Ayo experiments with La Salle 5 in rout of UST

first_imgBrad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town “We’ve been thinking about it for a while, but for coach Aldin to put us all in there shows the versatility our coach gives us. No limits,” said Tratter.“Coach likes to try out new things,” said Mbala, who anchored the five on the floor that flaunted La Salle’s depth in a 99-56 whipping of the Growling Tigers Sunday. “I think that was just a way for him to check if the five of us could jell and run the plays.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentThe result of the five-man unit hardly mattered, with the game already decided as early as the first half.Showing grit like the champions they aspire themselves to be, the Green Archers picked themselves up from the Growling Tigers’ 10-5 start and proceeded to manhandle their foes, establishing a 45-23 halftime lead and extending the advantage to as high as 46, 93-47, late in the game. EDITORS’ PICK BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise The 43-point blowout, the most lopsided win this season, is also a perfect example of the Archers’ dominance this year, that even with its opponents’ best punches, it will still find a way to rise through adversity.Mbala topped the Green Archers 21 points, 15 rebounds, and five blocks, while Jeron Teng got 16 markers, four boards, and three assists.La Salle secured a twice-to-beat advantage and is poised to sweep its remaining games in the elimination round with University of the East, Ateneo, and Far Eastern University left in its UAAP Season 79 schedule.But more scary for the field is the untapped potential Ayo hasn’t discovered in his deep roster. Ayo and his coaching staff are still looking for other weapons on its already loaded arsenal.“Gusto naming ipakita yung pwede pang gawin ng team na ito. Yung unpredictability na gusto ni coach, dapat palaging nandyan,” said assistant coach Louie Gonzales, as Ayo refused to face the media after the rout.ADVERTISEMENT We are young For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Finally! A Cubs team that ain’t afraid of no ghosts Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas MOST READ Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netCoaching the deepest team in the league in La Salle, head coach Aldin Ayo has a lot of options in terms of who he wants to play on the floor.During the Green Archers’ rout of University of Santo Tomas, Ayo fielded in a towering five of Ben Mbala, Abu Tratter, Jason Perkins, Mark Dyke, and Julian Sargent for the first time this season.ADVERTISEMENT Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 View commentslast_img read more

Woman appeals defeat in rape lawsuit against Derrick Rose

first_imgThe woman had been seeking $21.5 million in the suit that claimed the men gang raped her at home while she was incapacitated from booze or drugs and unable to consent to sex.“We combed the records, looked at the transcripts and I think the judge misapplied the rape shield law and, in doing so, abused his discretion,” the woman’s lawyer, Waukeen McCoy, told The Associated Press.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentRape shield laws limit or prohibit evidence of a victim’s past sexual history to be introduced in a case, though there are exceptions to the rule.McCoy said the judge should have excluded testimony by the Knicks point guard and his friends who said the woman willingly engaged in sex with them earlier in the evening at Rose’s house because it was irrelevant to the later incident. Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 NBA star Derrick Rose leaves federal court in Los Angeles Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. APLOS ANGELES, California—The ex-girlfriend who lost her lawsuit accusing NBA star Derrick Rose and two friends of raping her appealed the verdict Thursday on the grounds that damning testimony should have been excluded and other evidence should have been admitted at trial.Jurors cleared the Knicks point guard and his friends last month in Los Angeles federal court after they testified that the woman was coherent and willingly engaged in sex with them during an evening get-together at Rose’s rented mansion in Beverly Hills and again early the next morning at her apartment in August 2013.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Lawyers for Rose did not immediately return a message seeking comment.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol towncenter_img 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas The woman denied having sex with the men at the mansion. She said she drank shots of tequila by the pool, felt drugged and went home to her apartment, where she vomited and passed out.She said she awoke in the early morning to find the three men assaulting her in her bedroom.Jurors said they found the woman’s account hard to believe and didn’t think there was enough evidence to support her claims.Los Angeles police have an open investigation into the woman’s claims. The Associated Press does not generally name people who say they are victims of sex crimes.Rose’s lawyers have asked the judge to award $70,000 in court expenses because the defense prevailed at trial. In a court filing, his attorneys said they expected an appeal “which will be meritless, frivolous, and sanctionable.”ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes James Harden has 3rd triple-double, Rockets beat Blazers EDITORS’ PICK We are young Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise View commentslast_img read more

No panic button: Bolts will just work harder to get over hump

first_imgChristian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award PLAY LIST 01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Though Black is willing to take the long road in honing his young crew, the journey has hit a rough patch as the Bolts suffered their fourth defeat, this time a 97-89 loss to GlobalPort on Friday.READ: Romeo ends GlobalPort’s two-game slideFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are youngMeralo fell behind by 16 points in the first half and the deficit proved to be too much to come back from, though the veteran mentor lauded his squad for the better showing it had in the second half.“It’s kind of hard to come back from a deficit like last game, but at the same time, I thought we played much better in the second half,” he said. Rookie Jonathan Grey caught fire in the third frame, unloading 10 of his 18 points to get Meralco back in the game, but that fightback fell short and the team remained at the bottom four of the standings with a 2-5 card.READ: Wright gets hot as Phoenix stuns MeralcoThough Meralco’s rookies have been churning out stellar performances since the start of the season, their lack of a go-to-guy in the clutch was underscored against Globalport, which had Terrence Romeo among others.“My rookie showed a lot of promise in helping us get back in the basketball game. But once again, they had the player who made the big plays down the stretch in Terrence Romeo and we didn’t make the big shots when we had the chance.”Frustrating as the Bolts’ situation may be, Black said that the team couldn’t do anything but to stay the course and continue working hard until they turn things around.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Senators to proceed with review of VFA MOST READ Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View commentscenter_img PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Meralco Bolts. PBA IMAGESDespite a troubling losing skid, trades are still far from the mind of Meralco coach Norman Black at this stage of the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup.“Not now. It’s too late in the season, plus the players I have, I have young guys that we’ll continue to develop,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town We are young “There’s no panic button to push, you just keep working hard until you start winning. That’s basically it,” he said. “We’re just going to keep on working hard.There’s not pretty much I can explain to you about losing, but we’ll work hard until things turn around and we start winning. You don’t hit panic buttons, you don’t get upset and cry in the corner, you just continue to go to practice and work on your game, and try to improve as you can until you start winning games.”Meralco eyes to end its four-game losing skid against Mahindra next Wednesday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Fernandez, San Beda ‘to start from scratch’ in title retention bid Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

Women in small-island states exposed to high levels of mercury: study

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Air Pollution, Coal, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fish, Gold Mining, Health, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Crisis, Mercury, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Pollution, Public Health, Renewable Energy, Saltwater Fish, Water Pollution center_img Tests of hair samples from hundreds of women in small-island countries and territories found 75 percent had mercury levels high enough to cause fetal neurological damage.Nearly 60 percent of the women had mercury levels exceeding a threshold beyond which brain damage, IQ loss, and kidney and cardiovascular damage can occur.The report attributed the mercury pollution in fisheries in these regions to air emissions of the toxic heavy metal emanating from coal-fired power plants and artisanal gold mining.The researchers have called for a complete ban on the trade in and use of mercury, and urged a transition away from coal power to renewables. Women of childbearing age from small-island states and countries have been found to have toxic levels of mercury, a potent neurotoxin that can harm unborn children, a new report shows.The study took hair samples from 757 women between the ages of 18 and 44 years from across the Pacific, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean. Nearly 60 percent of them were found to have mercury levels of more than one part per million, or 1 ppm — the threshold above which brain damage, IQ loss, and kidney and cardiovascular damage can occur, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).The mercury level associated with the onset of fetal neurological damage is lower, at 0.58 ppm, and the number of women whose hair samples exceeded that level for mercury was 75 percent, the study found.The researchers used hair samples from women ages 18 to 44 to analyze the mercury levels in their bodies. Image courtesy of IPEN.The study, published Nov. 19, was carried out by scientists from the nonprofit Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) and IPEN, a global coalition of health and environmental groups.They took hair samples from women in 21 countries and territories — including Fiji, Barbados, Comoros, Sri Lanka, and the U.S. islands of Molokai in Hawaii and Saint Lawrence in Alaska — where industrialization remains low and the population relies on local fisheries as a major source of dietary protein.“The highest level found in the sampling that can be confirmed was over 20 ppm,” Lee Bell, IPEN’s mercury policy adviser and lead author of the report, told Mongabay in an email.The report attributed mercury pollution in these areas to distant air emissions of the toxic heavy metal from sources such as coal-fired power plants and other industries, as well as air emissions from mercury use in small-scale gold mining, eventually contaminating the ocean fish. Waste incinerators and cement kilns are also big sources of mercury pollution, Bell said.“This study presents stark evidence that mercury pollution poses an immediate threat to a significant portion of the world’s population,” Pam Miller, IPEN co-chair, said in a press statement that noted that more than 66 million people live on small islands.“They are facing a double-edged crisis from coal-based energy,” Miller said. “Their homes are threatened with flooding as climate change causes sea levels to rise, while their food supply is increasingly contaminated with mercury from coal burning emissions.”Mercy Ritte, the coordinator of the Molokai hair sampling, described the findings as “devastating,” particularly after learning that her community’s traditional island diet posed the risk of infant brain damage and reduced childhood development.“I was pregnant during the study, as were a number of other women in my community,” Ritte said as quoted in the statement. “It is unfair that we are suffering here on our tiny little island because governments far away are not ending toxic coal energy, when we all could be using renewable resources.”On top of health and environment impacts from mercury pollution, the report also estimated a total of $77.4 million in lost economic productivity assuming a 1 ppm reference level, and $130 million if no reference was used.The researchers called for a complete ban on the trade and use of mercury, and for phasing out coal-fired power for renewable energy across the world to resolve the global mercury pollution.“As long as there is a mercury trade, it will get into the hands of small scale gold miners and be released into the environment either legally or illegally,” Bell told Mongabay. “There are many substitutes for all mercury uses and no need to use it any longer in any industrial process or product. It is no longer a necessary commodity.”Mercury is commonly used in artisanal and small-scale gold mining. Much of the toxic heavy metal, burned off after being used to bind gold, ends up contaminating the ocean fish eaten by coastal communities. Image courtesy of IPEN.A global framework agreement on the issue, the Minamata Convention on Mercury, came into force in August 2017. Countries that ratified the convention are expected to apply best environmental practices to cut back on the use of mercury. But the convention has been criticized by environmental activists, who say its restrictions apply only to new coal-fired power plants and can only be legally enforced five years after the treaty enters into effect for each ratifying party.Green groups have also taken issue with the convention’s lack of provisions to limit the number of new coal-fired facilities that countries can build, and questioned the effectiveness of the convention’s concept of “best environmental practices” for these facilities.There are approximately 3,700 coal-fired power plants worldwide, with another 1,600 being built or planned. These additional plants would boost global coal-fired power output by 43 percent.IPEN and BRI published a report last year showing that 86 percent of the 1,000 women of childbearing age they surveyed in 25 countries around the world had mercury levels above the 1 ppm safety limit, with most over three times that.“We are not optimistic under current arrangements. At the moment things are getting worse,” Bell said.He cited a recent report from United Nations Environment Programme that showed mercury pollution in the atmosphere had surged by 20 percent in the five years between 2010 and 2015 due to an increase in artisanal and small-scale gold mining and the operations of more than 3,000 coal-fired power stations.“If the Minamata Convention and instruments such as the Paris Agreement can’t deliver immediate action to end the global trade in mercury and replace coal-fired power with renewable energy, then politicians should seize the moment and issue unilateral bans on mercury imports and exports and declare an end to coal fired power,” Bell said.“No amount of gold or coal is worth the poisoning of the ocean and the damage it will cause to women and their children,” he said.Banner image of mercury used in artisanal gold mining by Manuel Sadarriaga.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

New film details wrenching impact of illegal rhino horn trade on families

first_imgA new short film, titled Sides of a Horn, looks at the impacts of the illegal trade of rhino horn on a community in South Africa.The 17-minute film follows two brothers-in-law, one who is a wildlife ranger and another who contemplates poaching as a way to pay for his ailing wife’s medical care.A trip to South Africa in 2016 inspired British filmmaker Toby Wosskow to write and direct the short feature, which was publicly released June 25. Communities around the world often pay a hidden toll in the global wildlife trade. Across its 17 minutes, Sides of a Horn, a new film released June 25, aims to capture that part of the illegal trade.The story takes place in South Africa. No country, we are reminded, has a larger rhino population — or a greater gap between the wealthy and poor. When a rhino approaches the national park boundary near an impoverished township, the stark choice it presents threatens to tear a family apart.Dumi, played by South African actor Welile Nzuza, is a wildlife ranger in the park, and he’s waiting for his salary to pay for medical treatment that his ailing sister, Lindiwe, played by Dimpho Motloung, desperately needs. But her husband, Sello, played by Sherldon Marema, is sure that a week will be too long, and he wants to go after the rhino. Its horn could fetch $3,000, setting up a confrontation between the two men.“I know the lives of my people are more valuable than the lives of wild animals,” Sello tells Dumi in Zulu, the language spoken throughout much of the film.But Dumi reminds Sello that the loss of another rhino means more resources flowing out of their country. On the international market, the filmmakers point out, the horn might be worth $300,000.Sello must decide whether to pursue the rhino that has approached the national park boundary near the township where he lives with his family. Image © Whirlow Park Pictures.“They are stealing from our land to make the criminals a world away richer,” Dumi says.A 2016 trip to South Africa inspired British filmmaker Toby Wosskow to understand the decisions local community members must make, often between crippling poverty and hunting valuable endangered species like South Africa’s rhinos, with life-or-death consequences.“A nonsensical demand for rhino horn in parts of Asia is fueling a poaching war across Africa,” Wosskow said in a statement. “International crime syndicates are preying on desperate people living near protected areas, and offering them a fraction of the overseas profits to poach from their own wildlife. Meanwhile, proud anti-poaching rangers are putting their lives on the line to protect the animals.”The protagonist in the film, Dumi, is a wildlife ranger in the national park. Image © Whirlow Park Pictures.In 2018, poachers killed 769 rhinos in South Africa, according to Stop Rhino Poaching, a nonprofit group. Those statistics don’t measure the damage to communities, however. Wosskow and the film’s backers, including Virgin Group founder Richard Branson, see addressing the issues that these communities face as critical to staving off the extinction of Africa’s rhinos in the next decade.“The most common mentality in fighting this crisis is ‘buy more guns, kill more poachers,’” Wosskow said. “By humanizing the men and women on the ground, and showing the complexities of their situation, I hope our film makes people consider more sustainable solutions.”The short film, written and directed by Toby Wosskow, from executive producer Richard Branson, was an international co-production between U.S. companies Broad River Productions, Whirlow Park Pictures and Frame 48, alongside South Africa’s The Televisionaries and YKMD Productions. Image and caption © Whirlow Park Pictures.Banner image from the film of a rhino in South Africa © Whirlow Park Pictures. John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Black Rhino, China wildlife trade, China’s Demand For Resources, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Film, Insects, Mammals, Natural Capital, Parks, Poaching, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Traditional Chinese Medicine, White Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

An ill-deserved reputation threatens Sri Lanka’s ‘secretive snake’

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Reptiles, Snakes Banner image of a Sri Lankan keelback, an endemic snake primarily inhabiting the island’s southwest, courtesy of Suranjan Karunarathna.   Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by dilrukshicenter_img Citation:Gabadage, D., Surasinghe, T., De Silva, A., Somaweera, R., Madurapperuma, B., Madawala, M., & Karunarathna, S. (2018). Ecological and zoological study of endemic Sri Lankan keelback (Balanophis ceylonensis): with implications for its conservation. Vertebrate Zoology, 68(3), 225-236. A widely held misperception of the threat it poses and changes to its habitat are threatening the existence of the Sri Lankan keelback, a mildly venomous snake that inhabits the island’s southwest, new research says.The expansion of agriculture and infrastructure development in rural areas is contributing to the loss and fragmentation of the species’ habitat.Researchers have called for further study into the keelback to achieve a better conservation assessment of the species, which in turn can inform national policies to ensure its survival. A general fear of snakes, lack of understanding of reptile behavior, and human encroachment into wilderness areas are putting increasing pressure on a unique snake species found only in Sri Lanka, a new study shows.In a paper published in Vertebrate Zoology after 11 years of field study of the Sri Lankan keelback (Balanophis Ceylonensis), also known as the blossom krait, researchers say the public’s fear and misunderstanding have led to people attacking and killing non-venomous and mildly venomous snakes.The keelback, like many rear-fanged snakes, is only mildly venomous, but is often perceived as being highly venomous. It’s a fear that’s widely held with regard to snakes in general in Sri Lanka, which for the most part are semi to mildly venomous.Contributing to this fear is Sri Lanka’s high snake-bite mortality rate, exacerbated by lack of access to adequate health care, particularly in rural areas where people are more likely to encounter snakes.Keelbacks in particular prefer forest areas with dense, mature canopy and microhabitats that provide shelter, such as decaying moist leaf litter and coarse, woody debris.But with the expansion of agriculture and infrastructure development in Sri Lanka’s rural southwest, there is increased habitat loss and forest fragmentation. Urbanization and increasing human settlements also contribute to habitat loss.According to Suranjan Karunarathna, a herpetologist and corresponding author of the new paper, this trend threatens the survival of the species, as its habitat undergoes rapid changes. “This also results in more road kills,” he said of the snakes flushed out of the forests as a result of fragmentation and habitat loss.“The current populations of these snakes are severely fragmented,” the paper says. “Deforestation and degradation of small forest patches where they live are now causing a decline in both the area of occupancy and the extent of occurrence.”Beraliya in southern Sri Lanka is an ideal forest habitat for this rare endemic snake, full of leaf litter and a perfect canopy. Image courtesy of Suranjan Karunarathna.Considered endangered in Sri Lanka and near threatened in the IUCN Red List, the keelback today occurs in a range spanning just over 1,600 square kilometers (620 square miles), known as its area of occupancy.“The core area of the lowland wet zone is the best habitat for them, where the probability of occurrence is high,” Karunarathna said. “Then, the wet zone periphery and the central massif support them.”Previous research identified the species as being restricted to 23 locations, but the new paper recorded 15 more.During their survey of 83 sites, the researchers recorded keelbacks in 25 locations, 10 of them previously known localities and 15 new sites. “We could not document the snake in 11 sites where the snake was previously recorded,” Karunarathna said.Unique traitsThe keelback has some unique traits: First, it’s a sluggish creature that’s mostly active during dusk. Second, it’s evolved a genetic resistance that enables it to ingest toxic prey. And perhaps most interestingly, it has the ability to play dead for well over 20 minutes, as a survival tactic.“With a bias towards small vertebrate prey, keelback is an active forager and not a sit-and-wait predator,” said study co-author and prominent herpetologist Anslem de Silva. “Its prey selections are also influenced both by genetics and the season of the year.”Researchers say the keelback’s secretive nature and its limited surface activity may contribute to the snake being considered somewhat of a rarity. This, in turn, confounds efforts to reach a scientific consensus on the species’ conservation status.“There is a conservation disparity about this rare endemic snake with a restricted distribution within Sri Lanka. Nationally, it is considered endangered whereas the global assessment is near threatened,” the researchers said. This disparity, they said, throws into question “the actual conservation status and the actual rarity.”“Disagreements between conservation assessments may also impede national conservation actions as well as policy decisions.” they said, calling for further studies into the keelback.“There is a need for a consolidated scientific information base and informed conservation planning of this unique secretive snake,” Karunarathna said.last_img read more

‘Let us trade’: Debate over ivory sales rages ahead of CITES summit

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe want to sell off their ivory stocks to raise money for conservation.Growing human and elephant populations in these southern African countries have provoked increased human-wildlife conflict, and the governments see legal ivory sales as a way to generate revenue for conservation and development funding.Other countries, most notably Kenya, oppose the proposal, on the grounds that previous legal sales stimulated demand for ivory and coincided with a sharp increase in poaching. VICTORIA FALLS, Zimbabwe — A decade ago, what was supposed to be a one-off sale of 102 tonnes of ivory from southern African states raised $15 million for conservation and community development. But that sale coincided with a massive increase in levels of poaching across Africa. Now, Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe — which host 60 percent of Africa’s remaining elephants between them — have tabled a proposal for a further sale of ivory stocks and a resumption in the trade of elephant hunting trophies.Speaking to media on June 27 at the Wildlife Economy Summit held in Victoria Falls, President Emerson Mnangagwa of Zimbabwe laid out the basic argument: he said the sale of ivory would raise $600 million, Zimbabwe’s share of which would go toward strengthening management of the country’s 11 national parks and conservancies.Zimbabwe is battling a severe economic crisis, and Mnangagwa told journalists the money would mean improved surveillance for the country’s protected areas.“What is wrong if we use that ivory or those horns to collect revenue and improve the maintenance of national parks [and the] lives of the communities around them?” Mnangagwa said.But another group of countries, prominently including Kenya, has submitted a counter-proposal to tighten restrictions on trade in elephant parts.“Kenya has chosen not to benefit from its own natural resources given by God,” Mnangagwa said, “but we are saying we would want to benefit. Whether you like it or not an elephant someday will die and [its] tusks will fall off and when you see them, you burn them. We are saying let us trade.”April 2016: Tusks ready for destruction in Kenya. Photo: Roz Reeve Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Environment, Environmental Crime, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by terna gyuse Rewarding conservation success or reawakening demand?African elephants were placed on Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in 1990, meaning commercial trade in wild-caught specimens is illegal. Despite clear evidence of the threat posed to the species by poaching, this classification was hotly contested. Having later satisfied CITES authorities that their elephant populations were sufficiently healthy, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe’s pachyderms were downlisted to Appendix II in 1997, which permits carefully regulated trade. The same was done for South Africa in 2000, and Zambia is also currently seeking to downlist its elephants.The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is listed as vulnerable to extinction on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is estimated there were 1.2 million elephants in Africa in 1980. In less than 40 years, that number had fallen to around 415,000, according to the IUCN’s “2016 African Elephant Status Report,” with more than 70 percent of those found in southern Africa.According to government records, Zimbabwe’s elephant population has grown steadily, from 46,000 in 1980, to more than 58,000 in 1989. Today, the country has an estimated 85,000 elephants — 30,000 more than its carrying capacity, says the government.Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Zambia defend their argument to be allowed to trade ivory on the basis that legal sales will eliminate illegal markets and that the money raised will fund wildlife protection. Max Graham, CEO of Space for Giants, an international conservation organization based in Kenya, says other governments disagree.“Something close to 20 other African nations, led by Kenya, believe a legal trade helps drive demand for ivory to the point where it overwhelms frameworks and institutions put in place to manage that legal trade,” Graham told Mongabay. “That fuels a destructive illegal trade that is controlled by dangerous criminal syndicates, corrupts national institutions, puts wildlife rangers and conservationists in the line of fire, and will ultimately lead to the extinction of elephants in the wild.”Graham added that discussions about the ivory trade, or the broader utilization of wildlife, are, at their core, discussions about funding, or the lack of it.Researchers from the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research have argued that the 2008 legalization of ivory sales was linked to an increase in black market trafficking in ivory. In a 2016 paper, Solomon Hsiang and Nitin Sekar track a steep 66 percent increase in illegal ivory production following the announcement of the legal sale.“An estimated ~71% increase in ivory smuggling out of Africa corroborates this finding, while corresponding patterns are absent from natural elephant mortality, Chinese purchases of other precious materials, poaching of other species, and alternative explanatory variables,” they wrote. “These data suggest the widely documented recent increase in elephant poaching likely originated with the legal sale.”A recent survey by Elephants without Borders, a nonprofit based in South Africa, found that elephant poaching was on the rise in Botswana, which in May this year lifted a five-year self-imposed ban on elephant hunting. The survey indicated that 156 elephants were poached in the country in 2018.The Monitoring the Illegal Killing of Elephants (MIKE) project, an initiative by CITES that tracks poaching levels, shows that there was an increase in levels of illegal killing of elephants starting in 2006. The killings peaked in 2011 and declined thereafter. MIKE recorded more than 17,780 carcasses between 2003 and 2017 at monitoring sites across the continent.Patricia Awori, of the Pan African Conservation Network, said she’s doubtful that selling ivory will solve questions of funding for conservation. “We are not keen on reopening the ivory trade, even if it is one-off sales, because it reopens markets that are closed and awakens a voracious appetite for ivory that cannot be quenched by existing ivory. Demand for ivory results in the needless slaughter of elephants around the continent.”African elephants in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Photo: Rhett A. Butler.Broader perspective neededIn an interview at the wildlife summit, Ivonne Higuero, secretary-general of CITES, told Mongabay that the various proposals will be put on the table for discussion at the next conference of parties to the convention, scheduled for Geneva in August.“This is sort of a tense moment on the continent in that there is a difference between what the requests are from the various African countries that have populations of African elephants,” she told Mongabay.Higuero acknowledged that countries with African elephant populations are bearing enormous conservation costs that they need to offset, and that the ivory trade is one of the alternatives open to them.“Conservation is absolutely important for the present and future generations. We depend on nature, wild species of flora and fauna and ecosystem services for our food, health, water, livelihoods and economies,” she said. “However, the benefits accrue for the entire world while the costs are borne by the custodians. We need more recognition of these costs of conservation and the alternative costs associated with not using resources to ensure sustainability and replenishment of stocks (with fisheries for example).”The CITES chief said that while there’s a focus on the question of hunting elephants and trading ivory, there’s a legal international trade in many other animal and plant species that are very profitable for the southern Africa region and Africa more widely.“We need a much broader and wiser vision of what a wildlife economy means,” she said, “and that should not only focus on animals, but it is plants and animals and that there are many areas of legal trade that we should pay attention to, and develop those that could bring in much more money and improve economies in many African countries.”Higuero called for clear systems of payment for natural environment benefits that could support conservation efforts in habitat countries.“In this way, also, the custodians put value on those resources and will have incentives to take care of the resources and use them sustainably,” she said.As the CITES summit approaches, Zimbabwe and others are talking tough.“Up to now we have not agreed with CITES and we are keeping our ivory,” Mnangagwa told the press. “We will only dispose of our stock when we have agreed. If we do not agree, we will keep our stocks. We will not burn our stocks.”Banner image: Desert elephants in Namibia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Related articlesNew research measures impacts of China’s elephant ivory trade ban(October 2018) Research released by WWF and TRAFFIC, the wildlife monitoring network, found that there has been a substantial decline in the number of Chinese consumers buying ivory since the ivory trade ban went into effect on December 31, 2017. But there is still work to be done to diminish both the supply and demand for elephant ivory in China.CITES proposals by African countries aim to end the ivory trade(June 2016) Five proposals were submitted to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in late April by African Elephant Coalition countries in response to the poaching crisis facing African elephants over the last decade. The proposals are designed to end the ivory trade once and for all. As many as 100,000 elephants are believed to have been killed for their ivory between 2010 and 2012, during the height of the crisis, many in AEC countries.Countries at IUCN Congress vote to ban domestic ivory markets(September 2016) At the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress in Hawaii last week, delegates passed a motion to ban all domestic ivory markets. The ban is not legally binding, but urges governments with legal domestic markets for elephant ivory to close them down. Countries like Namibia, Japan and South Africa opposed the motion arguing that domestic markets should be regulated but kept open.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Can jurisdictional certification curb palm oil deforestation in Indonesia? (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Certification, Commentary, Commodity Roundtables, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Jurisdictional Approaches, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Researcher Perspectives Series, Saving Rainforests Collaborative Learning and Innovation at the District LevelThe challenges faced by the people of Seruyan and their natural environment cannot be solved alone by current supply chain certification approaches, including RSPO and ISPO certification. Here we highlight four challenges that prevent the sustainable and inclusive production of palm oil, including meeting RSPO certification requirements.Challenge 1: Some of the international methodologies for RSPO certification, such as “High Conservation Value Area” and “High Carbon Stock” assessments are not recognized by public agencies, that have their own approaches to conservation assessment. Hence, without integrating these concepts into the government approach, it will not lead to effective implementation by the government.INOBU and EII are currently supporting the district government to develop a district spatial and environmental management plan. The process involves the first district carrying capacity assessment, which is being supported by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and involves spatial modelling and ecological field surveys to establish hard restrictions on the conversion of native vegetation to other uses, and guidance for maintaining water supply and controlling fire and other risks. Revisions to the draft spatial plan have been proposed that include increased forest and peatland protection, areas for rehabilitation and a proposed wildlife corridor along the riparian areas, that will connect the main forest areas in the north and south of the district. The carrying capacity assessment is defined under Law No. 32/2009 on Environmental Protection and Management and is under the authority of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. This will also result in the jurisdiction-wide environmental protection plan, formalized by a district regulation or peraturan daerah, that will guide the implementation of environmental protection in the entire district. Seruyan will be the first district that has such documents.Challenge 2: The Government of Indonesia does not have a system for registering or monitoring smallholder farmers, making it difficult to develop programs for providing them with technical assistance or credit and undermining the traceability of supply chains. Through the work in the pilot districts, a plantation monitoring system known as SIPKEBUN, was developed by INOBU in conjunction with the Ministry of Agriculture and provincial and district governments. The system involves an innovative, integrated Android application for mapping plots and registering oil palm smallholders. The application has also been used for mapping and registering nutmeg producers in West Papua, and is planned to be expanded to other provinces and commodities in Indonesia. The Ministry of Agriculture is in the process of agreeing on using a modified version of the system for registering and issuing cultivation certificates for small-scale commodity producers across Indonesia.Challenge 3: Farming practices and productivity limited due to lack of effective rural extension and technical support for smallholders, lack of mechanism for companies to deliver financial contributions to farmers, and lack of business know-how.The PELITA Agricultural Facility was designed and launched in 2018, under the leadership of INOBU, to provide inputs, training and eventually credit to independent smallholders in Seruyan district. The facility is initially focused on oil palm smallholders before expanding to other commodities. The facility is an independent association comprised of representatives from the district government, agribusinesses and mills, and non-government organizations, including INOBU. Each of the members makes financial or in-kind contributions to support the activities of the facility. The facility is the first of its kind in Indonesia.Challenge 4: Current approach to Free Prior and Informed Consent is on a case-by-case basis when a more systemic approach is needed to address rural conflict across the entire District.A pilot initiative for implementing FPIC at the jurisdictional (district) level to resolve land conflicts has been launched. The FPIC mechanism will include a standard operating procedure for preventing and mediating conflicts, which will be supported by a district regulation and tied to the plantation monitoring system. The design is currently being discussed with the relevant non-government organizations, including the Forest Peoples Programme (FPP). This initiative is the first of its kind that we are aware of in Indonesia.Peat fire in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Jurisdictional authorityAlthough the legal framework and delegation of authority to district governments provide opportunities, they also limit the scope of what can be achieved by these governments. The main constraint on district governments in Indonesia in the context of jurisdictional certification is that the forest estate remains under the authority of provincial governments. District governments only have authority over the people who live in forest areas and can propose changes to the forest area. Ultimately, however, management authority for these areas resides with the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, devolved to the provincial level. District governments also have limited authority for revoking existing licenses that were responsible for causing social or environmental harm in the past.And, despite the ongoing efforts of the Indonesian government and the anti-corruption commission, corruption remains a persistent problem at all levels of government. A recent case in Seruyan District, where it is alleged plantation companies bribed provincial parliamentarians, demonstrates the challenges of working with governments in Indonesia. The actions of a few have the potential to tar the efforts of the many. At best, the jurisdictional certification process aims to improve the transparency and governance of the palm oil supply chain, reducing the opportunities for rent seeking behavior.Intact rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Don’t forget the landscapes for the jargonJurisdictional certification, in the right context, offers the potential of achieving inclusive and sustainable production of oil palm at a large scale. Jurisdictional certification also offers the clearest pathway for implementing landscape approaches to sustainable production that are strengthened by laws and regulations and embedded in multi-stakeholder, collective initiatives. Its effectiveness derives from its technocratic approach, although this type of approach may have limited appeal to consumers and other actors in the palm oil supply chain. The Seruyan pilot does not yet have a strong marketing component, although the potential should grow as the innovations described here are fully implemented. A good example of this is WWF Malaysia’s Living Landscape Program in Sabah, which promotes production, protection and restoration, while still contributing to the broader jurisdictional certification program.And, although jurisdictional certification is a promising approach for catalyzing innovative approaches for sustainable and inclusive production, there are many challenges. A global drop in palm oil prices, which has led to reduced demand for smallholder fresh fruit bunches, means that jurisdictional certification for palm oil, by itself, is not sufficient. Single commodity certification should be seen as the first step in a pathway towards a diversified, sustainable production landscape, which is resilient to market fluctuations.The new, stricter RSPO Principles and Criteria, especially related to no deforestation, also present challenges in their application at the jurisdictional level. Despite the general consensus that there is a need to reduce deforestation, some land clearing is necessary for agricultural production and infrastructure development. Zero net deforestation has been proposed as an alternative compromise, although how that will align with the new Principles and Criteria, and their application at the jurisdictional level, still needs to be discussed.On the flip side, there is a surprising lack of evidence that corporate zero deforestation pledges or RSPO certification as traditionally applied are having significant effects on regional deforestation trends in Indonesia. They are certainly not yet leading to regional, systemic approaches, embedded in public policies and regulations, to the issues of deforestation, land conflict and smallholder inclusion. The hope is that the jurisdictional approach can act as a bridge towards national level reforms.Finally, although the benefits of jurisdictional certification derive from the collective action from producers, governments and civil society, it also presents challenges. Two major challenges to jurisdictional certification are: finding appropriate mechanisms for sanctioning for non-compliant producers and equitably distributing the benefits of certification, including price premiums. These issues would need to be managed by a jurisdictional certification management entity, which would also be required to manage audits, and conversely, be capable of being audited.Despite these challenges, jurisdictional certification presents an opportunity and a model for protecting and restoring tropical landscapes while improving the welfare of farmers and protecting human rights. It takes sustainability standards to the right scale where issues such as wildlife corridors and riparian forests as well as systemic legal protections for human rights are possible. It also provides the incentives and mechanisms for collective action at the landscape scale, including partnerships with buyer and consumer goods companies as well as donors. Models such as these are needed if we are to reduce tropical deforestation and environmental degradation in the near future.John Watts is Director of Strategic Initiatives at Inovasi Bumi. Dan Nepstad is Executive Director & President at Earth Innovation Institute. Silvia Irawan is Executive Director at Inovasi Bumi. Acknowledgements: The work described in this Commentary was funded by grants from the Norwegian Development Agency (NORAD) and the German International Climate Initiative (IKI) to the Earth Innovation Institute, and grants from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation and the United National Environment Programme to INOBU.Disclosure: the authors are involved with efforts to implement a jurisdictional approach in Seruyan Regency.Citations:Hansen, M. C. et al. High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change. Science 342, 850–853 (2013).Gaveau, D. L. A. et al. Rise and fall of forest loss and industrial plantations in Borneo (2000–2017). Conserv. Lett. 0, e12622 (2018). In this commentary, Dan Nepstad of Earth Innovation Institute and John Watts and Silvia Irawan of Inovasi Bumi argue that the surge in oil palm expansion in Indonesia since the early 2000s has caused deforestation, environmental degradation and social conflicts; strategies to reduce these negative impacts have seen only modest success.The authors say the jurisdictional certification pilots of the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) represent a promising new approach to these issues. The RSPO pilot in Seruyan — a district that has experienced many of these problems — has led to several innovations, including an agricultural facility that provides technical support to smallholders while managing funds received from companies, implementation of the “jurisdiction-wide environmental protection plan” regulation, a mechanism for resolving land conflicts, and a method for mapping and registering independent smallholders.Deforestation may be on the decline in Seruyan, with the exception of the El Niño related fires of 2015 and 2016. Through jurisdictional certification, there is the potential to protect 480 thousand hectares of standing forests and restore 420 thousand hectares of forests.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. The fall of the Suharto regime and the beginning of the democratic or reformasi era in Indonesia coincided with a massive surge in deforestation. One of the central reasons for this surge was the decentralization of authority for land and forest management to the district level in the early 2000s. Local governments were both ill-prepared and unequipped to deal with this sudden delegation of responsibility. Plantation companies, eager to expand their holdings, were able to benefit from this new political environment, which consequently led to the massive expansion of plantation areas. The environmental and social consequences of this mostly unmanaged and unplanned expansion were extensive, and the effects of this era continue until today.The rapid expansion of oil palm plantations during this era cemented the negative impression of oil palm in the minds of activists, non-government organizations and consumers around the world. Oil palm, in itself, is neither good nor bad. As one of the most efficient oil crops in the world, its derivatives are used in a seemingly endless array of products, from cooking oils to cosmetics and confectionary, to biofuel. Consequently, it is the best placed crop to meet the increasing global demand for consumer goods while minimizing the expansion into forest areas. Despite these advantages, it remains one of the most maligned crops in existence today.Although the negative social and environmental effects of oil palm expansion reflect a failure of decentralized governance, local governments have not yet been a major part of the efforts to solve the problem. Governments were notably absent from the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, formed in 2004 to promote the sustainable production and use of palm oil, and its certification systems. Since 2010, zero deforestation pledges from producer and buyer companies became a trend, including business groups such as the Consumer Goods Forum, followed by governments in developed countries, through commitments such as the Amsterdam Declaration in 2015. Many companies set a date of 2020 as the target for zero deforestation supply chains. With just a few months until 2020, most of these pledges are unlikely to be met. There are many reasons that these commitments have been challenging to implement, including: splitting the market, deepening rural food insecurity and poverty, penalizing farmers and farm businesses who are striving to comply with the law, antagonizing governments and farmers in target regions, and creating too many new requirements for producers and processors, to name a few.As the Indonesian government became more sensitive to the effects of environmental campaigns on the production and sale of their palm oil, they issued several policies for reducing deforestation, including issuing a moratorium on plantation expansion and the Indonesian Sustainable Palm Oil certification system (ISPO). These initiatives, however, did not extend down to local governments.Recently, the potential role of local governments as key actors in solving deforestation has been highlighted. Here we present one pathway for engaging local governments through the example of a pilot of RSPO jurisdictional certification in Central Kalimantan. We demonstrate how jurisdictional certification has been used as a collaborative pathway for overcoming the obstacles to sustainability and catalyzing regulatory and institutional innovations.Orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park. Parts of the park in Seruyan were allocated for oil palm plantations. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Jurisdictional CertificationThe jurisdictional approach to the certification of palm oil in practice refers to the application of the RSPO Principles and Criteria at the level of the jurisdiction. Ideally, it should simplify and reduce the costs of certification thus expanding RSPO coverage while improving social and environmental outcomes. All actors in the palm oil supply chain, from independent smallholders, medium to industrial scale plantations, mills, traders and transporters should be covered. The central challenge of the approach is how to simplify, expand and reduce the costs of implementing the Principles and Criteria without diluting them.Jurisdictional certification is still in the pilot phase, with three ongoing pilots in Ecuador, the State of Sabah, Malaysia, and the district of Seruyan in the Province of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The first of these pilots, Sabah, was first announced in 2015, followed shortly by Seruyan and Ecuador, meaning that the processes are still in their infancy. The diversity of jurisdictional scales reveals one of the most important constraining–and enabling–aspects of jurisdictional certification: the level of government responsible for jurisdictional certification relates to its level of devolved or decentralized authority. Whereas in Malaysia, which is a federation, states have the relevant authority, in the case of Indonesia, a unitary republic, districts have the most relevant decentralized authority. As the role of sub-national governments are central to the implementation of jurisdictional certification, the Principles and Criteria should be implemented in the context of the prevailing laws and regulations, where possible. This translation between voluntary principles and criteria and legal frameworks will never be precise.Most importantly, jurisdictional certification is also a collaborative effort by local governments, producers and civil society organizations, supported by donors and buyers, to meet sustainable and inclusive palm oil standards. It is a collective effort, driven by democratic governments, to improve the sustainability of production for the benefit for both producers and the citizens of the jurisdiction. It requires the support by various different stakeholders including the private sector and this has started to be seen by the direct involvement by companies willing to pilot the concept. Unilever has been supporting various jurisdictional sustainability approaches including with Yayasan Penelitian Inovasi Bumi (INOBU) in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia and with the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Sabah, Malaysia in effort to go beyond the typical supply chain certification schemes and work at a jurisdictional level to drive sustainable production and protection of a landscape. This approach differs from the prevailing approaches that seek to apply externally determined criteria to tropical jurisdictions. The costs of certification are also shared among the different parties so that the financial burden is not on tropical governments and their constituents alone.We discuss how this collaborative approach has been implemented in practice through the example of Seruyan District.Newly established oil palm plantation in Central Kalimantan. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.Seruyan, A Palm Oil DistrictSince the beginning of decentralization in Indonesia, Seruyan District has, in many regards, represented the worst aspects of the palm oil boom in Indonesia. Consequently, it also provides a good model of how to stop and even reverse the socially and environmentally detrimental aspects of oil palm expansion.Located in the province of Central Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo, the district has experienced extensive land use change in its southern and central regions since the 1990s. Initially driven by forestry concessions, the decentralization of authority to district governments in the 2000s led to an allocation of oil palm plantations in the central part of Seruyan district. The allocation of oil palm concessions led to further deforestation and dispossession of local and indigenous farmers. The backlash to this plantation development led to the election of a district head, who, in part, campaigned on a platform calling for socially inclusive oil palm development. In 2015, the former head of Seruyan district, Sudarsono, declared his commitment for the district to become one of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil’s pilot jurisdictions for jurisdictional certification. Since then, the district has begun a comprehensive program of activities for promoting sustainable and inclusive oil palm production and has not approved any new oil palm concessions but instead has focused on supporting smallholders. With the exception of fire-related forest loss during the severely dry El Niño years, deforestation and forest degradation has largely stabilized in the district (Figure 1), with forestry operations in the northern part of the district responsible for most of the ongoing forest degradation. Although there are extensive forest areas in the north of the district, as well as forests in the south, especially in the protected areas, there is no connectivity between these forests, largely caused by the establishment of oil palm plantations in the central part of the district (Figure 2).Figure 1: Deforestation in Seruyan district from 2001 to 2017. The chart shows the rates of deforestation in Seruyan district based on data from the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry as well as from Hansen and others. The spike in deforestation in the period of 2015 to 2016 was caused by fires that were exacerbated by the El Niño event during that period.Figure 2: Land cover change in Seruyan District from 1990 to 2016 based on data from the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry.last_img read more

A response to “On public interest in conservation and internet data”

first_imgCommentary, Conservation Technology, data, Editorials Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img This post is a response to “On public interest in conservation and internet data (commentary)”, which was published on Mongabay on July 15, 2019.This text was published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. In their letter, Correia and colleagues raise two issues about our original article (Burivalova et al. 2018). Their first point questions the proposition that a growth in absolute search volume reflects an increase in public interest. We fully agree that this is unlikely to be a straightforward relationship: it would be affected by disparities in internet access, different reasons for searching the internet, and so forth. See the full response in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.last_img read more

On public interest in conservation and internet data (commentary)

first_imgConservationists can capture data and use it to generate useful insights for conservation on the relationship between humans and nature. Research in this area falls within the scope of the field of conservation culturomics, the study of human culture through the quantitative analysis of digital data.Several studies have used internet search-engine data to evaluate public interest in conservation. These studies were subjected to a few criticisms, however, including the fact that raw data are unavailable due to proprietary constraints. In response to these criticisms, a recent study proposed a methodological work-around — an important contribution that merits praise but should be interpreted with caution.Does this mean we should forfeit any hopes that internet data and digital methods can provide useful insights for conservation? Certainly not! The application of digital methods to conservation has immense potential, but also faces challenges inherent to any new development.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Conservationists are increasingly looking toward technology for aid. We are now better able to monitor forest change as result of deforestation or climate change, survey inaccessible areas for rare species using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones) or track endangered animals in their journeys across the globe with tracking devices, and use the knowledge obtained through these technologies to improve conservation action.But the contribution of technology to conservation doesn’t end there: it is also helping conservationists to better understand human-nature interactions. As access to information and communication technologies (e.g. the Internet, smartphones, social media, etc.) increases across the world, so do records of the interactions between humans and nature in the digital realm.Conservationists can capture these data and use it to generate useful insights for conservation on the relationship between humans and nature, including estimating protected area visitation, exploring how different groups of people engage in recreational activities such as hunting and fishing, and monitoring the trade of endangered species on the internet. Research in this area falls within the scope of the field of conservation culturomics, the study of human culture through the quantitative analysis of digital data, recently highlighted as one of the key emerging topics in conservation.Several studies have used internet search-engine data to evaluate public interest in conservation. The number of internet searches for conservation and biodiversity-related topics can be regarded as a proxy of interest in these topics, and by collecting such data from internet searches engines — the most prominent example being Google — it may be possible to evaluate how interest changes over time. Some of the earliest studies exploring internet search data with this aim (see here and here, for instance) reported severe declines in global interest for conservation-related topics since the early 2000s (when search engine data started becoming available). These studies were subjected to a few criticisms, however, including the fact that raw data are unavailable due to proprietary constraints. Internet search data are usually provided only in pre-analyzed format, in the form of an index representing relative search interest, and this makes it difficult to evaluate how the actual volume of searches has changed over time.In response to these criticisms, a recent study proposed a methodological work-around that accounts for how the total number of internet searches has changed over time, making it possible to infer how the absolute volume of searches for a given topic has changed over time. Applying this method to a range of conservation and climate change-related topics, the authors reached the conclusion that the number of searches for this topic has greatly increased in recent years. Not only that, the study also suggests that conservation topics generate similar levels of interest to environmental change topics, such as climate change and global warming, in contrast to what has been previously claimed.Digital technologies provide new possibilities for the study of human-nature interactions and to develop conservation applications. Photo courtesy of the the Conservation Culturomics Working Group.The authors argue that their results have important consequences for how conservation science is communicated to the public, particularly in relation to other topics of concern such as climate change, and the positive outlook provided by this study was quickly picked up and publicized by various news media, including an article in Mongabay. The methodology proposed by this study is certainly an important contribution that merits praise, but its results should be interpreted with caution.Specifically, an increase in the total number of internet searches should be expected for any topic in recent years because search engine usage has increased exponentially in this period. Access to the internet is increasing worldwide and ever more people are taking advantage of search engines to retrieve information for the web. Internet search trends may therefore be affected by factors such as the growth in internet access, search engine usage, time spent online, and the changing nature of internet usage. Furthermore, the reported similarity between public interest in biodiversity and climate change topics failed to account for differences in absolute search volume between topics and short-term variations in public interest that, when accounted for, suggest interest in these topics is less similar and more dynamic than reported. Clearly, scientists aiming to extract inferences on public interest in conservation (or any other topic) from internet data are faced with important methodological challenges because results and interpretations may differ depending on which factors are considered and accounted for.Does this mean we should forfeit any hopes that internet data and digital methods can provide useful insights for conservation? Certainly not! The application of digital methods to conservation has immense potential, but also faces challenges inherent to any new development. Conservationists need to recognize the limitations and challenges associated with digital data and methods and collaborate with colleagues, both within and outside the field, to develop innovative ways to overcome them if we are to take full advantage of the opportunities such methods provide. More studies like these are needed to advance the field — one possible way forward is to combine data from multiple digital data sources (e.g. search engines, social media, Wikipedia, etc.) to validate results across platforms, but other solutions may emerge.To help in these developments, the Society for Conservation Biology has recently approved the establishment of a Conservation Culturomics working group, which hopes to bring together scientists, practitioners and decision-makers interested in advancing the application of digital methods to conservation problems. The group aims to facilitate discussions, knowledge-sharing, and collaborative efforts through a welcoming, supportive, and stimulating environment. The group is already organizing several activities, including a symposium in the upcoming International Conference on Conservation Biology and a proposed special section in Conservation Biology dedicated to the topic. As one of the founding members of the group, I would like to encourage all interested parties to join this endeavor and work together toward advancing digital methods for conservation.Response to Correia et al from the authors of “Analyzing Google search data to debunk myths about the public’s interest in conservation”.CITATIONS• Burivalova, Z., Butler, R. A., & Wilcove, D. S. (2018). Analyzing Google search data to debunk myths about the public’s interest in conservation. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 16(9), 509-514. doi:10.1002/fee.1962• Correia, R. A., Di Minin, E., Jarić, I., Jepson, P., Ladle, R., Mittermeier, J., … & Veríssimo, D. (2019). Inferring public interest from search engine data requires caution. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 17(5), 254-255. doi:10.1002/fee.2048• Di Minin, E., Fink, C., Hiippala, T., & Tenkanen, H. (2019). A framework for investigating illegal wildlife trade on social media with machine learning. Conservation biology. doi:10.1111/cobi.13104• Ladle, R. J., Correia, R. A., Do, Y., Joo, G. J., Malhado, A. C., Proulx, R., … & Jepson, P. (2016). Conservation culturomics. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 14(5), 269-275. doi:10.1002/fee.1260• Mccallum, M. L., & Bury, G. W. (2013). Google search patterns suggest declining interest in the environment. Biodiversity and conservation, 22(6-7), 1355-1367. doi:10.1007/s10531-013-0476-6• Sbragaglia, V., Correia, R. A., Coco, S., & Arlinghaus, R. (2019). Data mining on YouTube reveals fisher group-specific harvesting patterns and social engagement in recreational anglers and spearfishers. ICES Journal of Marine Science. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsz100• Sutherland, W. J., Butchart, S. H., Connor, B., Culshaw, C., Dicks, L. V., Dinsdale, J., … & Jiang, Z. (2018). A 2018 horizon scan of emerging issues for global conservation and biological diversity. Trends in ecology & evolution, 33(1), 47-58. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2017.11.006• Tenkanen, H., Di Minin, E., Heikinheimo, V., Hausmann, A., Herbst, M., Kajala, L., & Toivonen, T. (2017). Instagram, Flickr, or Twitter: Assessing the usability of social media data for visitor monitoring in protected areas. Scientific reports, 7(1), 17615. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18007-4• Troumbis, A. Y. (2017). Declining Google Trends of public interest in biodiversity: semantics, statistics or traceability of changing priorities?. Biodiversity and Conservation, 26(6), 1495-1505. doi:10.1007/s10531-017-1294-zRicardo Correia is a researcher based at the University of Aveiro (Portugal) and the Federal University of Alagoas (Brazil). His research focuses on the use of novel technologies for conservation applications, including the study of human-nature interactions from internet data. Ricardo is also one of the members of the Conservation Culturomics working group steering committee.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Big Data, Commentary, Conservation Technology, Editorials, Environment, Internet, Researcher Perspective Series, Technology, Technology And Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more