‘Full-blown crisis’: North America has lost nearly 3 billion birds since 1970

first_imgSince 1970, bird populations in the continental U.S. and Canada have suffered a net loss of 29 percent, or 2.9 billion birds.Grassland birds seem to have been hit the hardest: there’s been a 53 percent reduction in grassland-bird populations since 1970; more than 700 million breeding individuals have been lost, and three-quarters of all examined grassland bird species are declining.The study did not look into the causes of the bird declines, but the researchers say the patterns of loss in North America are similar to those observed elsewhere in the world, and the causes, including habitat loss, are likely to be similar. Bird populations are crashing in North America. And it’s not just the rare and threatened species that are disappearing ⁠— even the common, seemingly widespread backyard birds like sparrows, warblers and finches are vanishing right under our noses, a new study has found.Since 1970, bird populations in the continental U.S. and Canada have suffered a net loss of 29 percent, or 2.9 billion birds. Researchers arrived at this staggering number by analyzing close to 50 years of population data for 529 species of birds, gleaned from multiple long-term bird-monitoring data sets.They also analyzed data recorded by the network of 143 weather radars across the U.S., to track the changes in nighttime spring migration of birds from 2007 and 2017. The radars, which can detect avian migration even in areas where birds are otherwise poorly monitored on the ground, revealed a 14 percent decline in migratory birds since 2007.North America has a bird crisis, the researchers say. And many bird species could soon head down the path of the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), a bird that once numbered in the billions, but silently went extinct by the early 1900s.“This is a bird emergency with a clear message: the natural world humans depend on is being paved, logged, eroded and polluted. You don’t need to look hard for the metaphor: birds are the canaries in the coal mine that is the earth’s future,” David Yarnold, president and CEO of the National Audubon Society, who was not involved in the study, said in a statement. “This is a full-blown crisis that requires political leadership as well as mass individual action.”Wood thrush. Image by Michael Parr/American Bird Conservancy.Most of the loss — over 90 percent — occurred across 12 bird families, including sparrows, warblers, blackbirds and finches. But grassland birds seem to have been hit the hardest. Since 1970, there’s been a 53 percent reduction in grassland-bird populations, with 700 million fewer breeding individuals today than in 1970. Nearly 75 percent of all examined grassland bird species are on the decline, the study found.A few groups, like raptors and wetland birds, saw a net gain in their population over the past five decades. But these increases are not sufficient to offset the overall larger losses, the researchers say.“Multiple, independent lines of evidence show a massive reduction in the abundance of birds,” Ken Rosenberg, the study’s lead author and a senior scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and American Bird Conservancy, said in a statement. “We expected to see continuing declines of threatened species. But for the first time, the results also showed pervasive losses among common birds across all habitats, including backyard birds.”While the study did not look into the causes of the bird declines, the researchers say the patterns of loss in North America are similar to those observed elsewhere in the world, and the causes are likely to be similar.Take the grassland birds, for example. Widespread conversion of grasslands to farmlands and urban areas, and the extensive use of toxic pesticides in breeding and wintering areas of the birds, are likely responsible for the reduction in grassland bird numbers in North America as they have been across Europe.Birds are good indicators of environmental health and are among the best monitored groups of animals. Their decline represents just the tip of an iceberg, the researchers say, and could indicate similar losses in other animal groups.“These data are consistent with what we’re seeing elsewhere with other taxa showing massive declines, including insects and amphibians,” Peter Marra, senior scientist emeritus and former head of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and now director of the Georgetown Environment Initiative at Georgetown University, said in the statement.“It’s imperative to address immediate and ongoing threats, both because the domino effects can lead to the decay of ecosystems that humans depend on for our own health and livelihoods, and because people all over the world cherish birds in their own right,” Marra added. “Can you imagine a world without birdsong?”Baltimore oriole. Image by Gary Mueller/Macaulay Library at Cornell Lab of Ornithology.Citation:Rosenberg et al. (2019) Decline of the North American avifauna. Science. eaaw1313. doi:10.1126/science.aaw1313. Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Research, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Give it back to the gods: Reviving Māori tradition to protect marine life

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Development, Ecotourism, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Saltwater Fish, Sustainable Development, Tourism, Wildlife Article published by Rebecca Kessler Ra’ui is an ancient Polynesian form of resource management in which traditional leaders close designated areas to the harvest of key species.While the power of ra’ui remains strong in the outer Cook Islands, where local tradition often trumps national decree, the system fell into disuse on the largest and most populous island of Rarotonga half a century ago.There, traditional leaders briefly and successfully revived the ra’ui system two decades ago, only for it to falter again in recent years.Today, traditional leaders in the Cook Islands are cautiously optimistic that the country’s 2017 decision to designate its entire marine territory as a mixed-use protected area will help reinvigorate ra’ui across Rarotonga. This story is part of a series on Marae Moana, the massive, recently enacted multiple-use marine protected area covering the Cook Islands’ entire exclusive economic zone. Other stories in the series:Building the world’s biggest MPA: Q&A with Goldman winner Jacqueline EvansWill a massive marine protected area safeguard Cook Islands’ ocean?Paradise, polluted: Cook Islands tries to clean up its tourism sectorCook Islands MPA leader fired after supporting seabed mining freezeRAROTONGA, Cook Islands — On March 1, 2000, traditional Māori elders gathered with family, community members and government officials on the white-sand shore of Aro’a Lagoon to pray, make speeches, and formally place the water body under the protection of a ra’ui mutu kore — a permanent ban on fishing. Just as they were declaring the ra’ui, a pair of snow-white kākāia, or love terns (Gygis alba) flew close overhead: a sign, according to local lore, that the ceremony was blessed from above.It was certainly timely from a conservation perspective. Overfishing had seriously depleted Aro’a’s marine life, said Liz Raizis, a keen snorkeller and co-owner of the Rarotongan Beach Resort and Lagoonarium that backs onto the lagoon, located on the western side of Rarotonga, the largest and most populated of the Cook Islands. Once the ra’ui was established, populations grew rapidly: Raizis estimates that the number of fish doubled after just one year. Now, nearly 20 years later, she guesses there’s around 100 times more fish life, with new species appearing every year. The coral is regenerating too, bucking the trend of coral retreat around the island and across the globe.A giant clam in Rarotonga. Traditional leaders impose ra’ui to protect and manage stocks of giant clams and other food sources. Image by Ron Caswell via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).The unwritten rules of ra’uiRa’ui is an ancient Polynesian form of resource management. In the Cook Islands, the ui ariki (paramount chiefs) and aronga mana (other traditional leaders) hold inherited rights to manage defined areas of land and sea, with the mandate to ensure the ongoing well-being of their people and the health of the place they call home.These leaders traditionally impose ra’ui on defined areas to ensure the health of key populations, such as coconut crabs (Birgus latro), parrotfish (Chlorurus frontalis) and giant clams (Tridacna gigas), all popular foods among locals. A ra’ui might ban the harvest of all species or just some of them, and it can be temporary or permanent — sometimes ra’ui are lifted just for one day, then reimposed. When a resource is placed under ra’ui, it becomes tapu (sacred, prohibited). In ancient times, breaking a ra’ui was punishable by death or banishment.“You put it in place, you impose the tapu on it, and then that area doesn’t belong to you anymore,” said Puna Rakanui, spokesperson for the House of Ariki, the Cook Islands’ parliamentary body of paramount chiefs. “It goes back to the deities. Give it to them, let them do what they want with it. Give time. And then they will return it to us, so we can reclaim it.”While death sentences are no longer an option, Rakanui said that “the mana [authority, spiritual power] of the ra’ui is still very very strong” on the more isolated of the country’s 13 inhabited islands. “Because they see the value in it.”He recalled a recent visit to Pukapuka, an atoll that sits about 1,140 kilometers (708 miles) northwest of Rarotonga and has just 444 inhabitants. There, he had the opportunity to camp out on an islet that was under a strictly observed ra’ui. “That night I went out for a walk with one of the island dignitaries,” he said. “And in this plantation of puraka [swamp taro, Cyrtosperma merkusii], we shine the torch underneath and we see coconut crabs — in their hundreds! You never see that scene today in the rest of the Cook Islands.”Map shows the location of the Cook Islands, with the international date line running past on a ragged course through the Pacific Ocean. Image courtesy of Google Maps.Traditional ra’ui are not written down, Rakanui said, though sometimes a visual symbol, such as a coconut leaf tied around a tree, demarcates the protected area. “It’s just word, from the aronga mana to the people: there’s a ra’ui over here, nobody is to touch anything. And nobody does!” In Pukapuka, Rakanui stayed right on the boundary of a ra’ui. “If you see a coconut crab crawling [into the ra’ui area], you don’t go and collect it,” he said.Ra’ui are often imposed for short periods, for example as a way to build up stocks for a big event. On Rakanui’s home island of Atiu, the community is currently planning for a big gathering in October, when almost 1,000 guests will congregate. “For occasions like that, they will put a ra’ui,” he said. “Then during the time of that event they will lift it, and people will go and harvest, to support the event.”The method is also commonly used in the aftermath of natural disasters like cyclones. “The aronga mana will quickly move in and say, ‘OK, these are the things that we must put ra’ui on,’” Rakanui said. “This part of the island you can harvest; anything on the ground, you can collect. The rest of it you leave, because we need something to support us all later.”A red-toothed triggerfish (Odonus niger) in Aro’a Lagoon, where one of Rarotonga’s most effective ra’ui continues to protect marine life. Image courtesy of Rarotongan Beach Resort and Lagoonarium.Loss, revival and decline While the power of ra’ui remains strong in the outer Cook Islands, where local tradition often trumps national decree, the system fell into disuse on Rarotonga half a century ago, as colonial structures and mind-sets took hold. In 1888, Britain claimed the Cook Islands as a protectorate, and in 1901 annexed them to New Zealand, its colony at the time. Under the Cook Islands Act of 1915, the colonial government claimed ownership of the lagoon waters that encircle each island from the high-tide mark outward to the protective ring of coral reef, thus formally erasing indigenous rights to manage them. But in practice the ui ariki maintained much of their power over the following decades.The Cook Islands gained self-governance in 1965, and the following year the prime minister, Albert Henry, created the House of Ariki. In 1972, his party also created the Koutu Nui, a similar statutory body to represent the aronga mana. The intention of integrating these traditional structures into the government was to lend legitimacy to the new nation, but it was also widely criticized for disempowering the ariki and aronga mana: corralling them into a colonial structure where they enjoyed plenty of dignity, but no authority. The dominance of Western-style governance grew, and by the 1970s, the ra’ui system was defunct on Rarotonga.Travel Tou Ariki, president of the House of Ariki, the Cook Islands’ parliamentary body of paramount traditional chiefs. Image courtesy of the Marae Moana Coordination Office.However, in the late 1980s, both the Koutu Nui and the government’s tourism planners became interested in bringing back the practice of ra’ui, both to protect marine life and to attract tourists. In 1998, the Koutu Nui formally revived the pratice, giving local chiefs the power to impose and lift ra’ui in areas within their traditional jurisdictions. The chiefs established four no-take areas around Rarotonga, to which they added Aro’a Lagoon two years later.Technically, the government still owns these areas. “But they’re very sympathetic to the way that [the traditional bodies] are doing our work now,” Rakanui said. “So they’ve been willing to work together with us.” Local and central government representatives hoped to enact the ra’ui system into law. However, the members of the Koutu Nui felt people were more likely to honor the protections if they remained under traditional mandates, so ra’ui stayed under their auspices and as such are not legally binding.Backed by powerful traditional leadership and a strong program educating locals about each ra’ui, the protections proved extremely successful — at least initially. When various ra’ui were lifted for defined periods after several years, the boost to local marine life was obvious, Rakanui said. “The mullets that used to come in!” he exclaimed. “They were breeding all over the place, in their hundreds and thousands; the parrotfish were breeding all over!”Marine scientist Jacqueline Evans agreed. “It was really successful in terms of the marine resources,” she said. “We noticed the invertebrates, all the shellfish and everything had increased significantly after a couple of years. So it was working!”Jacqueline Evans. Image courtesy of Goldman Environmental Prize.Inspired by this success, other communities around the island established more ra’ui, building the total number to 12 in the early 2000s. But since the enthusiastic implementation two decades ago, “most of the ra’ui in Rarotonga have collapsed,” Rakanui said. “It’s been really sad.”He said the pressure to make an income in an increasingly money-driven economy has contributed to the change. “People are wanting to get out there, get what they want, and sell it.”If a ra’ui is breached and there are no visible consequences, people begin to lose faith in the system, Evans said. “As soon as they see someone fishing there, they’re like, ‘Oh, that’s not working. I might as well fish there too.’”Changes in leadership and a lapse in the education program also contributed to the demise of some ra’ui. “There are ra’ui on Rarotonga where a single community leader has passed away and the ra’ui has been plundered within weeks,” Raizis said.“The traditional leaders do still have a bit of pull,” said Maria Tuoro, project coordinator for Ridge2Reef, an international conservation program that operates out of the environment ministry, “but over the years I’ve seen that power less and less. Everyone knows the benefits of [ra’ui], but often people are so busy that no one cares [if a ra’ui is broken] — and there’s no enforcement, either.”“Now everybody’s doing everything that they want,” Rakanui said. “We’ve been encouraging them not to harvest, but there’s no law to stop them.” In 2015, locals and tourists were outraged when a group of young locals spearfished and killed an ancient, tame and much-beloved moray eel (Gymnothorax javanicus) affectionately known as Roger, within a ra’ui area of Muri Lagoon. “But they couldn’t do anything,” Rakanui said, “because [from a legal standpoint] the water is free for all!”Concerned about the ra’ui collapses, the Ministry of Marine Resources (MMR) drafted a regulation for ra’ui in 2011, but the House of Ariki refused it. While there are obvious benefits to regulation in the current context, many ui ariki are concerned about ceding too much power to the government. The draft regulations, for example, would have required the MMR’s permission to put a ra’ui in place — a move they saw as undermining the authority of local chiefs to make those decisions independently. What’s more, many ui ariki are reluctant to punish their people in courts of law, preferring practices such as making the infractions public and temporarily confiscating people’s fishing gear.A neglected ra’ui sign by Muri Lagoon on Rarotonga. Image by Monica Evans for Mongabay.A win-win situationThe Aro’a Lagoon ra’ui has made it through the past 20 years relatively unscathed; it’s considered the best-respected on the island. Why is it working so well where others have failed?Raizis said the time spent on building broad-based consensus with a wide range of people in the community has been crucial to the ra’ui’s success. The landowners are strong and proactive managers; the Rarotongan Beach Resort, which fronts the entire ra’ui area, actively supports protection efforts; and local schools are heavily involved.“Education is key for the long-term sustainability of any community-based marine sanctuary,” Raizis said. Many fisherpeople were not initially supportive of the ra’ui, but “they’ve become among the strongest supporters,” she said. “Fish breed and grow and then move into other parts of the lagoon where fishing is allowed, thus improving the odds of a catch in the surrounding lagoons.”It’s uncommon these days for people to break the ra’ui: those who do are usually overseas workers and tourists who are unaware of it, or visiting Cook Islanders who live elsewhere. Because the resort has watchpeople employed throughout the day and night, the area is well-monitored, which likely puts off many would-be fishers.“There was one occasion where Cook Islanders returning for Christmas holidays pressured the local chiefs to open the ra’ui for one day,” Raizis said. “It was a complete disaster for Aro’a Lagoon, with large numbers of people from all over the island — locals and tourists — descending on the reserve with spear guns, nets and so on, trampling all over the coral and taking away fish and other marine life by the sack and truckload,” she said. “It was sobering just how much damage could be done in just one day: it took years for the ra’ui to recover. Thankfully, it has never happened again.”In 2017, the government passed the historic Marae Moana Act designating the country’s entire exclusive economic zone (EEZ) as a mixed-use marine protected area — currently the largest in the world. Traditional leaders were involved in the project’s development from the outset, and the legislation was intended to provide support for local ra’ui, within a broader context of marine management across the EEZ. The extensive consultation process has already raised the public’s level of awareness of marine conservation issues, and boosted the Cook Islands’ “green” reputation among many tourists.Travel Tou Ariki, president of the House of Ariki, is cautiously optimistic that the growth in awareness will help reinvigorate ra’ui across Rarotonga. “We are now at the moment waiting to reap the benefits” of helping to create Marae Moana, he said. “Our ancestors, they always say ‘you protect, and then you harvest.’ Just two words, but there’s a lot of meaning in it. If you don’t protect, then you can’t harvest. You got nothing!”The headquarters of the House of Ariki, the Cook Islands’ parliamentary body of paramount traditional chiefs. The House of Ariki has supported reviving the traditional ra’ui system for managing natural resources, but has rejected efforts to codify it into law. Image by Monica Evans for Mongabay.Monica Evans is a freelance writer based in Aotearoa New Zealand who specializes in environmental and community development issues. She has a master’s degree in development studies from Victoria University of Wellington. Find her at www.monicaevans.org.Update 9/30/19: Shortly after this article was published, the office of the Cook Islands’ prime minister announced that Maria Tuoro, project coordinator for Ridge2Reef,  would replace Jacqueline Evans as director of the Marae Moana Act’s coordination office, according to the Cook Islands News.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Violence against indigenous peoples explodes in Brazil

first_imgBrazil’s Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI) has published its annual report on violence against indigenous peoples, showing a sharp rise in murders and land grabs.According to the report, 135 indigenous peoples were killed in 2018 — an increase of 23 percent from the previous year. There were also a large number of deaths that occurred as a result of state negligence, including suicide (101 cases) and infant mortality (519 cases).Preliminary data for 2019 indicate that, in the first nine months of the Bolsonaro government, there have already been reports of 160 cases of land invasion, illegal exploitation of natural resources, and damage to property in 153 indigenous territories — twice as many compared to the previous year. On the same day that President Jair Bolsonaro made his anti-indigenous speech at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, Brazil’s Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI) released its annual report, “Violence Against Indigenous Peoples in Brazil.” The data collected are from 2018, but the report also includes preliminary information for 2019, and the findings are alarming.In the first nine months of the Bolsonaro government, which took office at the start of 2019, there have already been reports of 160 cases of land invasion, illegal exploitation of natural resources, and damage to property in 153 indigenous territories. This is a significant increase from 2018, both in number and scope: according to CIMI’s report, 111 incidents of this type were reported in 76 indigenous territories last year. With 2019 not yet over, the total area that has come under attack is already double last year’s.The report does not include homicide data for 2019, but reveals that 135 indigenous people were murdered in 2018 — an increase of almost 23 percent from 2017, when 110 indigenous people were murdered. The state of Roraima stands out as the most violent, with 62 homicides, followed by Mato Grosso do Sul, with 38. Combined with data provided by Sesai (the Special Indigenous Health Secretariat) and state health departments, CIMI recorded violent deaths of indigenous peoples in 12 Brazilian states.“This is the result of the policy of genocide initiated under the Temer government, with stripping of agencies that provide assistance and protection, like INCRA and Funai, emphasizing the idea that indigenous territories should be exploited,” said Roberto Liebgott, CIMI’s southern region coordinator and one of those responsible for producing the report. According to Liebgott, Bolsonaro’s statement as presidential candidate that “not a centimeter will be demarcated either as an indigenous reserve or as a quilombola” — land owned by descendants of runaway slaves — was the “trigger that authorized a criminal state, allowing that land to be pillaged for the benefit of the sectors who elected him.”CIMI’s report also draws attention to other cases of deaths resulting from state negligence, including suicides and infant mortality. In 2018, 101 indigenous people took their own lives in Brazil, 44 of them in Mato Grosso do Sul. “The situation there clearly reflects a failed model. Far from their native lands, confined to overpopulated reserves or on the sides of big motorways, faced with extreme vulnerability, isolation and lack of opportunities, many opt to take their own lives, often by hanging themselves,” Liebgott said.The infant mortality rate is also high. Last year, according to data collected by Sesai, 591 indigenous children aged five and below died as a result of state negligence. Almost 40 percent (219 children) lived in the state of Amazonas, which has the highest infant mortality rate in the country. According to Sesai, deaths in infancy are directly linked to a lack of medical assistance, which is even more urgent in the areas of extreme vulnerability where many indigenous peoples live. It is common for many villages to lack basic sanitation and even access to clean drinking water.Guarani Kaiowá indigenous people in the Guapo’y Guasu community, in the Dourados Amambai Peguá Indigenous Reserve, in Mato Grosso do Sul. Image by Tiago Miotto/CIMI.Return to the pastCIMI’s report also features details of other forms of violence carried out against indigenous peoples, including deforestation, gold and diamond mining, the contamination of rivers, illegal hunting and fishing, the opening of drug-trafficking routes, and even the systematic implementation of burning in forest areas. “Before, the invaders would take the wood and leave. Now they take the wood and set the rest on fire. They destroy everything. The only thing left is ashes. The state, whose job it is to protect, endorses this destruction, supported by the bancadas ruralistas [the Ruralist Block in Congress] and evangelicals,” Liebgott said.The increase in the illegal practice of dividing indigenous land into lots and selling it, especially in the northern region, is concerning. The indigenous lands of the Arariboia (in Maranhão state), Karipuna and Uru Eu Wau Wau (both in Rondônia) are some examples of ancestral territories that have been divided up by land grabbers with the criminal intent to sell them. Another serious case of violation of the original rights of indigenous peoples is that of the lands of the Munduruku (in Pará state), where it is estimated that more than 500 miners have now settled.“It is the worst it has been since the redemocratization of Brazil. The attitude now is to return to the past, to the end of the 1970s, when megaprojects in indigenous territories — construction of motorways, hydroelectric dams and mines — were very damaging to the lives of indigenous peoples,” Liebgott said.“Over the past few years, indigenous peoples, by demanding the demarcation of their territories, have become the target for attacks,” the report says. This has not only been reinforced in the rhetoric of officials opposed to the demarcation of indigenous lands, including Bolsonaro, but has also driven repeated invasions of these traditionally occupied areas. CIMI reports that out of the 1,290 indigenous lands that have been claimed in Brazil, 821 (63 percent of the total) are still pending finalization of the demarcation process. Of these, 528 have not seen any measures at all taken by the state.“If we get too caught up on Bolsonaro, we will lose hope,” Liebgott said. “We need to remember that he is not the government, he is not able to do everything. Bolsonaro is part of an idiotic, fascist, hypocritical and dishonest government that invents data and twists reality. However, the rights acquired by indigenous peoples must be maintained. It is fundamental that international bodies ask the Brazilian government to take measures to stop this barbarity from taking place and that those responsible be punished.”Dom Roque Paloschi, the CIMI president and archbishop of Porto Velho in Rondônia state, said “violence against indigenous peoples has become an institutionalized disease” in Brazil. In his introduction to the report, he painted a very grim picture for the future of these communities: “If this predatory cycle of global dimensions is not contained, their forests will be destroyed, and their lands will be divided and subjected to indiscriminate exploitation. After the fences have been put up, the indigenous peoples that remain will be left, like those in the South, at the edges of farms and on the sides of roads; or will have to abandon their traditional ways of life and become manual laborers at the service of the accumulation of capital”.Banner image of Guarani Kaiowá indigenous people in the Guapo’y Guasu community, in the Dourados Amambai Peguá Indigenous Reserve, Mato Grosso do Sul, by Tiago Miotto/CIMI.This article was first published by Mongabay Brasil. Conflict, Conservation, Environment, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Land Conflict, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

UK supermarkets criticized over pesticide use, lack of transparency

first_imgArticle published by daniel Agriculture, Bees, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Pesticides, Public Health, Supply Chain New research suggests UK supermarkets are not doing enough to protect human health and the environment from the most hazardous pesticides in their supply chain.An analysis of the top 10 retailers in the UK by the Pesticide Action Network UK criticized many supermarket chains for failing to be transparent about their use of pesticides.Pesticides found in supermarkets’ supply chains include carcinogens, reproductive toxins and endocrine disruptors that interfere with hormones. UK supermarkets are not doing enough to protect human health and the environment from the most hazardous pesticides in their supply chain, according to new research.An analysis rating the top 10 retailers in the UK by the Pesticide Action Network UK (PAN UK) also criticized several supermarket brands for failing to be transparent about the use of pesticides in their supply chains.Pesticides found in supermarkets’ supply chains include carcinogens, reproductive toxins and endocrine disruptors that interfere with hormones, but the charity said customers are not routinely given relevant information on product labels and websites.PAN UK ranked supermarkets with the largest share of sales against eight criteria related to pesticide use and transparency based on a survey.Lidl did not respond to the survey and was ranked last as a result, while Asda and Iceland were found to be “lagging behind”, respectively in eighth and ninth place in the ranking. The Co-op, Tesco, Morrisons and Aldi received a middle ranking of “could do better”; Marks & Spencer, Waitrose and Sainsbury’s were said to be “making good progress” since the last review was carried out in 2011.PAN UK highlighted the harms caused to bees and other pollinators by the supermarkets’ operations, such as the continued use of bee-toxic neonicotinoids in Aldi’s global supply chain despite an EU ban on the substance entering into force last year. In August, an investigation by Agência Pública and Repórter Brasil found that the use of neonicotinoids in Brazil had led to the death of half a billion bees between December 2018 and February 2019.PAN UK said all the supermarkets included in the survey continued to allow the use of highly hazardous pesticides as defined by the United Nations, while some, including Marks & Spencer and the Co-op, had regressed in terms of transparency by limiting access to residue testing data.As higher-end supermarkets are doing more to reduce harm from pesticides, customers on lower incomes are less likely to have the choice to shop at supermarkets with higher standards, PAN UK said.Most supermarkets maintain lists of specific pesticides that are monitored, restricted or banned, but only Marks & Spencer makes theirs public, PAN UK said.Josie Cohen, head of policy and campaigns at PAN UK, said concerned shoppers’ trying to find out what chemicals their family was exposed to had little information to go on.“The information isn’t on food labels or supermarket websites. Customers have the right to know which food contains the most pesticides so, at the very least, supermarkets should be publishing the results of their in-house residue testing schemes,” she said.“Most of the pesticides used in global agriculture are entirely unnecessary. There are tried and tested non-chemical alternatives which protect human health and don’t trash the environment but still produce the amount of food we need.“The ranking has revealed that the pricier supermarkets tend to be doing more to tackle pesticides. But the truth is all UK supermarkets make huge profits so there is absolutely no need to pass the cost of pesticide reduction on to customers. If we are to have any chance of reversing the current biodiversity and public health crises, then all supermarkets need to step up and do more to prevent pesticide-related harms.”Supermarkets included in the ranking have said they are working to improve information-sharing with customers and that their suppliers’ use of pesticides is governed by EU regulations. Asda this week began to publish the results of its pesticide residue tests.Banner image of a pesticide warning sign. Image courtesy of Austin Valley on flickr.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

After a mine killed their river, a Brazil tribe fights for a new home

first_imgBiodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conflict, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Culture, Dams, Disasters, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Governance, Government, Green, Human Rights, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Rights, Law Enforcement, Rivers, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Traditional People A group of indigenous Pataxó and Pataxó Ha-ha-hãe are fighting to be relocated to a new home as the banks of the Paraopeba River where they live remains contaminated with heavy metals a year after the collapse of a tailings dam belonging to miner Vale.To date, Paraopeba’s waters still run dark with the mining waste, and there are no fish in it. Residents also complain of skin diseases and other health problems as a result of the contamination.In August 2019, the Nahô Xohã community filed a formal request with the Federal Prosecutor’s Office in Minas Gerais state for a temporary new home.The plan is to find a farm nearby of similar size to their current territory, where they can grow their own food and live with access to drinking water until the final reparation process is concluded by Vale. One year after a tailings dam collapsed in Brazil’s southwestern state of Minas Gerais, unleashing 12 million cubic meters (424 million cubic feet) of toxic mud that killed at least 259 people, a group of indigenous Pataxó and Pataxó Ha-ha-hãe are still fighting for relocation as the polluted waters of the Paraopeba River can no longer support their existence.“The river is dead, but we are fighting to stay alive,” says shaman Angohó Ha-ha-hãe, one of the leaders of Nahô Xohãcommunity, home to some 200 indigenous residents 23 kilometers (14 miles) downstream from where the breach occurred in the city of Brumadinho.A dusty road leads to the Naô Xohã village, a community of families of Pataxó and Pataxó Ha-ha-hãe indigenous people. Image by Luiz Guilherme Fernandes for MongabayHer home on the banks of the Paraopeba was just one of many affected by one of Brazil’s biggest environmental disasters when, on Jan. 25 last year, a wave of mining waste from a mine belonging to Brazilian mining giant Vale destroyed an area of 300 hectares(741 acres) and caused severe environmental impacts in the region. Authorities confirmed 259 people were killed in the disaster, with another 11 still missing and presumed dead.Paraopeba’s waters are still running dark with the mining waste; there are no fish, and the adults have to monitor their kids to prevent them from trying to bathe in the river. “Sometimes we blink, and a kid goes for a swim. Of course, several of us are getting sick, with skin conditions that we don’t know anything about. And there are no doctors here to treat us either,” Angohó says.The Paraopeba has been the center of the Nahô Xohã’s livelihood since a small branch of the indigenousPataxó Ha-Ha-Hãe settled in the territory three years ago. After fighting land disputes in the northeastern state of Bahia for over three decades, some families moved to the neighboring state of Minas Gerais with the aim to live in nature, according to their customs.Such a move is part of Pataxó’s traditions and, since then, the indigenous group have been waiting for the area they occupy on the riverbank, in the municipality of São Joaquim de Bicas, to be recognized and demarcated as an indigenous territory by the government — although abandoned, the area is privately owned.But their claims have now changed as the Paraopeba has become useless not only for human consumption but also for irrigating crops and for fishing.The indigenous inhabitants’ links to the river, though, go beyond that. According to Jorge Luiz de Paula, local coordinator of Brazil’s federal indigenous affairs agency, known as FUNAI, they are also very dependent on the river to keep their religion alive. “Pataxó ethnicity has its cosmology very linked to the water in their rituals,” de Paula says.Among their beliefs is that the god Txôpai, or theriver itself, created mankind and, therefore, is responsible for healing those who pray for him.In August last year, the community lost hope of a speedy resolution by Vale about their situation and filed a formal request at the Federal Prosecutor’s Office for a temporary new home. The plan is to find a farm nearby of similar size to their current territory, where they can grow their own food and live with access to drinking water until the final reparation process is concluded by Vale.“We can no longer endure this suffering because of the contamination [of the river],” Arakuã Pataxó, the community’s chief, told Mongabay. “Our people have been sick, with diarrhea, the kids’ noses are always bleeding, many of us are depressed. Our people are desperate.”Water conditions at stakeThe Paraopeba River, whose name means “large river” in Tupi, an indigenous language, spans 510 km (317 miles) and crosses 35 municipalities of Minas Gerais state.A study by the National Agency for Water (ANA), published right after the disaster, reported values of up to 21 times higher of heavy metals in its waters. These include manganese, iron, aluminum, nickel, lead, mercury, zinc, cobalt and even arsenic, among others.The Paraopeba River has been affected by the disaster caused by the collapse of a mining dam operated by Vale on 25 of January 2019. Image by Luiz Guilherme Fernandes for MongabayIn February 2019, a month after the disaster, the department of health and environment in Minas Gerais state issued a document recommending the suspension of water use from the river for any purpose. The latest report issued in December shows that the presence of toxic elements recorded has dropped to acceptable levels, or below the class limit.Despite that, some experts warn that the monitoring may not be precise, as there is residue deposited on the bed of the river.  This means that each time it rains heavily , the iron ore deposit will be churned back up to the surface and contaminate the water again.“We bathed there, took our water from it, washed our clothes there and fished from it. Indigenous people live from fishing, hunting and farming. What are we going to do now?” Arakuã says.Divided communityNaô Xohã, which means “warrior spirit” in the community’s native tongue, is divided now, residents say. Some of them say that Vale is working to turn them against each other, destabilizing the community’s harmony since the disaster.The lack of resolution on the community´s future a year after the disaster is distressing, they say. In the past four months, 10 families decided to leave the village and two different leaders were chosen, which is not usual for the community, they said.“The fewer of us here, the better for Vale”, Angohó said.Indigenous people sell their handcrafted artwork at Naô Xohã village in the municipality of São Joaquim de Bicas, neighbor of Brumadinho, where the disaster took place. Image by Luiz Guilherme Fernandes for MongabayVale did not comment on the allegations, but said in a statement that it “respects the indigenous communities, their social and political organization and tries to keep an open and transparent dialogue with the indigenous community.”Given Vale’s record, the indigenous community may have reason to be concerned about the delay in the company’s reparation plans. The same company was responsible for the biggest environmental disaster in Brazil, a near-identical tailings dam collapse in the city of Mariana in 2015. The case is still pending in Brazilian courts and several families are still displaced.Since April 2019, the company has been paying emergency aid on a monthly basis to Naô Xohãresidents. According to the Federal Prosecutor’s Office, emergency relief was paid out to 61 families from the PataxóandPataxó Ha-ha-hãeindigenous communities.Edmundo Antônio Dias, a federal prosecutor and a member of a task force of prosecutors in charge of investigating the disaster, said his office set up a meeting last month with Vale to make the displacement request official.Talks with Vale haven’t always been easy, Dias says. “In the case of Vale, the presence of a judge is key to rebalance the power forces,” Dias says. “There is a huge gap between the social responsibility narrative the company uses and reality.”For the next step in the process, an independent technical consultancy was hired in December to make an assessment of the socioeconomic damage at the Naô Xohãvillage and to help them pick a new site for relocation.  The results are yet to be released.Angohó Ha-ha-hãe is a shaman and one of the leaders of Naô Xohã indigenous village, which is requesting to be temporarily relocated by Vale due to the river pollution. Image by Luiz Guilherme Fernandes for Mongabay“This is all very sad for us,” Angohó says. “Sometimes I lose my strength. Vale mutilated bodies and killed dreams.”Banner image caption: Shaman Angohó Ha-ha-hãe, one of the leaders of Naô Xohã indigenous village, poses for a photo close to the Paraopeba River. The Naô Xohã community is requesting to be temporarily relocated by Vale due to the river pollution. Image by Luiz Guilherme Fernandes for MongabayFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Karla Mendescenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

My players are stressed – Clarke

first_imgArnett Gardens Under-20 coach, Orlando Clarke has said he is concerned about the mentality of his players, as he believes that the delayed Alliance MoneyGram/McKay Security football final versus Tivoli Gardens Under-20, is putting a strain on his youngsters. The championship game was originally set for last Saturday, but because of heavy rainfall, was postponed until tomorrow. Clarke says he will have to wait to see how the delay will affect his players going into the rescheduled final. “I’ll have to see the turnout in training, because we weren’t expecting to train this week. The under 20 is played during the exams period so I have a couple of players who are stressed out,” Clarke said. Clarke says he will have to re-evaluate his squad ahead of Wednesday’s final before selecting the team. “Today at training, I’m going to see who we have, and if there will be any changes,” Clarke told The Gleaner. The Junglists will be hunting their fifth under 20 title when they come up against Christopher Burnett’s Tivoli side. They made the final with a convincing 3-0 victory over Seaview Gardens in the semi final. Tivoli Gardens booked their spot with a thrilling penalty shoot-out victory over Waterhouse. Tomorrow’s final kicks off at 6pm at the Drewsland Stadium in Waterhouse. – Lanze Whitelast_img read more

Laurie Foster | Get Bailey in!

first_img HARD TRUTHS The condition in which Jamaica’s football has been allowed to fall is troubling. The second-place finish in the CONCACAF Gold Cup last summer gave a temporary fillip, but since then, losses to Canada and Saudi Arabia have removed the smiles from the nation’s face. Then comes the heartbreaking news that the country’s best young talents are ineligible for entry to the prestigious English Premier League (EPL) unless a FIFA world ranking of a spot in the top 50 is attained. According to recent reports, EPL clubs Brighton and Crystal Palace made moves to sign Reggae Boyz’ first choice goalkeeper Andre Blake but were thwarted by the failure to secure a British work permit because of Jamaica’s low ranking. Something drastic has to be done to raise the level of the sport if this sad situation is not to continue. Foster’s Fairplay has a suggestion. Exposure on a few occasions to the 20-year-old Leon Bailey, as he plays in the German Bundesliga for Bayer Leverkusen is compelling. He has scored two fantastic goals, the last against high-riding Borussia Munchengladbach in a come-from-behind 5-1 victory, coming from 0-1 at half-time. One can add at least three Man of the Match Awards to his name as a testament to his pedigree. As the colloquial language in his country of birth goes, “Him nuh normal.” This player needs to be playing for Jamaica. The newly elected regime at the Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) is being given time to set out its plan, promised in early exchanges post the poll, to be “coming soon.” At the time of writing, it is five weeks since that announcement, which is deemed to be enough for a full roll out. If the reason for the delay is, “we are plotting the Leon Bailey scenario with the intention to invite him, utilising the traditional channels for the next FIFA date,” that would be more than acceptable.” There are some hard truths to be faced. Jamaica needs Bailey and not the other way around. The country can benefit from his presence to have the image of the game restored to the level it enjoyed during the Boyz’ campaign to France ’98. The concept of a fortress, as the Office was, needs resuscitation. Players need to feel that there is a clear path to be taken for them to realise their dreams. This is not to say that all this rebuilding is a one-man job, but it can be a platform on which to build the future by bringing back the match day support Jamaica once knew. With that all this, it must be appreciated that things have gone terribly wrong and must be fixed in the best interests of the nation’s football. The JFF is to be blamed for bringing the Bailey discussions into the public space. Meetings at which these negotiations are forged should be held in camera. It is for this body to apply the medicine now. In the opinion of this column, the first play is to sideline the controversy with Bailey’s protector-plus-everything else, Craig Butler. Butler should not be faulted, in all the to and fro so far, for setting his conditions for the release of the young baller. There is nothing inherently wrong in his asking for details of a programme that is requesting the input of the considerable skills with which his “son” is blessed. He undoubtedly played a sterling role in Leon mastering his craft and would not want it to fall on rough ground, there to wane and wither away. As it entails in a United States collegiate system, parents are invited on visits for them to get the lay of the land that their charges will call their home for an extended period. Come on JFF, for reasons already explained, Leon should be brought home to be a member of the country’s squad to participate in its next home game. Any fallout that occurs from putting Butler’s grievances on hold will, hopefully, be cooled by the energy and excitement the introduction of Leon can be expected to give to the nation’s football. – Send feedback to laurieFoster2012@gmail.com.last_img read more

Hope Amid Despair

first_imgIn the next few months, the Ebola virus disease (EVD), which has torn the country apart and brought excruciating pain and frustration upon citizens, will be a thing of the past, but its scars will live on forever in the minds and lives of Liberians. Many of the victims are children, some of them as young as 4 months old. Their lives have been altered and will forever be defined by the outbreak of this scourge.But light is beginning to show its face in the lives of some of these orphans from the northwestern part of the country, specifically Foya District in Lofa County. Many of these children may have lost their parents and other relatives, but all is not lost.Raise Your Hand Foundation (RYHF), a United States-based non-governmental organization which also has a local arm, is about to put smiles on the faces of orphans, who now number about 567 in Foya and its immediate surroundings.Lofa, especially Foya, was at one point considered the epicenter of the outbreak during the initial stage of the crisis.RYHF is working with a local organization, Makona Ebola Survivor Incorporated (MESI), a parent body that seeks the welfare of survivors and orphans in Foya, where it is headquartered, to provide scholarships for college age adults.  The organization is striving to find out how it can help some of these orphans get back into school.MESI operates a child welfare center where about 167 of these children, who lost both parents and have no relatives to care for them, reside. The rest of the 567 kids live with relatives in various communities.RYHF founder and president, Shelley Spurlock, in a communication to MESI’s president, Joseph Massaquoi, said her organization would like to expand its outreach to help some of the children get into school.RYHF Liberia’s country director, Alexander Ireland, had earlier led a team to Foya to search for an orphan, Sheku Gbollie, whose heartwarming story was reported in the October 23, 2014, edition of this newspaper.  RYHF is already providing a full scholarship to Sheku, who is currently studying at the Cuttington University in Suakoko, Bong County.The US-based organization is also partnering with a grade school in that county to raise funds for a post-Ebola scholarship program to assist with the Ebola orphans in Foya. Mrs. Spurlock said the initiative is intended to give hope to children who have lost almost everything. “The only thing we can do for them now is to give them hope for the future. When they are educated they will be able to look back and narrate their own stories,” she said. Mr. Massaquoi lauded RYHF for the initial steps and said that the children have lost everything and it is now in the reach of kind hearted people to show them love. “The best love you can show children, especially the vulnerable ones that we are dealing with now, is education.”Meanwhile, RYHF has also provided numerous scholarships to underprivileged Liberians, many of whom lost their parents during the Liberian civil war. Some of the beneficiaries have graduated from high school, while others are still attending various institutions of higher learning in the country.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Alberta Opposition Leader Jason Kenney says he would shelve oil by rail deal

first_imgHe suggested that oil companies would ship more oil by rail if it were profitable and called the NDP’s plan “corporate welfare.”Kenney also said Alberta can’t afford the deal right now, given its multibillion-dollar deficits and a debt projected to reach $96 billion by 2024.Notley, who was in Grande Prairie, Alta., for a methanol plant announcement, responded via a video on social media in which she accused Kenney of being an opportunistic flip-flopper.“A few weeks ago, he supported our government’s plan to move more crude by rail. But today, now, he’s suggesting he’s going to call up CP and CN and somehow try to scuttle the deal,” she said.Advertisement EDMONTON, A.B. – Opposition Leader Jason Kenney says if he wins the spring election, he will try to cancel Alberta’s $3.7-billion deal with Canada’s two largest railways to ship more oil by rail.“This (deal) is a catastrophic mistake by the NDP,” Kenney told a news conference Wednesday, one day after Premier Rachel Notley announced the province will lease 4,400 railcars to get more oil to foreign markets while the government works to increase pipeline capacity.Notley called the United Conservative leader’s plan irresponsible and arrogant.- Advertisement -Kenney said he will be contacting Canadian National Railway and Canadian Pacific Railway to urge them not to invest too much in the agreement given that it could be shelved if his United Conservatives win the vote.An election can be called any time now and by law must be concluded no later than the last day of May.“If elected, a United Conservative government will do everything within our power to cancel the NDP’s reckless $4-billion expenditure of borrowed tax dollars to interfere in the market,” said Kenney.Advertisement “I have to say I am shocked by how irresponsible of him this is. And I honestly expected more from someone putting forth their name to lead the province.”Notley has said the rail plan will net $2.2 billion for taxpayers, because the increased traffic is expected to boost commercial, royalty, and tax revenue by $5.9 billion.“It is a sensible, practical and profitable plan that is part of our job to stand up for Albertans,” the premier said in the video. “I am surprised that Mr. Kenney would choose to score political points over standing up for Albertans.“I’m also surprised that he has demonstrated such an unprecedented level of arrogance. Let me say this: whoever earns the privilege of leading this province in the future will do so after the votes are counted, not before.”Extra oil shipments by rail are to begin this summer and increase to an estimated 120,000 barrels per day by 2020.Advertisementcenter_img Of the 4,440 cars, more than three-quarters are to be new and the rest retrofitted.The province initially believed it would need 7,000 cars, but says it was able to lower that number because it found better routes to market.Notley said shipments of grain should not be disrupted by increased oil traffic on rail lines.Kenney has said a United Conservative government would review all contracts signed by the NDP since Feb. 1 to make sure they are good for Albertans.last_img read more

Real Madrid ‘interested’ in Liverpool goal machine Mohamed Salah – Egypt boss

first_imgReal Madrid are ‘interested’ in signing Liverpool’s goalscoring sensation Mohamed Salah, according to Egypt head coach Hector Cuper.Salah has been a revelation since his £37million move from Roma in the summer – scoring 17 goals in 21 appearances for his new club.It’s only December, but the 25-year-old has already scored more than each of Liverpool’s top scorers from their previous three seasons, and his incredible form has unsurprisingly attracted the gaze of Europe’s elite.Salah penned a five-year deal when he signed for the Reds in June but, according to his national team manager, Real Madrid are already looking to take him away from Anfield and are keeping an eye on his form in the Premier League.Speaking to Egyptian sports network ON Sport TV, Cuper said: “I’ve received confirmed news revealing Real Madrid’s interest in Salah, but let’s not rush things.“To me, he is in an amazing position right now.” Mohamed Salah has been in sensational form for Liverpool this season 1last_img read more