and civility within the capital, but will, by extension, be the catalyst for urban expansion, with the creation of new industrial areas, particularly for those types of businesses that present environmental and safety hazards within traditional residential areas, or those that may need to be relocated for violation of operational regulations within the City.Sincerely,Orette Cuttinglast_img read more

Pregnant Dominican fined for immigration fraud

first_imgYasbel Benitez from the Dominican Republic was on Wednesday slapped with two immigration fraud charges, and appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts.The first charge, which was read by city Magistrate Fabayo Azore via a translator, stated that Benitez between May 13, 2016 and December 20, 2016 in the city of Georgetown, with intent to defraud, conspired with person/s to forge one Guyana immigration service stamp in her Dominican Republic passport, purporting to show that same had been issued by the Guyana Immigration Department.In addition, the woman on April 13, 2017, uttered to an Immigration officer one Dominican Republic passport in favour of herself, with one forged immigration service stamp endorsed to show that it was issued by the Immigration Department of Guyana, knowing same to be forged.Police Prosecutor Simone Payne told the court that the woman entered Guyana legally via the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) on February 2, 2017, and was granted a one-month stay in the country. She later applied for an extension and it was upon confirmation of such, that it was discovered that her previous extension of stay in 2016, was forged and not issued by local immigration authorities.The pregnant woman admitted to both charges and was slapped with a $100,000 fine for each offence. Failure to pay the fine will result in six months’ imprisonment.last_img read more

White paper for improving country’s drainage

first_imgA committee comprising personnel from the ministries of Communities, Agriculture, and Public Infrastructure are currently working on recommendations to craft a ‘white paper’ that would aid in addressing the critical drainage issues throughout Guyana.Communities Minister Ronald Bulkan has said that, six weeks ago, the President entrusted the three government ministries to craft this white paper, since the issue of drainage has become a critical one across Guyana.The committee has already started working; and, so far, a preliminary paper has been prepared by the National Drainage and Irrigation Authority (NDIA). Several options are listed therein, including an expanded role for the NDIA.Minister Bulkan notes that this initiative is necessary, since Regional Democratic Councils (RDC), Neighbourhood Democratic Councils (NDC), and municipalities do not have the capacity, and are challenged to effectively manage drainage in their respective areas.“I engaged all the RDCs, putting the policy paper before them and inviting their responses to the actions, and all of them favoured this recommendation. And it is clear (that they favour this recommendation) because they recognise they don’t have the technical skills, capacity, resources and machinery to otherwise address the drainage in their regions,” Bulkan said.Minister Bulkan noted that the RDCs, NDCs and Municipalities’ lack of resources is resulting in hardship and misery for many people, especially when there is severe flooding and no systems are in place to deal with it. He emphasised that the option recommended is one that would allow for an expanded role for a central authority, to be properly resourced by the Central Government to discharge this responsibility.Several communities, including communities along the Pomeroon River and communities in regions Six, Seven and Eight, have experienced severe flooding. This resulted in destruction of homes, farmlands and other livelihoods.Minister Bulkan has said that Government is working assiduously to ensure that this chronic drainage issue is resolved and flooding is a thing of past.A white paper is an authoritative report or guide that informs concisely about a complex issue. It is meant to create understanding about an issue, solve a problem, or make a decision.last_img read more

DONEGAL SCIENTIST CONQUERS ANTARCTICA WITH AMAZING BALLOON RECORD

first_imgThe Super Tiger Balloon getting ready for its releaseA scientist from Glenties has set a new NASA long duration balloon record in Antarctica today.Dr. John E Ward, an Astrophysicist at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, has been in Antarctica since October getting ready for the record attempt.Dr. Ward is part of a NASA research project called Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder), a two-ton machine that collects cosmic-ray particles at the top of the atmosphere. The Northern lights, which were visible in Donegal last year, are made by cosmic rays colliding with the earth’s magnetic field.Dr Ward is pictured first on the left before the Super Tiger’s releaseAlthough cosmic rays were discovered over 100 years ago, physicists still do not know where in the Universe they come from.Dr. Ward and his team are trying to show that cosmic rays come from explosions within groups of enormous hot stars, known as OB associations.The Super-TIGER instrument is about the size of a snooker table and weighs in at around two tons. It was launched from the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica on a NASA high-altitude balloon on the 9th December 2012.The balloon itself is massive, weighing some 5,000 lbs. It is made of plastic a little thicker than cling film and when fully inflated could easily fit Croke Park inside it!The balloon has circled the South Pole twice, at an altitude of around 130,000 feet. So far the team have collected over 50 million cosmic-ray particles.This morning Dr. Ward’s balloon flight surpassed the previous record of 42 days, set in 2004 by another Donegal man, Jojo Boyle from Dungloe with the CREAM cosmic-ray project.It is expected that Dr. Ward’s balloon will stay in the air for another 10-14 days. When the balloon is back close to McMurdo Station, it will be brought down by a remote controlled explosion triggered from a NASA satellite that will rip a massive hole in the balloon and allow the Super-TIGER instrument to fall back to Earth on a parachute. Dr. Ward will then fly in a small Twin Otter ski plane to where ever in Antarctica that the parachute lands.His first job will be to secure the valuable data disks before dismantling and recovering the two ton instrument. Dr. Ward is expected to leave Antarctica at the close of the summer season in February.An image of the two and a quarter turns taken around the South Pole by the Super TigerDONEGAL SCIENTIST CONQUERS ANTARCTICA WITH AMAZING BALLOON RECORD was last modified: January 20th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:AntarcticaDr John E WardGlentiesNASASuper Tigerlast_img read more

Ally McCoist: ‘Crystal Palace vs Brighton a derby? I’m not having that’

first_img Crystal Palace and Brighton’s last meeting in the Premier League in December ended in a 3-1 win for the Seagulls Palace and Brighton were also drawn together in the first round of the FA Cup that season which – after two draws and the second replay being delayed twice due to bad weather and eventually being played at Stamford Bridge – Crystal Palace won 1-0 after Brighton were controversially denied a late penalty.Even Mullery has admitted he didn’t quite understand why the two clubs’ became such fierce enemies: “I used to find it very difficult to understand what their problem was,” he told the Guardian in 2011. Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won 2 Ally McCoist reacted with disbelief when he was told about Crystal Palace and Brighton’s unlikely rivalry, ahead of their ‘derby’ on Saturday.Brighton fans the 45 mile trip to Selhurst Park this weekend in the latest edition of the battle of the birds – with LIVE and EXCLUSIVE commentary on talkSPORT! 2 REVEALED LATEST PREMIER LEAGUE NEWS tense Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Terry Venables (second left) and Alan Mullery (second right) apparently fell out after Mullery was named Tottenham captain ahead of Venables by manager Bill Nicholson huge blow shining center_img no dice Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? REVEALED Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City gameday cracker Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card “Portsmouth and Brighton are 20 miles apart, Arsenal and Tottenham are about three miles apart. When you’ve got clubs 45 miles apart it does sound a bit silly.“I don’t think it was just the Cup run that started it off, I think it was the rivalry between their manager and me. That’s where the rivalry came about. Because we were in the same league, doing the same thing — trying to get into the First Division at the same time.”And Rangers legend McCoist – who certainly knows what a derby is all about – says he’s not having it! Most of football’s great rivalries feature teams fighting for local supremacy or involved in long years of intense competition for trophies.You think of Liverpool vs Manchester United, Arsenal vs Tottenham, Barcelona vs Real Madrid and Celtic vs Rangers.Neither is true for Palace’s rivalry with Brighton – born from just one season in 1976/77 when the clubs appointed rival managers Terry Venables (Palace) and Alan Mullery (Brighton) and went head-to-head for promotion from the then-Third Division.Both sides achieved their goal, although Mansfield actually won the league that year, but the two clubs were bitter enemies by the end of the season. deals 👎 “I’m not having that as a derby!” “Have you seen Quadrophenia!?”It’s #CPFC v #BHAFC tomorrow……but Ally refuses to believe it should be seen as a derby!Does your side have any non-derby derbies? 🤔 pic.twitter.com/LHJoxm5ecr— The Alan Brazil Sports Breakfast (@SportsBreakfast) March 8, 2019LISTEN LIVE: Tune into talkSPORT for Crystal Palace v Brighton, Saturday March 9, Kick Off: 12:30pmlast_img read more

Lampard on Terry’s return to Chelsea, expects transfer window ruling ‘very soon’

first_img GETTY Check out all the live commentaries coming up across our network this week…Millwall vs Nottingham Forest (Friday, 19:45) – talkSPORT 2Everton vs Chelsea (Saturday, 12:30) – talkSPORTHuddersfield vs Leeds (Saturday, 12:30) – talkSPORT 2Tottenham vs Burnley (Saturday 15:00) – talkSPORT 2Manchester City vs Manchester United (Saturday, 17:30) – talkSPORTWest Brom vs Swansea (Sunday, 12:00) – talkSPORT 2 2 Lampard and Terry enjoyed huge success together as Chelsea teammates GETTY Frank Lampard is looking forward to welcoming John Terry back to Chelsea.The club’s most successful ever captain will return to Stamford Bridge as Aston Villa assistant manager on Wednesday, for the first time since he left the Blues in 2017. Terry and Lampard were teammates for the best part of 14 years and share a close relationship away from football,But friendship will be put to one side for 90 minutes as Villa are hoping to build on their impressive 2-2 draw at Manchester United, while Chelsea will not want another home upset after losing 1-0 to West Ham.It will not be the first time the pair have come up against each other, having previously met in the Championship last season and in the play-off final, which Lampard’s Derby lost to Villa at Wembley.“I went up against him (Terry) twice last year and have huge respect for the work he’s doing with Dean Smith,” said Lampard.“It’s about John and the reception he’ll get from the fans – he deserves that moment.”At his press conference on Tuesday, Lampard discussed other topics aside from Terry’s return, including Chelsea’s appeal against their two-window transfer ban and the latest with Tammy Abraham’s hip injury.Here are the best bits…Will Abraham be fit to face Villa?“We’re giving him every possible chance to be fit. He’s still got some pain in the area of the injury, we’ll make a judgement tomorrow.“It’s painful for him, so it’s a pain threshold and whether it affects his movements. So I wouldn’t want to commit today.“He was in good form, and with players that are important you want to give them as much time.“He’s keen and we’re trying our best to give him time, but if he’s not ready we have to go in a different route anyway.” Will Ross Barkley return after recently showing ‘lack of professionalism’?“Ross Barkley has been sick, he was ill Sunday night. He is in this morning but not recovered enough to be available tomorrow.“He has been training well. That has never been a huge issue and now he has to keep that level and push that level and compete for a place. That is up to Ross now.”When will Antonio Rudiger be fit?“Rudiger is close, he’s really stepped up his training, particularly in the last week. So we’re hoping he’ll be available in the next week to ten days.”On John Terry’s return“Well it’s not much different for me, I went up against him twice last year.“We obviously get on very well and I’ve got huge respect for him and the work he and Dean Smith have done there with Aston Villa.“So I think it’s more about John, and the reception he’ll quite rightly get from the Chelsea fans; the most decorated captain, the greatest captain who won everything.“He feels the club, everyone knows that, and I’m sure the fans will certainly show their appreciation.“I’m sure it will be pretty emotional for John, and he deserves that moment. And I’ll certainly be pleased to see his face back at the Bridge.“I spoke to him last week and we had a conversation. We are pretty regularly in conversation but we are both focused on our roles.“He is working hard there to get results, as are we here. It will be nice to catch up.”When will the Court of Arbitration for Sport announce its decision on Chelsea’s appeal against transfer ban?“I haven’t heard any more. So I would wait and reserve judgement until we get the judgement and see where we want to go from there.“Very soon I believe [the decision will come]. Days, I think.” LIVE on talkSPORT 2 Abraham was on loan at Villa last season and played a key role in the club winning promotion last_img read more