Arsenal star Aaron Ramsey gets emotional in Gunner’s last home match

first_imgAdvertisement 26iwNBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs7ohxjWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Elr( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) 9j1Would you ever consider trying this?😱24Can your students do this? 🌚7aRoller skating! Powered by Firework Aaron Ramsey has served Arsenal for 11 years and his time in the Gunners’ jersey will be over this season as the Welshman is set for a move to Italian giants Juventus in the summer.Advertisement The 28-year-old was in attendance for Arsenal’s last home match against Brighton & Hove Albion in the Premier League and spoke to the media after that.Advertisement “I’m very emotional. It’s been a hell of a journey. So much has happened in that. When I look back, you can hear in my voice how much it means to me. I’ve spent so many years here a boy at 17 years old and I leave here a man. So much has happened so I’m very grateful for the opportunity here.”When asked about the new challenge which he would face in the Serie A, Ramsey revealed that he is looking forward to it.Advertisement “Obviously, I’m very excited for the new challenge, the new chapter in my life. Today, is all about this, where I grew up, so I just want to take this in.”When asked what made him tick in Arsenal for so long years, Ramsey replied that it was the love and adulation of the fans.“There’s been highs and lows but the fans have stuck by me, so I’m very grateful.” Advertisementlast_img read more

Plenty of pluck

first_imgTEN-month-old Willow from Little Beacons Learning Centre enjoyed collecting autumn leaves last week as the centre prepared for its annual…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Places of worship targeted

first_imgBy Jessica Anstice Two men were charged following a string of alleged burglaries at places of worship across Melbourne, including in Berwick. It’s…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Islanders Women’s Tennis Falls at Texas-Arlington

first_imgThe Islanders will now return to the Thomas J. Henry Tennis Center on Saturday, March 14, with the women’s team opening Southland Conference play against Stephen F. Austin at 11 a.m. Texas-Arlington 4, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 2ARLINGTON, Texas – The Texas A&M-Corpus Christi women’s tennis team battled UT Arlington today in non-conference action at the UTA Tennis Center as the women’s team (6-4) fell 4-2 to the Mavericks. The women’s team (6-4) fell in singles play after the Mavs (7-3) secured four singles matches. The Islanders picked up singles wins on courts four and five with three-set wins but the Mavs were able to capture straight-set victories on the other four courts to garner the win.center_img Sophomore Judit Vives dropped a 6-2, 6-3 loss to Elizabeth Thoms in No. 1 singles to start the day before freshman Jelena Dzinic fell to Augustina Serio, 6-4, 6-1. The Mavs then padded their lead to 3-0 after junior Celia Rodriguez suffered her second loss of the season at No. 2 singles with a 6-5, 6-4 loss to Angeles de los Rios. The Islanders then tacked up their first win of the day after Maider Martin rose up and defeated Jessica Birowski in a three-setter. The junior cruised to a 6-0 first-set win before falling 7-5 in the second. In the third, she breezed to a 6-0 victory to put the Islanders on the board. UT Arlington then clinched the match after senior Chelsea Horan fell to Christine Foote, 7-5, 6-3 at No. 6 singles. When the match was clinched, Kerry Galhos was battling Ekaterina Tugarinova and secured a three-set win at No. 5 singles. She dropped the first set 7-5, before battling her way back to seal a 6-2 second-set win. In the third, Galhos fought her way to a 7-5 victory for the Islanders’ second point of the match.last_img read more

Woman appeals defeat in rape lawsuit against Derrick Rose

first_imgThe woman had been seeking $21.5 million in the suit that claimed the men gang raped her at home while she was incapacitated from booze or drugs and unable to consent to sex.“We combed the records, looked at the transcripts and I think the judge misapplied the rape shield law and, in doing so, abused his discretion,” the woman’s lawyer, Waukeen McCoy, told The Associated Press.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentRape shield laws limit or prohibit evidence of a victim’s past sexual history to be introduced in a case, though there are exceptions to the rule.McCoy said the judge should have excluded testimony by the Knicks point guard and his friends who said the woman willingly engaged in sex with them earlier in the evening at Rose’s house because it was irrelevant to the later incident. Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 NBA star Derrick Rose leaves federal court in Los Angeles Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. APLOS ANGELES, California—The ex-girlfriend who lost her lawsuit accusing NBA star Derrick Rose and two friends of raping her appealed the verdict Thursday on the grounds that damning testimony should have been excluded and other evidence should have been admitted at trial.Jurors cleared the Knicks point guard and his friends last month in Los Angeles federal court after they testified that the woman was coherent and willingly engaged in sex with them during an evening get-together at Rose’s rented mansion in Beverly Hills and again early the next morning at her apartment in August 2013.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Lawyers for Rose did not immediately return a message seeking comment.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol towncenter_img 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas The woman denied having sex with the men at the mansion. She said she drank shots of tequila by the pool, felt drugged and went home to her apartment, where she vomited and passed out.She said she awoke in the early morning to find the three men assaulting her in her bedroom.Jurors said they found the woman’s account hard to believe and didn’t think there was enough evidence to support her claims.Los Angeles police have an open investigation into the woman’s claims. The Associated Press does not generally name people who say they are victims of sex crimes.Rose’s lawyers have asked the judge to award $70,000 in court expenses because the defense prevailed at trial. In a court filing, his attorneys said they expected an appeal “which will be meritless, frivolous, and sanctionable.”ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes James Harden has 3rd triple-double, Rockets beat Blazers EDITORS’ PICK We are young Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise View commentslast_img read more

Can jurisdictional certification curb palm oil deforestation in Indonesia? (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Certification, Commentary, Commodity Roundtables, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Jurisdictional Approaches, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Researcher Perspectives Series, Saving Rainforests Collaborative Learning and Innovation at the District LevelThe challenges faced by the people of Seruyan and their natural environment cannot be solved alone by current supply chain certification approaches, including RSPO and ISPO certification. Here we highlight four challenges that prevent the sustainable and inclusive production of palm oil, including meeting RSPO certification requirements.Challenge 1: Some of the international methodologies for RSPO certification, such as “High Conservation Value Area” and “High Carbon Stock” assessments are not recognized by public agencies, that have their own approaches to conservation assessment. Hence, without integrating these concepts into the government approach, it will not lead to effective implementation by the government.INOBU and EII are currently supporting the district government to develop a district spatial and environmental management plan. The process involves the first district carrying capacity assessment, which is being supported by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and involves spatial modelling and ecological field surveys to establish hard restrictions on the conversion of native vegetation to other uses, and guidance for maintaining water supply and controlling fire and other risks. Revisions to the draft spatial plan have been proposed that include increased forest and peatland protection, areas for rehabilitation and a proposed wildlife corridor along the riparian areas, that will connect the main forest areas in the north and south of the district. The carrying capacity assessment is defined under Law No. 32/2009 on Environmental Protection and Management and is under the authority of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. This will also result in the jurisdiction-wide environmental protection plan, formalized by a district regulation or peraturan daerah, that will guide the implementation of environmental protection in the entire district. Seruyan will be the first district that has such documents.Challenge 2: The Government of Indonesia does not have a system for registering or monitoring smallholder farmers, making it difficult to develop programs for providing them with technical assistance or credit and undermining the traceability of supply chains. Through the work in the pilot districts, a plantation monitoring system known as SIPKEBUN, was developed by INOBU in conjunction with the Ministry of Agriculture and provincial and district governments. The system involves an innovative, integrated Android application for mapping plots and registering oil palm smallholders. The application has also been used for mapping and registering nutmeg producers in West Papua, and is planned to be expanded to other provinces and commodities in Indonesia. The Ministry of Agriculture is in the process of agreeing on using a modified version of the system for registering and issuing cultivation certificates for small-scale commodity producers across Indonesia.Challenge 3: Farming practices and productivity limited due to lack of effective rural extension and technical support for smallholders, lack of mechanism for companies to deliver financial contributions to farmers, and lack of business know-how.The PELITA Agricultural Facility was designed and launched in 2018, under the leadership of INOBU, to provide inputs, training and eventually credit to independent smallholders in Seruyan district. The facility is initially focused on oil palm smallholders before expanding to other commodities. The facility is an independent association comprised of representatives from the district government, agribusinesses and mills, and non-government organizations, including INOBU. Each of the members makes financial or in-kind contributions to support the activities of the facility. The facility is the first of its kind in Indonesia.Challenge 4: Current approach to Free Prior and Informed Consent is on a case-by-case basis when a more systemic approach is needed to address rural conflict across the entire District.A pilot initiative for implementing FPIC at the jurisdictional (district) level to resolve land conflicts has been launched. The FPIC mechanism will include a standard operating procedure for preventing and mediating conflicts, which will be supported by a district regulation and tied to the plantation monitoring system. The design is currently being discussed with the relevant non-government organizations, including the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP). This initiative is the first of its kind that we are aware of in Indonesia.Peat fire in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Jurisdictional authorityAlthough the legal framework and delegation of authority to district governments provide opportunities, they also limit the scope of what can be achieved by these governments. The main constraint on district governments in Indonesia in the context of jurisdictional certification is that the forest estate remains under the authority of provincial governments. District governments only have authority over the people who live in forest areas and can propose changes to the forest area. Ultimately, however, management authority for these areas resides with the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, devolved to the provincial level. District governments also have limited authority for revoking existing licenses that were responsible for causing social or environmental harm in the past.And, despite the ongoing efforts of the Indonesian government and the anti-corruption commission, corruption remains a persistent problem at all levels of government. A recent case in Seruyan District, where it is alleged plantation companies bribed provincial parliamentarians, demonstrates the challenges of working with governments in Indonesia. The actions of a few have the potential to tar the efforts of the many. At best, the jurisdictional certification process aims to improve the transparency and governance of the palm oil supply chain, reducing the opportunities for rent seeking behavior.Intact rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Don’t forget the landscapes for the jargonJurisdictional certification, in the right context, offers the potential of achieving inclusive and sustainable production of oil palm at a large scale. Jurisdictional certification also offers the clearest pathway for implementing landscape approaches to sustainable production that are strengthened by laws and regulations and embedded in multi-stakeholder, collective initiatives. Its effectiveness derives from its technocratic approach, although this type of approach may have limited appeal to consumers and other actors in the palm oil supply chain. The Seruyan pilot does not yet have a strong marketing component, although the potential should grow as the innovations described here are fully implemented. A good example of this is WWF Malaysia’s Living Landscape Program in Sabah, which promotes production, protection and restoration, while still contributing to the broader jurisdictional certification program.And, although jurisdictional certification is a promising approach for catalyzing innovative approaches for sustainable and inclusive production, there are many challenges. A global drop in palm oil prices, which has led to reduced demand for smallholder fresh fruit bunches, means that jurisdictional certification for palm oil, by itself, is not sufficient. Single commodity certification should be seen as the first step in a pathway towards a diversified, sustainable production landscape, which is resilient to market fluctuations.The new, stricter RSPO Principles and Criteria, especially related to no deforestation, also present challenges in their application at the jurisdictional level. Despite the general consensus that there is a need to reduce deforestation, some land clearing is necessary for agricultural production and infrastructure development. Zero net deforestation has been proposed as an alternative compromise, although how that will align with the new Principles and Criteria, and their application at the jurisdictional level, still needs to be discussed.On the flip side, there is a surprising lack of evidence that corporate zero deforestation pledges or RSPO certification as traditionally applied are having significant effects on regional deforestation trends in Indonesia. They are certainly not yet leading to regional, systemic approaches, embedded in public policies and regulations, to the issues of deforestation, land conflict and smallholder inclusion. The hope is that the jurisdictional approach can act as a bridge towards national level reforms.Finally, although the benefits of jurisdictional certification derive from the collective action from producers, governments and civil society, it also presents challenges. Two major challenges to jurisdictional certification are: finding appropriate mechanisms for sanctioning for non-compliant producers and equitably distributing the benefits of certification, including price premiums. These issues would need to be managed by a jurisdictional certification management entity, which would also be required to manage audits, and conversely, be capable of being audited.Despite these challenges, jurisdictional certification presents an opportunity and a model for protecting and restoring tropical landscapes while improving the welfare of farmers and protecting human rights. It takes sustainability standards to the right scale where issues such as wildlife corridors and riparian forests as well as systemic legal protections for human rights are possible. It also provides the incentives and mechanisms for collective action at the landscape scale, including partnerships with buyer and consumer goods companies as well as donors. Models such as these are needed if we are to reduce tropical deforestation and environmental degradation in the near future.John Watts is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Inovasi Bumi. Dan Nepstad is Executive Director & President at Earth Innovation Institute. Silvia Irawan is Executive Director at Inovasi Bumi. Acknowledgements: The work described in this Commentary was funded by grants from the Norwegian Development Agency (NORAD) and the German International Climate Initiative (IKI) to the Earth Innovation Institute, and grants from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation and the United National Environment Programme to INOBU.Disclosure: the authors are involved with efforts to implement a jurisdictional approach in Seruyan Regency.Citations:Hansen, M. C. et al. High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change. Science 342, 850–853 (2013).Gaveau, D. L. A. et al. Rise and fall of forest loss and industrial plantations in Borneo (2000–2017). Conserv. Lett. 0, e12622 (2018). In this commentary, Dan Nepstad of Earth Innovation Institute and John Watts and Silvia Irawan of Inovasi Bumi argue that the surge in oil palm expansion in Indonesia since the early 2000s has caused deforestation, environmental degradation and social conflicts; strategies to reduce these negative impacts have seen only modest success.The authors say the jurisdictional certification pilots of the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) represent a promising new approach to these issues. The RSPO pilot in Seruyan — a district that has experienced many of these problems — has led to several innovations, including an agricultural facility that provides technical support to smallholders while managing funds received from companies, implementation of the “jurisdiction-wide environmental protection plan” regulation, a mechanism for resolving land conflicts, and a method for mapping and registering independent smallholders.Deforestation may be on the decline in Seruyan, with the exception of the El Niño related fires of 2015 and 2016. Through jurisdictional certification, there is the potential to protect 480 thousand hectares of standing forests and restore 420 thousand hectares of forests.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The fall of the Suharto regime and the beginning of the democratic or reformasi era in Indonesia coincided with a massive surge in deforestation. One of the central reasons for this surge was the decentralization of authority for land and forest management to the district level in the early 2000s. Local governments were both ill-prepared and unequipped to deal with this sudden delegation of responsibility. Plantation companies, eager to expand their holdings, were able to benefit from this new political environment, which consequently led to the massive expansion of plantation areas. The environmental and social consequences of this mostly unmanaged and unplanned expansion were extensive, and the effects of this era continue until today.The rapid expansion of oil palm plantations during this era cemented the negative impression of oil palm in the minds of activists, non-government organizations and consumers around the world. Oil palm, in itself, is neither good nor bad. As one of the most efficient oil crops in the world, its derivatives are used in a seemingly endless array of products, from cooking oils to cosmetics and confectionary, to biofuel. Consequently, it is the best placed crop to meet the increasing global demand for consumer goods while minimizing the expansion into forest areas. Despite these advantages, it remains one of the most maligned crops in existence today.Although the negative social and environmental effects of oil palm expansion reflect a failure of decentralized governance, local governments have not yet been a major part of the efforts to solve the problem. Governments were notably absent from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, formed in 2004 to promote the sustainable production and use of palm oil, and its certification systems. Since 2010, zero deforestation pledges from producer and buyer companies became a trend, including business groups such as the Consumer Goods Forum, followed by governments in developed countries, through commitments such as the Amsterdam Declaration in 2015. Many companies set a date of 2020 as the target for zero deforestation supply chains. With just a few months until 2020, most of these pledges are unlikely to be met. There are many reasons that these commitments have been challenging to implement, including: splitting the market, deepening rural food insecurity and poverty, penalizing farmers and farm businesses who are striving to comply with the law, antagonizing governments and farmers in target regions, and creating too many new requirements for producers and processors, to name a few.As the Indonesian government became more sensitive to the effects of environmental campaigns on the production and sale of their palm oil, they issued several policies for reducing deforestation, including issuing a moratorium on plantation expansion and the Indonesian Sustainable Palm Oil certification system (ISPO). These initiatives, however, did not extend down to local governments.Recently, the potential role of local governments as key actors in solving deforestation has been highlighted. Here we present one pathway for engaging local governments through the example of a pilot of RSPO jurisdictional certification in Central Kalimantan. We demonstrate how jurisdictional certification has been used as a collaborative pathway for overcoming the obstacles to sustainability and catalyzing regulatory and institutional innovations.Orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park. Parts of the park in Seruyan were allocated for oil palm plantations. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Jurisdictional CertificationThe jurisdictional approach to the certification of palm oil in practice refers to the application of the RSPO Principles and Criteria at the level of the jurisdiction. Ideally, it should simplify and reduce the costs of certification thus expanding RSPO coverage while improving social and environmental outcomes. All actors in the palm oil supply chain, from independent smallholders, medium to industrial scale plantations, mills, traders and transporters should be covered. The central challenge of the approach is how to simplify, expand and reduce the costs of implementing the Principles and Criteria without diluting them.Jurisdictional certification is still in the pilot phase, with three ongoing pilots in Ecuador, the State of Sabah, Malaysia, and the district of Seruyan in the Province of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The first of these pilots, Sabah, was first announced in 2015, followed shortly by Seruyan and Ecuador, meaning that the processes are still in their infancy. The diversity of jurisdictional scales reveals one of the most important constraining–and enabling–aspects of jurisdictional certification: the level of government responsible for jurisdictional certification relates to its level of devolved or decentralized authority. Whereas in Malaysia, which is a federation, states have the relevant authority, in the case of Indonesia, a unitary republic, districts have the most relevant decentralized authority. As the role of sub-national governments are central to the implementation of jurisdictional certification, the Principles and Criteria should be implemented in the context of the prevailing laws and regulations, where possible. This translation between voluntary principles and criteria and legal frameworks will never be precise.Most importantly, jurisdictional certification is also a collaborative effort by local governments, producers and civil society organizations, supported by donors and buyers, to meet sustainable and inclusive palm oil standards. It is a collective effort, driven by democratic governments, to improve the sustainability of production for the benefit for both producers and the citizens of the jurisdiction. It requires the support by various different stakeholders including the private sector and this has started to be seen by the direct involvement by companies willing to pilot the concept. Unilever has been supporting various jurisdictional sustainability approaches including with Yayasan Penelitian Inovasi Bumi (INOBU) in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia and with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Sabah, Malaysia in effort to go beyond the typical supply chain certification schemes and work at a jurisdictional level to drive sustainable production and protection of a landscape. This approach differs from the prevailing approaches that seek to apply externally determined criteria to tropical jurisdictions. The costs of certification are also shared among the different parties so that the financial burden is not on tropical governments and their constituents alone.We discuss how this collaborative approach has been implemented in practice through the example of Seruyan District.Newly established oil palm plantation in Central Kalimantan. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Seruyan, A Palm Oil DistrictSince the beginning of decentralization in Indonesia, Seruyan District has, in many regards, represented the worst aspects of the palm oil boom in Indonesia. Consequently, it also provides a good model of how to stop and even reverse the socially and environmentally detrimental aspects of oil palm expansion.Located in the province of Central Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo, the district has experienced extensive land use change in its southern and central regions since the 1990s. Initially driven by forestry concessions, the decentralization of authority to district governments in the 2000s led to an allocation of oil palm plantations in the central part of Seruyan district. The allocation of oil palm concessions led to further deforestation and dispossession of local and indigenous farmers. The backlash to this plantation development led to the election of a district head, who, in part, campaigned on a platform calling for socially inclusive oil palm development. In 2015, the former head of Seruyan district, Sudarsono, declared his commitment for the district to become one of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil’s pilot jurisdictions for jurisdictional certification. Since then, the district has begun a comprehensive program of activities for promoting sustainable and inclusive oil palm production and has not approved any new oil palm concessions but instead has focused on supporting smallholders. With the exception of fire-related forest loss during the severely dry El Niño years, deforestation and forest degradation has largely stabilized in the district (Figure 1), with forestry operations in the northern part of the district responsible for most of the ongoing forest degradation. Although there are extensive forest areas in the north of the district, as well as forests in the south, especially in the protected areas, there is no connectivity between these forests, largely caused by the establishment of oil palm plantations in the central part of the district (Figure 2).Figure 1: Deforestation in Seruyan district from 2001 to 2017. The chart shows the rates of deforestation in Seruyan district based on data from the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry as well as from Hansen and others. The spike in deforestation in the period of 2015 to 2016 was caused by fires that were exacerbated by the El Niño event during that period.Figure 2: Land cover change in Seruyan District from 1990 to 2016 based on data from the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.last_img read more

Bolsonaro’s Brazil: 2020 could see revived Amazon mining assault — part two

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Biodiversity Hotspots, Conflict, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Illegal Mining, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Murdered Activists, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img President Michel Temer issued a presidential decree in 2017 to open up the vast 4.6 million hectare (17,800 square mile) RENCA preserve in the northern Amazon to mining. Meeting with a firestorm of criticism he abandoned the effort. Sources now say the Bolsonaro administration is poised to quietly revive plans to open RENCA in 2020.Likewise, with Bolsonaro in charge, transnational mining companies are pushing for a change in Brazilian law allowing the firms to mine inside protected lands and indigenous reserves across the nation. The change could be introduced in 2020 via the mining law, a bill long stalled in Congress.Should mines in RENCA and elsewhere go ahead, transport will be needed. The planned Ferrovia Pará railway (Fepasa) would move commodities from Pará state’s interior for river transport to the coast. Other plans call for 20+ new river ports, 2 thermoelectric power stations, and a transmission line crossing Pará.However, all these major projects face a legal hurdle. The Brazilian Constitution states that no major measure can be authorized allowing mining in indigenous areas, or large new infrastructure projects approved before prerequisites are satisfied, including consent of affected indigenous and traditional communities. An industrial mining operation in Brazil. Note the forest at the edge of the open pit mine. Photo credit: Norsk Hydro ASA via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SAFor decades, since the end of the military dictatorship in 1985, Brazil’s government has struggled to strike a balance in the Amazon between moneyed ruralist interests allied with transnational agribusiness and mining companies, and their opposition — indigenous peoples, conservationists, and traditional riverine, minority and landless communities.But Jair Bolsonaro’s government is proving to be a game changer — an administration uninterested in balance or compromise, and seeming not to care about world opinion or reputation, going its own way. It has already approved, or is moving toward approving, a slate of initiatives aimed at deregulating the environment and cancelling out many social gains, while generating an unprecedented expansion of land grabbing, agribusiness and industrial mining.This is the second of two articles in which Mongabay surveys examples of key measures carried out so far, along with what may lay ahead. The first article concentrated on land grabbing and agribusiness, the main focus in this story is the administration’s alliance with mining interests.Forest and topsoil must be removed before ore can be mined at Brazil’s Norsk Hydro ASA Paragominas open pit mine. Photo credit: Norsk Hydro ASA via VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SA.Opening RENCAWhen President Michel Temer issued a presidential decree in August 2017 to open up the vast 4.6 million hectare (17,800 square mile) RENCA preserve in the northern Amazon to mining, he met with a firestorm of criticism. RENCA (the National Copper and Associated Reserve) is in Amapá, Brazil’s most northern state, where it borders on Pará. The military set it up in 1984, not to protect the rainforest but to stop transnational mining companies from plundering the country’s resources.But RENCA’s establishment served conservation needs anyway. Almost all of it (95 percent) is protected today, with seven conservation units and two indigenous reserves. Only 0.3 percent has been deforested, making it one of the Amazon’s most intact rainforests. So it wasn’t surprising that environmentalists were outraged by Temer’s sudden move.The roar of national and global disapproval caused a federal judge to annul Temer’s decree, ruling that Brazil’s 1988 constitution did not permit the preserve to be abolished by the president, but only through legislative action.Now, with the ruralists more powerful than ever in Congress and Bolsonaro running things, observers say it is only a matter of time before the government teams up with mining interests to have another go. Indications are, according to Mongabay sources, that they are preparing to act early in 2020.RENCA is a tantalizing prize. The mineral wealth lying beneath its pristine forests is mind-boggling, with estimated reserves of gold, iron, phosphate, titanium, manganese, niobium and tantalum. “Studies carried out in the 1970s said that [RENCA’s] minerals were worth US$1 trillion,” Senator Lucas Barreto, a chief advocate of opening up the preserve, told the El Pais newspaper. “Imagine how much that is in today’s values.”Although the generals in power in the early 1980s adopted nationalist policies, particularly in industry, they were also keen to attract foreign mining companies. The creation of RENCA was in some ways an exception. According to the BBC, the British mining company, BP, wanted to mine RENCA, but Rear Admiral Roberto Gama e Silva, a staunch nationalist, told the powerful National Security Council that ceding the mining rights to BP might further the interests of the American, Daniel Ludwig, then one of the richest men in the world, who was at that time opening the Jari agro-industrial project nearby. As a result, mining’s entrée into RENCA was vetoed.A satellite view of the Carajás iron mine in Pará state near the city of Marabá. It is run by Brazil’s Vale mining company. Mining, if not properly managed, can do significant environmental and social harm, polluting rivers and groundwater, deforesting large areas, and displacing indigenous and traditional communities. Image courtesy of NASAMining companies have been lobbying since then to end this prohibition, with Canadian firms, in particular, eager to get access to RENCA. Sen. Barreto recently revealed that Bolsonaro has told him that a new version of Temer’s RENCA decree is being prepared. Other presidential sources confirm that action will be taken soon.There will, again, undoubtedly be protests. “Everyone I have spoken to is horrified at the prospect of abolishing RENCA,” said Randolfe Rodrigues, leader of the Senate opposition, while in Madrid for the COP25 climate summit in December. It seems likely, too, that once again the legality of the decree will be challenged in court, where the outcome is uncertain.People who know the region well are worried about the impact, not only from the mines, but from the collateral damage that opening up RENCA will do to indigenous communities, traditional populations and the forest. “To gain access to most of the minerals, they’ll have to create a new logistics, with roads, railways, electric energy,” said Décio Yokota, assistant executive of the not-for-profit Institute for Research and Indigenous Training (IEPÉ).The Bolsonaro government has already made behind the scenes efforts to fast track the long delayed Manaus-Boa Vista powerline through the Waimiri-Atroari Indigenous Territory that would supply electricity from the Tucurui hydroelectric dam to new mines and energy-hungry ore processing plants in RENCA. A proposal floated seemingly out of leftfield at the start of the administration to extend the BR-163 north to the Surinam border could be part of the plan too, though not directly linked to the opening up of RENCA, which is located much farther to the east.Yokata says that large-scale infrastructure projects like those being considered for RENCA leave only desolation in their wake. “Big hydroelectric dams and mining companies destroy, exploit, extract and leave — and when they leave, they leave nothing behind but their destruction. They don’t generate local wealth,” he said. Instead, he said, the government should invest in sustainable projects that don’t destroy the forest.Mines produce massive amounts of waste, much of it toxic. That waste comes in solid form, as slag, and also in liquid, which must be stored in pools behind dams. The conservation of rainforest within indigenous reserves would be incompatible with industrial mining. Photo by James Martins licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported licenseThousands of mining claims already mappedMeanwhile, with Bolsonaro in charge, mining companies are pushing for a change in Brazilian law that would allow them not only to mine in one preserve, however large and rich, but also on protected and indigenous land throughout the nation. Such a change could be introduced via the mining law long stalled in Congress.However, a serious legal hurdle stands in the way. The Brazilian Constitution states that no measure can be authorized to allow mining in indigenous areas before a series of prerequisites are satisfied, including the consent of the affected communities.According to the jurist and former president of the indigenous agency, FUNAI, Carlos Marés, this means that all indigenous people in Brazil must be consulted, in accordance with the guidelines established in the International Labor Organization’s Convention 169, of which Brazil is a signatory. In practice, such approval would seem remote or even impossible.The government has not yet indicated how it intends to resolve this conundrum. Even so, the National Agency of Mining (ANM), the body responsible for Brazilian mining, has accepted initial proposals from companies for mining in 48 indigenous territories, concessions whose borders have been well mapped.In late November, the Public Federal Ministry (MPF), a group of federal and state independent litigators, called on the ANM to throw out these proposals until the legal requirements under the Constitution have been met. The ANM argued in return that it can authorize initial studies, provided that the mining itself doesn’t begin until all legal demands are satisfied.The MPF disagrees, saying that these advance claims indirectly help the mining companies. “Even though these legal procedures don’t by themselves cause socio-environmental damage, they help produce a raft of ‘documents’ that create the appearance of legality for artisanal mining,” stated the MPF. “These documents are used on the ground as a means of keeping the [artisanal] mine[s] open, recruiting laborers, contracting services and even deceiving the Indians.”According to the Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA), an NGO, mining companies have registered 3,347 requests for mining rights in seven Amazonian states — Acre, Maranhão, Mato Grosso, Pará, Rondônia, Roraima and Tocantins. They involve 131 reserves. The lion’s share of the claims are in Pará state, with 2,266 requests.The 554 mile Carajás railroad that annually hauls 120 million tons of iron ore from the huge Carajás iron mine in Pará state to the port of Ponta da Madeira in Maranhão state. If Bolsonaro’s plan to open RENCA and indigenous reserves to mining goes forward, then many new miles of track will be needed for commodities transport. Image courtesy of MA10.Infrastructure to prepare the wayShould those mines go forward, they, like agribusiness, will require transport, particularly railways. In that regard, on 12 November, the Pará state government signed a memorandum of understanding to carry out a viability study for the Ferrovia Pará railway, known as Fepasa.Fepasa would run in a roughly north-south direction, from Parauapebas in southeast Pará, through the town of Marabá on the Tocantins River, to the municipality of Barcarena just west of Belém near the Brazilian coast. The government’s aim: use Fepasa to transport ore and soy from the state’s interior for export via transatlantic vessels through the Amazon River estuary. Construction is slated to begin in 2021, but as yet, none of the impacted indigenous communities have been consulted as required by ILO Convention 169.The railway is just one component of an ambitious infrastructure master plan to expand the region’s logistic capacity; those plans include the building of at least 20 new river ports, two thermoelectric power stations, and a transmission line running across Pará from north to south. It seems certain that the state’s rainforest could not long survive such an onslaught.João Gomes, assistant director for the Amazonia Program for the Federation of Organs for Social and Educational Assistance (FASE), agrees that mining and agribusiness concentrate income with wealthy elites while having very serious socio-environmental impacts.Here too governmental development plans face obstacles, especially environmental regulations. To get round those blocks, the administration is pushing a new bill (PL 3,729) through Congress. It would simplify the environmental evaluation and approval process, collapsing the present three-phase licensing process into just one. Such fast track bills have been produced before, but never to such a cooperative ruralist Congress.An indigenous family in Brazil from the Tucuxi group. Image by Fábio Rodrigues Pozzebom / ABr CC BY 3.0 br.Attacking science and indigenous peoplesThe government is attacking the Amazon on other fronts too. Key scientific research bodies, such as the National Institute of Amazonia Research (INPA), and the Emilio Goeldi Museum in Pará, whose studies at times urged authorities to adopt tougher forest protection measures, have had their budgets severely reduced under Bolsonaro.“Without being able to contract new staff to replace the large number of people who are retiring, our [scientific] institutions are losing brains, productive capacity, communication capacity and training expertise,” said Ana Luísa Albernaz, the Goeldi Museum director.Archaeologists, too, are facing dramatic funding cuts which will jeopardize their work documenting the Amazon’s rich indigenous prehistory and stopping them from salvaging relics — also, importantly, those cuts prevent digs that could give cause for slowing infrastructure and mining projects.The Bolsonaro administration has already weakened IBAMA and ICMBio, Brazil’s two main environmental protection agencies, and it has also taken steps to render FUNAI, the country’s indigenous affairs agency, virtually inoperative. Even though weakened in recent years, FUNAI had continued to provide invaluable support to indigenous communities and slowly carried on demarcating indigenous reserves.All that is ending now. A serious blow for the agency was Bolsonaro’s decision in July to appoint Marcelo Augusto Xavier da Silva, a former police officer with strong connections to agribusiness, as FUNAI president.Many indigenous leaders were horrified at the time, fearing that his appointment would sound the death knell for the agency. Today it seems their fears were justified.In November, the Brazilian Association of Anthropologists (ABA) issued a press release in which it charged that FUNAI is now selecting personnel “without the minimum qualifications and legitimacy” to identify and demarcate indigenous land.One example cited by ABA is the dismantling of two groups set up to identify and demarcate land for the Tuxi and the Pankará indigenous peoples, both inhabiting Pernambuco state in Brazil’s northeast. Bolsonaro’s FUNAI demanded, ABA said, that highly qualified people already chosen to staff those groups be replaced by “trustworthy anthropologists,” code it appears for people who the government trusts to do its bidding, according to critics.Wajāpi indigenous people. The Bolsonaro government has largely disempowered FUNAI, Brazil’s indigenous affairs agency. Image courtesy of Agência Brasil.In November, da Silva told FUNAI staff they were banned from visiting land that was in the process of being demarcated, thus barring them from carrying out the verification process that is their charter under the Constitution.The Estado de S. Paulo newspaper strongly criticized this instruction, saying that “The decision, besides being at odds with FUNAI’s basic mission, which is to act in defense of indigenous rights, also infringes indigenous rights as set out in federal legislation.”In December, FUNAI started replacing the heads of its regional posts. Eight new coordinators have been appointed so far. A retired Army colonel was chosen to head the office in Dourados in Mato Grosso do Sul, a state where there has been indigenous unrest and a high indigenous suicide rate for many years, likely due to the government’s failure to recognize the lands rights of the Guarani-Kaiowá. A former military officer has also been appointed to head the FUNAI office in Humaitá in Amazonas state. New FUNAI heads are expected to be appointed to all 39 regional offices by the end of January, 2020.However, the new FUNAI president hasn’t been getting it all his own way. Indigenous organizations have been campaigning continuously and effectively in Brasilia against a proposed constitutional amendment (PEC 215/00) which would transfer authority for demarcating indigenous land from the executive branch, with FUNAI carrying out the studies and the Justice Ministry approving them, to the ruralist-dominated Congress.PEC 215/00 also includes the so-called “marco temporal,” which would establish an arbitrary cut-off date of 1988 as the year when indigenous groups must have been living on land for that property to be recognized today as theirs. In addition, it requires that non-indigenous Brazilians claiming and living on indigenous lands be paid compensation for any losses, not just for assets but also for the land itself, if forced to leave it.Congress, through strongly ruralist, is still divided on the marco temporal issue, which requires a two-thirds majority to pass. Voting was postponed twice this year due to vociferous protests held in Brasília by indigenous people and quilombolas, communities of runaway slave descendants.But far from the federal capital, Indians are paying a heavy price for the impunity with which land grabbers and landowners have operated this year. Seven indigenous leaders were assassinated in 2019, making it the deadliest year for indigenous leaders in two decades. Many analysts believe that things will only get worse in the years ahead if, and when, the mining companies move in.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Country comes first! – Quarrie questions McPherson’s withdrawal after bust-up with teammate

first_img “It (argument) started with a uniform thing, and I don’t remember exactly why, because when it was beginning, I made sure I got in there to keep things normal. It escalated a little bit, but the main thing I was concerned about was keeping them apart,” said Quarrie. The event was won by the United States in 3:19.02, with Great Britain and Northern Ireland running second in 3:25.00 and Poland third in 3:25.41. Quarrie is calling for stricter guidelines where national representation is concerned and says he will be submitting his proposals to the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association. “Part of it is that there are not enough guidelines,” Quarrie said. “Guidelines are going to have to be set up and enforced and athletes are going to have to understand that if you are not prepared to step up to the line, you can be replaced even if it means we are not going to win. “We have to start somewhere as it relates to certain disciplinary means of making sure our athletes realise when it comes to the country, especially with the relays, the country comes first.” LONDON, England: Donald Quarrie, the technical leader of Jamaica’s team to the just-concluded World Championships in London, is questioning the reasons behind Stephenie-Ann McPherson’s withdrawal from the women’s mile relay team. He has called for stronger guidelines for national representation. McPherson was withdrawn from the women’s 4x400m relay team just before they took the track for the final, following an altercation with MVP teammate Shericka Jackson. Anneisha McLaughlin-Whilby was brought in to replace McPherson and the line-up was completed with Chrisann Gordon, Jackson and Novlene Williams-Mills. McLaughlin-Whilby, however, suffered a leg injury 100m into her second-leg run before crashing to the ground and ending the Jamaicans’ hopes of defending their title. Quarrie, however, raised questions about McPherson’s withdrawal, noting that the athlete threatened not to compete in the mile relay during her spat with Jackson while at the team hotel. Quarrie noted that upon arrival at the warm-up track soon afterwards, he was told by coach Paul Francis that McPherson would no longer be able to compete because she was injured. In addition to being a part of the national coaching setup here, Paul Francis is a coach at MVP and is the brother of MVP head coach Stephen Francis. “My main issue right now is the fact that one young lady said she was not going to run, suddenly. I show up at the track and her coach is telling me she has an injury and will not be able to run. The doctor did check with her and said it was a grade one something – I can’t remember what it is – but I find it very strange that between the hotel and here (warm-up track), an injury could have occurred,” said Quarrie. “I am not going to put the blame on the young lady only. The coach is the one that said she cannot run, just as he said Elaine could not run. He gave me a reason that Elaine did not run in practice to the extent which he wanted should in case she had to push herself. She had not done that, so it was his decision,” Quarrie continued before sharing the circumstances around the altercation between the athletes. “There was a verbal altercation between herself and Shericka. She (McPherson) said it (that she would not run). I told her not to say so and that we should move on. In the heat of everything, I could forgive the young lady, but I would like to know why, in such a short space of time, I show up at the track, and she is not running,” said Quarrie, who, without going into details, shared that the argument started because of uniforms. ALTERCATION ESCALATEDlast_img read more

LeBron James no longer King James for Hong Kong protesters

first_imgLATEST STORIES James’ standing among basketball fans in Hong Kong took a hit because of comments the NBA star made about free speech. Fans gathered on courts amid Hong Kong’s high-rise buildings Tuesday to vent their anger.The player for the Los Angeles Lakers touched a nerve among protesters for suggesting that free speech can have negative consequences. They have been protesting for months in defense of the same freedom that James said can carry “a lot of negative.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4The protesters chanted support for Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey, something of a hero among demonstrators in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory for having tweeted in support of their struggle, infuriating authorities in China.What the crowd of approximately 200 people chanted about James wasn’t printable. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Part 3 takes you straight to hell with a Music Video and First Look-Images Francis Kong, Jason Magbanua headline ‘The School for the Passionate, New Bold U 2020’ MOST READ “People are angry,” said James Lo, a web designer who runs a Hong Kong basketball fan page on Facebook. He said he’s already received a video from a protester that showed him burning a No. 23 jersey bearing James’ name.He expects more, given the backlash from protesters who’ve been regularly hitting the streets of Hong Kong and battling police because of concerns that the international business hub is slowly losing its freedoms, which are unique in China.“Students, they come out like every weekend. They’ve got tear gassed and then they got gun-shot, like every weekend. Police beating students and then innocent people, like every day. And then he (James) just comes up with something (like) that. We just can’t accept that.”James made his comments in response to a question about whether Morey should be punished for his tweet that reverberated in China and had consequences for the NBA.“Yes, we do have freedom of speech,” James said. “But at times, there are ramifications for the negative that can happen when you’re not thinking about others, when you only think about yourself.”ADVERTISEMENT No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist Demonstrators watch as a Lebron James jersey burns during a rally at the Southorn Playground in Hong Kong, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. Protesters in Hong Kong have thrown basketballs at a photo of LeBron James and chanted their anger about comments the Los Angeles Lakers star made about free speech during a rally in support of the NBA and Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey, whose tweet in support of the Hong Kong protests touched off a firestorm of controversy in China. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)HONG KONG — When the ball smashed into a photo of LeBron James’ face stuck above the hoop and dropped into the basket, the Hong Kong protesters cheered.They also trampled on jerseys bearing his name and gathered in a semicircle to watch one burn.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Taal Volcano island 2 days after eruptioncenter_img View comments Taal Volcano eruption: House to develop rehab plan for Batangas, Cavite, Laguna Negros Occidental gov’t, church call for prayers for safety of Taal evacuees Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down He added: “So many people could have been harmed, not only financially but physically, emotionally, spiritually. So just be careful what we tweet and what we say and what we do. Even though yes, we do have freedom of speech, it can be a lot of negative that comes with it.”Protesters said James’ comments smacked of a double-standard, because he’s used his clout as a sports headliner to press for social causes in the United States.“Please remember, all NBA players, what you said before: ‘Black lives matter.’ Hong Kong lives also matter!” one of the protesters, 36-year-old office worker William Mok, said in addressing the applauding crowd.Others said LeBron’s comments made it seem that he’s more worried about money than people.“James was trying, you know, to take a side, on the China side, which is like ridiculous,” said Aaron Lee, a 36-year-old marketing director. “He was being honest, financially. Financial is money. Simple as that. LeBron James stands for money. Period.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Philippines holds higher-ranked China to goalless draw in World Cup Qualifying Christmas Eve chaos in Hong Kong as police and protesters clash PLAY LIST 01:17Christmas Eve chaos in Hong Kong as police and protesters clash01:07Hong Kong marks Christmas Eve with mall clashes and tear gas01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:04Daybreak as smoke, ash billows from Taal volcano01:05Poor visibility, nakaapekto sa maraming lugar sa Batangas03:028,000 pulis sa Region 4-A, tuloy ang trabaho03:57Phivolcs, nahihirapan sa komunikasyon sa Taal01:04Sold-out: Stores run out of face masks after Taal spews ash01:45Iran police shoot at those protesting plane shootdown Andray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai Sottolast_img read more

China to cut foreign football player numbers on pitch

first_imgPreviously four non-Chinese players were allowed, provided one was from an Asian Football Confederation country. The decision would be “advantageous for the overall development of Chinese football, advantageous for the cultivation of Chinese local footballers and advantageous for raising the level of China’s national team,” the CFA said.The organisation also said it would act to rein in the “recent appearance of irrational investments and the payment of high transfer fees and salaries for domestic and foreign footballers”.The decision comes in the middle of the winter transfer window, which began January 1, and could disrupt some deals already in the works.Big business backers of Chinese Super League clubs, encouraged by football fan President Xi Jinping’s vision of China becoming one of the game’s superpowers, hosting and winning a World Cup, have lavished money on their teams alongside heavy investment in grassroots development.China last month broke the Asian transfer record for the fifth time in a year when Shanghai SIPG paid Chelsea 60 million euros ($63 million) for Brazilian midfielder Oscar.At the same time across the city, Shanghai Shenhua were reportedly making Argentina’s former Manchester United and Manchester City striker Carlos Tevez the world’s highest-salaried player.The two were the latest in a stream of foreign players — many from South America — flowing into China in recent years in return for eye-watering wages.But Chelsea manager Antonio Conte Sunday dismissed there was a Chinese bid for Costa.“I don’t know anything about this (offer from China). The club did not inform me about this. That can be only speculation,” he said after his Premier League leaders beat Leicester 3-0 without Costa, who was omitted amid reports of an argument with fitness coach Julio Tous and interest from clubs in China.Football fans and authorities fear the influx of foreign talent will come at the cost of potential homegrown heroes, preferring that hefty sums be reserved for nurturing local talent.China, ranked 82nd in the world, punch well below their weight in international competition, having qualified only once for the World Cup finals, in 2002, where they failed to win a match or score a goal.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Shanghai SIPG paid Chelsea 60 million euros for Brazilian midfielder Oscar (C) © AFP/File / STRBeijing, China, Jan 16 – China said Monday it will cut foreign player numbers in top-flight teams to curb massive spending on overseas talent, with Chelsea’s Diego Costa the latest to be linked to a big-money move.Teams in the Chinese Super League will be able to field no more than three foreigners in a match when the new 2017 season begins in March, according to new rules posted on the Chinese Football Association website.last_img read more