Eagles softball team finds ways to win despite struggles at plate

first_imgMIDDLETOWN SOUTH By WAYNE WITKOWSKI Correspondent Middletown High School South’s softball team is finding ways to win games lately, but hitting has not been much of a factor in that. Although different batters have come up with goodhitting games as of late, coach Tom Erbig said there continues to be a lack of support in that regard, a problem that stems back to last season.Erbig said his team, which has a good 14-8 record despite its hitting woes, may sneak away with a state tournament win or two, but it will be hard to get much further without healthier and more reliable contact at the plate. The Eagles play the Allentown High School vs. Hopewell Valley Central High School winner in the next round of the NJSIAA Central Jersey Group III tournament after pulling out a 2-1opening round victory over Hightstown High School, as Maddie McMahon pitched a three-hitter.They also began play in the Shore Conference Tournament on May 20 in a game scheduled against Manalapan High School. The Eagles are concentrating on those two tournaments this season, as they passed up playing in the Monmouth County Tournament because Erbig said it was too hard to get the games in.“My pitching — no complaint,” said Erbig, as McMahon and Tiffani Lambert have shared those duties capably. “We just don’t perform on offense enough. We’re batting .333 as a team, which is not saying much in softball. Our hitting has been anemic. Our defense has been sometimes suspect, but lately it’s been all right. We’re like a Jekyll and Hyde team. One day we come out and play very well, and another day we’re sloppy.”The Eagles had perhaps their best day of the season on May 14 when they knocked off perennial Monmouth County power St. John Vianney High School, 3-1. Julia Beck smashed a two-run single and Julia Blarr knocked in another run. Beck has been the bright spot, hitting around .400. “They hit the ball right at us, and we made the plays we needed to make,” Erbig said. Grace Heller belted a tworun homer that decided a 2-0 victory over Raritan High School on May 13. McMahon pitched the shutout. It came a day after Middletown South flubbed in the field in a 5-4 loss to Red Bank Catholic High School. “We had that game won, but we threw the ball away and did not capitalize on opportunities late in the game after we started off good,” Erbig said. “Every at-bat by the opposing team becomes important because the games are close. I don’t understand it because we looked so good in the preseason, a different team from what we’ve had out there [lately].” There’s no room for error with the light hitting, and that includes on the mound, where Lambert got one pitch up that was hit for a deciding home run in a loss to Middletown High School North, 2-1. It was part of the Eagles’ three-game losing streak before last week’s games, when the Eagles went 4-1, including a 4-3 victory over Ocean Township High School that started the week.Erbig can only be cautiously optimistic about whether the hitting will get better for a team that has been tournament tough over the years.last_img read more

APOEL a step closer to fourth straight title

first_imgAPOEL moved a step closer to their fourth consecutive league title after beating arch-rivals Omonia while second-placed AEK, who beat Anorthosis, remained four points adrift with three games to go. In the relegation scrap, Paphos FC increased their advantage to Ethnikos Achnas to three points following their narrow 1-0 win over Aris while Ethnikos could only draw with Ermis. APOEL showed their mettle against Omonia and bounced back from their midweek Cup exit and the subsequent sacking of coach Temur Ketsbaia with a comfortable 2-0 win. Greek winger Yiannis Yianniotas was the hero for APOEL who took advantage of sloppy Omonia defending and scored both goals. The first came midway through the first half when the winger headed past Omonia keeper Panayi with his marker Margaca guilty of ball watching.A minute before the break, Omonia’s defence was caught napping again and Yianniotas duly obliged by slotting the ball past the oncoming Panayi.The 12,000 Omonia supporters that turned up for the game were bitterly disappointed not only by the score but also by the performance. It is now more than three years since Omonia last beat their fierce rivals and on this showing they may have to wait a while longer.AEK overcame suspensions and injuries to defeat Anorthosis 3-2 to keep up the pressure on the leaders.AEK were without their midfield quartet of Larena, Tomas, Bolievic and Lamban and had to dig deep to claim all three points.They were offered a helping hand by some bizarre Anorthosis defending that gifted them the first two goals and some even worse Anorthosis finishing that saw their players stumbling just before they were about to pull the trigger.AEK took the lead through a Triscovski penalty while an Avraam own goal doubled the score before the break.Laifis, who was later sent off for lunging at Triscovski, pulled one back, before Triscovski restored his team’s two-goal lead with a volley from the edge of the penalty area six minutes from the end.Ndlovu got Anorthosis’ second from the penalty spot with practically the last kick of the game.Apollon had few problems in defeating Nea Salamina 3-0. The goals came from Angeli, a da Silva penalty and Stojanovic.A 61st-minute goal by Ogoyie was enough to give Paphos FC the three points against Aris. The Paphos team were the better side and should have won more comfortably with the scorer Ogoyie, de Melo and Agivi all guilty of glaring misses.A penalty eight minutes from the end denied Ethnikos Achnas the three points away to Ermis. The visitors were the better side and took the lead through de Vrysse but were unable to put the game to bed and were made to pay when Keita converted Ermis’ late penalty.In the final game, Doxa beat AEL courtesy of an Aguinaldo goal and are now level on points with the Limassol team at the top of the relegation group.Omonia vs APOEL 0-2AEK vs Anorthosis 3-2Nea Salamina vs Apollon 0-3 Paphos FC vs Aris 1-0Ermis Aradippou vs Ethnikos 1-1AEL vs Doxa 0-1(Highlights courtesy of the Cyprus Football Association)last_img read more

No panic button: Bolts will just work harder to get over hump

first_imgChristian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award PLAY LIST 01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Though Black is willing to take the long road in honing his young crew, the journey has hit a rough patch as the Bolts suffered their fourth defeat, this time a 97-89 loss to GlobalPort on Friday.READ: Romeo ends GlobalPort’s two-game slideFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are youngMeralo fell behind by 16 points in the first half and the deficit proved to be too much to come back from, though the veteran mentor lauded his squad for the better showing it had in the second half.“It’s kind of hard to come back from a deficit like last game, but at the same time, I thought we played much better in the second half,” he said. Rookie Jonathan Grey caught fire in the third frame, unloading 10 of his 18 points to get Meralco back in the game, but that fightback fell short and the team remained at the bottom four of the standings with a 2-5 card.READ: Wright gets hot as Phoenix stuns MeralcoThough Meralco’s rookies have been churning out stellar performances since the start of the season, their lack of a go-to-guy in the clutch was underscored against Globalport, which had Terrence Romeo among others.“My rookie showed a lot of promise in helping us get back in the basketball game. But once again, they had the player who made the big plays down the stretch in Terrence Romeo and we didn’t make the big shots when we had the chance.”Frustrating as the Bolts’ situation may be, Black said that the team couldn’t do anything but to stay the course and continue working hard until they turn things around.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Senators to proceed with review of VFA MOST READ Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes View commentscenter_img PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Meralco Bolts. PBA IMAGESDespite a troubling losing skid, trades are still far from the mind of Meralco coach Norman Black at this stage of the 2017 PBA Philippine Cup.“Not now. It’s too late in the season, plus the players I have, I have young guys that we’ll continue to develop,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town We are young “There’s no panic button to push, you just keep working hard until you start winning. That’s basically it,” he said. “We’re just going to keep on working hard.There’s not pretty much I can explain to you about losing, but we’ll work hard until things turn around and we start winning. You don’t hit panic buttons, you don’t get upset and cry in the corner, you just continue to go to practice and work on your game, and try to improve as you can until you start winning games.”Meralco eyes to end its four-game losing skid against Mahindra next Wednesday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Fernandez, San Beda ‘to start from scratch’ in title retention bid Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esportslast_img read more

The challenges of campaigning against wildlife trafficking in Vietnam

first_img“Be Their Bodhisattva,” a striking anti-wildlife trafficking campaign, was organized in Vietnam from Jan. 25 to March 25 this year.The campaign caught the attention of both the public and prominent national media outlets.However, record-breaking seizures of wildlife parts destined for Vietnam in the months since demonstrate the breadth and depth of the problem. HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam — In late January, WildAid and the Ho Chi Minh City-based Center of Hands-on Actions and Networking for Growth and Environment (CHANGE) launched a graphic anti-wildlife trafficking campaign focused on three animals: pangolins, elephants and rhinos.In a bold move, the organizers brought a group of bloodied, weakened statues of these animals to Buddhist temples, the center of spiritual life for most Vietnamese, around the country. This eye-catching strategy attracted plenty of public and media attention, but how impactful was the campaign in a country that acts as both a major transit hub and end point for wildlife products?There are two ways to measure the success of a campaign like this, according to John Baker, chief program officer and managing director at WildAid.“Our general approach is we usually do [an] awareness and attitude-behavior type survey,” he told Mongabay over Skype. “We try to do it every two years so that we’re asking the same questions and measuring any changes over time.”The other method, which is how WildAid and CHANGE measured the “Be Their Bodhisattva” campaign, is to track public engagement.“We measure all the metrics of that specific activity,” Baker said. “So if we put up 1,000 billboards or we have a video, usually we can track how many times the video was played and on what media outlets. Sometimes it’s broadcast, sometimes it’s online, and then other types of measuring, like social media interactions.”Public engagementA wildlife trafficking campaign sign in Ho Chi Minh City. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.A post-campaign metrics report provided to Mongabay by CHANGE shows that it received plenty of interaction from the public.According to the report, ‘’Be Their Bodhisattva” received nearly 140,000 Facebook likes, as well as 18,675 “total collectable mentions,” which include posts and comments. Facebook is the most popular social media network in Vietnam.Overall, 91.2 percent of these mentions were created by what’s known as “earned media,” meaning posts and interactions not involving WildAid or CHANGE, the creators of the original social media posts about the campaign.Meanwhile, local news platforms mentioned the effort 95 times, the vast majority of which were positive, while eight were negative and 17 were neutral. Most of the negative mentions came from Zing, a local news outlet, which argued that temples were an inappropriate location for the campaign, especially during the Lunar New Year, Vietnam’s biggest holiday.The public reaction on social media was overwhelmingly positive as well, with 90.9 percent responding in a positive manner, compared to 7.7 percent neutral and just 1.3 percent negative.“We were pretty happy with the magnitude of this,” Baker said. “Up to 30 million Vietnamese people saw the campaign, and we didn’t pay a single dollar for placement.”That is nearly a third of the country’s population of 96 million. Unfortunately, not everyone got the message, and Vietnam has continued to make international headlines for wildlife product seizures of astonishing scale.Record-breaking trafficking haulsPart of anti-trafficking campaign in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.On May 24, Reuters reported that Vietnamese customs officials at a port in the country’s south had seized more than 5 tons of pangolin scales hidden in a shipment from Nigeria. This came just nine days after authorities at the biggest port in northern Vietnam, Hai Phong, discovered 8.3 tons of pangolin scales, also shipped from Africa.These seizures occurred less than two months after Singaporean customs officers confiscated 12.9 tons of pangolin scales worth $52.3 million at the island nation’s port, believed to be the largest such seizure in history. The shipment, which included 177 kilograms (390 pounds) of elephant ivory, was transiting from Nigeria to Vietnam. Singapore Customs and the National Parks Board estimated that up to 17,000 pangolins had been slaughtered for their scales in this case.On July 23, Singapore announced yet another massive wildlife trafficking haul: 8.8 tons of elephant ivory, a record for the country, and 11.9 tons of pangolin scales in a ship heading to Vietnam from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.On July 28, AFP reported that officials at Noi Bai International Airport in Hanoi had discovered 55 pieces of rhino horn weighing 125 kilograms (275 pounds) encased in plaster. Reporting from Britain’s Telegraph added that the horns had arrived on an Etihad Airways flight from the United Arab Emirates, and at the time of writing the source country had not been announced.These seizures illustrate the desperate need for campaigns like “Be Their Bodhisattva,” as countries in Africa are rapidly being emptied of these species due to demand from Vietnam and China.Asked whether the campaign may have increased awareness among customs officials, leading to stronger diligence in uncovering wildlife trafficking, Baker said he couldn’t answer with certainty.“I can’t say for sure in the case of Vietnam that any of those seizures were resulting from this, but I think there’s got to be some effect,” he said.He cited examples of previous work in China when highlighting the impact such campaigns can have in official circles.“When we were working hard on the ivory ban in China, some people criticized us, saying we were just putting celebrities on billboards and what we really need to do is change government policy,” he said. “What I tried to explain is that we have a lot of anecdotal evidence that government leaders see these campaigns, and policymakers are people too.“For example, there was a legislative officer in the People’s National Congress, and when they announced a strengthening of their wildlife law to have a maximum penalty of 10 years, this guy in his written statement included the slogan of our campaign. We had never met him, but they do notice,” Baker said.Campaigning without shamingWhen it came to “Be Their Bodhisattva,” WildAid and CHANGE wanted to spark a conversation while avoiding ostracizing the few people who actually use products derived from pangolin scales, elephant ivory or rhino horn.“Our goal is really setting a new social norm,” Baker said. “We’re not trying to isolate the one guy who decided he wants to buy rhino horn because his liver is failing … It’s not a winning debate to challenge national heritage and cultural values, it’s more to raise other questions like, ‘We’re killing these animals, do we really want the blood on our hands?’ We hope that this is a reminder. We hope the daughter and the grandkids and the other people in the family tell their relative who bought it, ‘Hey, we saw that at the temple, the monk talked about how we shouldn’t be harming these animals, it’s not a good thing.’”Enforcement is the other side of this equation, and on that front Vietnam appears to be struggling. For example, no one has been prosecuted for the recent massive wildlife seizures.“They don’t track it to the buyer — that’s the next phase, it’s the Holy Grail, and it’s the difficulty in Vietnam,” Baker said.To highlight just how difficult this is, he cited a customs official at a port in Ho Chi Minh City that WildAid gave an award to after several ivory shipments were interdicted at the facility.“We ended up getting him in hot water with more senior officials because he was seen as taking credit,” Baker said. “You’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.”Banner image: Part of anti-trafficking campaign in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Photo by Michael Tatarski for Mongabay.About the reporter: Michael Tatarski is Editor-in-Chief of the Saigoneer and a Vietnam-based freelance journalist. You can find him on Twitter at @miketatarski. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this article. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Endangered Species, Environmental Education, Forests, Market-based Campaigns, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: The superb lyrebird’s song, dance and incredible vocal mimicry

first_imgOn this special show, we replay one of our favorite Field Notes episodes, featuring recordings of a songbird known for its own ability to replay sounds, including elaborate vocal displays and amazing mimicry of other species’ songs and even of trees blowing in the wind.Male superb lyrebirds are extravagantly feathered creatures who clear patches of forest floor to prepare a stage on which they dance and sing their complex songs in order to attract a mate.Female superb lyrebirds also sing plus they mimic other species as well as sounds from their environment, such as the creaking of trees in the wind.Anastasia Dalziell discussed her study detailing findings on the vocal mimicry of male superb lyrebirds and the dances the birds use to accompany specific songs. She also discussed a previous study of hers looking at the mimetic vocal displays of female superb lyrebirds, which she said “highlights the hidden complexity of female vocalizations” in songbirds. It’s summer in the North and we’re on holiday! So for today’s show, we replay one of our favorite Field Notes episodes, featuring field recordings of the superb lyrebird, an Australian songbird known for its elaborate vocal displays and mimicry of other species’ songs.Listen here: Almost exactly one year ago, on August 21, 2018, we first ran this conversation I had with Anastasia Dalziell, an ornithologist who has studied the superb lyrebird extensively. Male superb lyrebirds are extravagantly colored and feathered creatures who clear patches of forest floor to prepare themselves a sort of stage on which they dance and sing their complex songs in order to attract a mate. The birds’ repertoire doesn’t only include originals, however — sometimes they like to show off by mimicking the songs of other species so convincingly that even members of that species are fooled.Female superb lyrebirds are also known to sing songs and to make calls that capably mimic other species as well as sounds from their environment, such as the creaking of trees blowing in the wind. Even the clicks of camera shutters and the buzz of chainsaws are ‘replayed’ by these animals.When we spoke, Anastasia Dalziell and I discussed a study she had just published detailing her findings on the vocal mimicry of male superb lyrebirds and the dances the birds use to accompany specific songs. She also discussed a previous study of hers looking at the mimetic vocal displays of female superb lyrebirds, which she said “highlights the hidden complexity of female vocalizations” in songbirds. And she played a number of lyrebird recordings so you can hear the mimicry for yourself.Superb lyrebird in Marysville State Forest, Australia (© Donovan Wilson).Would you like to hear how Mongabay grew out of its founder’s childhood adventures in rainforests and a fascination with frogs? Or how a Mongabay editor reacted to meeting one of the world’s last Bornean rhinos? We now offer Insider Content that delivers behind-the-scenes reporting and stories like these from our team. For a small monthly donation, you’ll get exclusive access and support our work in a new way. Visit mongabay.com/insider to learn more and join the growing community of Mongabay readers on the inside track.If you enjoy the Mongabay Newscast, we ask that you please consider becoming a monthly sponsor via our Patreon page, at patreon.com/mongabay. Just a dollar per month will really help us offset the production costs and hosting fees, so if you’re a fan of our audio reports from nature’s frontline, please support the Mongabay Newscast at patreon.com/mongabay.You can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, the Google Podcasts app, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS, Castbox, Pocket Casts, or wherever you like to get podcasts, including Pandora and Spotify. Or listen to any of our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animal Behavior, Animals, Bioacoustics, Birds, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Interviews, Podcast, Research, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Brazil land reform head fired amid push to legalize cleared Amazon land

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Destruction, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation Article published by Karla Mendes Far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has fired army general João Carlos de Jesus Corrêa as the head of the National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA), a position he held since February of this year.Critics say the move yields to pressure from the powerful farm lobby to push legalization of cleared land in the Amazon, which could lead to increased deforestation in the region.According to news reports, Corrêa’s removal is tied to disagreements regarding the Bolsonaro administration’s plan to ease the process to regularize about 750,000 land deeds through the end of the year. Brazilian far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has fired the head of the federal agency in charge of the country’s land reform, a move critics say yields to pressure from the powerful farm lobby to push legalization of cleared land in the Amazon — and further increase deforestation in the region as it could create incentives to clear forest land.On Oct. 1, army general João Carlos de Jesus Corrêa was discharged as the head of the National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA), a position he held since February of this year. While the Brazilian government did not immediately confirm the decision, Corrêa told local magazine Veja: “I’m leaving with the peace of mind of having done an excellent job with my team.”Army general João Carlos de Jesus Corrêa, who was fired as the head of the National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA), a position he held since February of this year. Image by Elza Fiúza/Agência BrasilJosé Líbio de Moraes Matos, an economist who according to a local report was involved in the Eldorado do Carajás massacre where 19 landless farmers were killed in 1996, was nominated INCRA’s interim head on October 2.The decision about Corrêa’s dismissal followed an hour-long meeting on the afternoon of Sept. 30, hosted by Bolsonaro with leading agribusiness figures in his government, including Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina Dias and Luiz Nabhan Garcia, who leads the ministry’s land affairs department, according to news reports.“There is a huge concern that these processes will legalize irregular occupations,” said Adriana Ramos, policy director of Brazilian NGO Instituto Socioambiental. “First you deforest in order to occupy the land, then you request regularization,” she said.INCRA, an agency created in 1970 to regulate land reform and register rural properties, led the colonization of the Amazon during the military dictatorship, and more recently redistributes and entitles rural properties to landless settlements and farmers. In the Amazon, claims for titles are often on deforested land, raising questions about whether the measure will legalize cleared land and encourage further land grabbing.There are around 800,000 rural properties throughout the country without definitive land titles, according to government estimates. Corrêa’s dismissal will make the push for the government to meet its target to issue 750,000 land deeds this year easier under a proposed interim measure, according to Reuters. So far, fewer than 2,000 land titles were regularized through 2019, far less than the government’s goal, the report said. Corrêa and Nabhan have reportedly been butting heads on the issue for months. In his interview with Veja, Corrêa suggested there was friction with Nabhan: “I don’t want to comment [on him]. It won’t help. We can’t be destructive.”Nabhan, who also leads the powerful right-wing lobby group Democratic Rural Association, is actively pushing for the approval of an interim measure that would allow farmers to self-assess their land titles, making the process automatic. “Why create difficulties if we have the conditions, with georeferencing technology, to make it self-declared?” he said, comparing it to tax self-assessment, in the Reuters report.For Antônio Galvan, Garcia’s ally and vice president of Brazil’s soy farmers’ trade association, Aprosoja, Corrêa’s dismissal is a “necessary evil” to meet Bolsonaro’s ambitious goal of a fast-paced land regulation program. “If there isn’t a competent and dedicated team, the president won’t reach his goal of regulating a minimum of 600,000 land titles,” he told Mongabay. “This is a demand by rural producers and people living in rural settlements.” According to Galvan, the goal is to reach 750,000 approved land titles, but 600,000 is an established minimum.Ramos says the proposed measure makes the legalization of irregular land plots easier and may affect indigenous and quilombola communities. “This would make regularization easier in irregularly occupied areas, including those in territories claimed by traditional communities that still haven’t been recognized,” she added.INCRA is in charge of demarcating and issuing land titles to settlements known as quilombos, areas to where African slaves escaped from harsh working conditions. But even though Brazil’s 1988 Constitution enshrined the property rights of descendants of runaway slaves who live in quilombos, most of them have no formal deeds to prove ownership of their land.Agriculture Minister Tereza Cristina Dias and President Jair Bolsonaro in a ceremony in Brasília. Image by Valter Campanato/Agência BrasilCorrêa’s dismissal is the latest in a wave of controversial measures by the Bolsonaro administration to undermine environmental regulations to bolster economic activities in the Amazon region, including agribusiness and mining.In August, Bolsonaro fired the director of the Brazilian National Institute of Space Research (INPE) after denying data showing a sharp increase in deforestation in the Amazon. Agents from environmental bodies like Brazil’s environmental agency (IBAMA) and the Chico Mendes Institute (ICMBio), which protects the nation’s federal conservation units, have also faced routine sacking and intimidation since Bolsonaro came to power in January.Banner image caption: Illegal logging on Pirititi Indigenous land, in the Brazilian Amazon. Image by Felipe Werneck/IBAMA.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Deforestation continues to rise in the Brazilian Amazon

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon continues its upward trajectory according to data released today by the country’s national space research institute INPE.Monthly deforestation alert data showed that 1,444 square kilometers of forest in Brazil’s “Legal Amazon” — or Amazonia — were cleared during the month of September, bringing the area chopped down through the first nine months of the year to 7,604 square kilometers, an 86 percent increase over the same period last year.INPE put the area burned in the Amazon year to date at 59,826 square kilometers, a 97 percent increase in the area burned relative to last year.Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon is on pace to be the highest in over a decade. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon continues its upward trajectory according to data released today by the country’s national space research institute INPE.Monthly deforestation alert data showed that 1,444 square kilometers of forest in Brazil’s “Legal Amazon” — or Amazonia — were cleared during the month of September, bringing the area chopped down through the first nine months of the year to 7,604 square kilometers, an 86 percent increase over the same period last year. The area deforested is 127 times the size of Manhattan.INPE put the area burned in the Amazon year to date at 59,826 square kilometers, an area nearly the size of the state of West Virginia. That represents a 97 percent increase in the area burned relative to last year, although the number of fire hotspots recorded in the Amazon is only 30 percent higher.Much of the area that burned is pasture, scrub, and logged-over forest, rather than primary rainforest. Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Green, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests The monthly alert data puts deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon on pace to be the highest in over a decade. Brazil will release official figures for the “deforestation year”, which is measured from August 1 through July 31 using higher resolution satellite data, next month. Last year 7,900 square kilometers of forest in the Brazilian Amazon were cleared.Rising destruction despite global attentionThe new figures from INPE show that deforestation in Brazil remains unusually high despite recent global outcry over the issue. Attention peaked in late August when smoke from fires in the Amazon blackened the skies over Sao Paulo, prompting widespread condemnation of anti-environment policies being advanced by the Bolsonaro administration. Activists talked about boycotting Brazilian agricultural products, while the E.U. threatened to suspend a long-negotiated trade deal. Initially defiant, blaming environmentalists for the fires and rejecting offers of firefighting aid, the Bolsonaro administration eventually mobilized the army to combat the fires. But critics say the administration has not shelved plans to encourage forest conversion and weaken environmental protections in Earth’s largest rainforest.Between 2004 and 2012, annual deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon dropped by more than 80 percent, turning Brazil into a widely celebrated example of a country successfully curbing greenhouse gas emissions.The recent trend, coupled with Bolsonaro’s policies, has spurred concern among scientists and environmentalists that Brazil may be losing ground on its historical progress in reducing deforestation in the Amazon, possibly pushing the ecosystem toward an ecological tipping point, where vast areas of rainforest could shift toward a drier, savanna-like ecosystem. Scientists don’t know where that threshold lies, but some of the more pessimistic projections suggest that should deforestation return to the levels seen in the early 2000s, we could see significant temperature and precipitation impacts at a regional scale before 2030.CNES / Airbus image on Google Earth showing rainforest and deforestation at 9°28’8.18″S, 58°16’44.67″W.last_img read more

COP25: Brazil’s official presence diverges widely from its public persona

first_imgBrazil’s government presence was much shrunken at COP25, as compared to past climate conferences, and its delegation even opted out of hosting a presentation space — this despite the country’s being South America’s biggest economy and among the world’s top ten greenhouse gas emitters.The administration of President Jair Bolsonaro is controversial for its anti-environmental and anti-indigenous stance. Its policies have prompted resistance by Amazon indigenous and traditional rural populations.Environment Minister Ricardo Salles represented one face of Brazil at COP25, speaking publicly twice at the summit, and focusing mostly on agribusiness and economic development opportunities in Amazonia.Indigenous peoples and other activists showed a very different face at COP25, emphasizing government failures to protect the environment as well as indigenous and traditional peoples living in the Amazon. Half a million climate protesters take to the streets of Madrid while national delegations negotiate inside COP25. Image by Camila Nobrega.MADRID, Spain — Originally scheduled to host the 2019 UN Conference on Climate Change (COP25), Brazil entered the global media spotlight in November 2018 when newly elected president Jair Bolsonaro backed out of the event, even before taking office.Then came the stunning images in August of extensive Amazon fires, reported along with a 30% increase in deforestation under Bolsonaro — tree loss that some attribute to the president’s inflammatory rhetoric.COP25, after first being shifted from Brazil to Chile, finally landed In Madrid, where over the last two weeks Brazilian attendees seemed display at least two different — diametrically opposed — faces. On the one hand, there’s the Bolsonaro administration which will sign any new UN agreements coming out of this COP, and on the other, are the peoples living in the rainforest raising their voices in an attempt to influence policy.Press conferences, debates and conversations at COP pavilions, along with protest signs raised during street demonstrations, denounced the nation’s Amazon degradation, while praising the leading role of indigenous peoples in promoting forest preservation and diverse sustainable livelihoods.Meanwhile, Government representatives seemed to be talking about a different country. Brazil’s delegation, led by Environment Minister Ricardo Salles, advocated Amazon development and rapid agribusiness expansion.Brazil’s Environment Minister Ricardo Salles speaks at COP25. Image by Camila Nobrega.Silence over fires and murders In the COP25 plenary on Tuesday, December 10, Minister Salles presented himself as a representative of over 20 million people living in the Amazon region, highlighting it as the land with the “biggest biodiversity in the world, with 60% of native forest preserved.” He did not address denunciations by activists concerning the increase in deforestation or escalating violence toward traditional populations.In his first public appearance at COP25 on Monday, December 9, Salles focused on Brazil’s agribusiness sector: “When I hear about [farmers and ranchers] making the areas already opened more efficient, this is the right vision. Better technologies, better conditions, this is one of the factors that discourages the opening of new areas [to deforestation]. Besides that, something directly connected to our position here at COP25, the monetization of environmental services.”Salles did not respond to questions about the murder of two indigenous representatives, Raimundo and Firmino Guajajara, on Saturday December 7, on the BR-226 highway, between the municipalities of Boa Vista and El Betel, in Maranhão state. But a minute of silence was held in honor of the two at the event. Nor did the minister comment on data showing surging deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon.The minister’s Monday speech didn’t take place at the Brazilian government booth, a major presence at past COPs. That’s because the Bolsonaro administration decided against having one. Instead, Salles spoke from a space organized by Brazilian civil society.The Brazilian delegation at COP25 works out of a small, inconspicuous office, a blue cube whose door always seems closed and locked. For the first time since 1992, the government denied accreditation to civil society to take part in the official delegation.Brazil’s divided personality was especially on display at the Monday speechmaking event: Salles, with his Amazon pro-development views, talked just after Caetanno Scannavino, coordinator of the Saúde e Alegria project, one of the socioenvironmental NGOs recently targeted by a government investigation, with the seizure of its computers by the Military Police of Pará.As part of that same law enforcement operation, four volunteer forest firefighters in Alter do Chão municipality were arrested for allegedly starting Amazon fires in September. The four, members of a local socioenvironmental NGO, have since been released with the legitimacy of the charges questioned due to lack of evidence, raising concerns about the criminalization of social movements in Brazil. “Obviously, we did not set fire to the forest. We had a nightmare!” Scavinno joked.Joênia Wapichana, an indigenous federal deputy, criticized the Bolsonaro government’s silence on indigenous rights: “I would like to talk about Brazil as a country of life protection. But we are living with omission, and fear of listening to the indigenous population.”Energized by the support they’ve been getting from the government, Brazilian agribusiness representatives hyped “Rural Producers: The Great Environmental Partner,” and participated in COP debates promoting the use of agribusiness technologies to expand croplands.Resistance by climate activists is growing stronger as developed and developing nations, including Brazil, look likely to fall short of meeting their carbon reduction pledges set under the 2015 Paris Agreement. Image by Camila Nobrega.Opposing viewpoints on land regularizationCOP25 is especially focused on finalizing mechanisms for an international carbon market. In response, the Brazilian government talked solely about efficiency and technology, especially relating to agribusiness.The subject of land regularization was covered too, though mostly as it benefits rural producers, with no mention of the land rights of traditional populations. Bolsonaro, absent at COP25, continues to assert that there will be no new demarcation of indigenous lands, and that he wants to pass laws allowing mining and agribusiness within indigenous reserves, currently outlawed.After the first Salles event, the President of the Brazilian Senate, Davi Alcolumbre, told the press in Madrid: “Self-declaration is the way to simplification.” He was referring to a just announced Bolsonaro presidential provisional measure greatly easing regulations for registering Amazon land claims, with little proof required by potential land grabbers wishing to occupy and clear forestlands held in common by the government.So called “self-declaration” of land ownership is very controversial, especially in a country with 18 different land registries, and millions of hectares where conflicting and overlapping land claims occur often between indigenous and traditional communities (with sustainable forest livelihoods), and elite outsiders (who wish to profit from forest conversion to croplands and pasture). Experts warn that self-declaration has the potential for extensive fraud, land grabs, and increased rural conflict and violence.Sonia Guajajara, representative of the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB), participates in a COP25 panel. Image by Camila Nobrega.500,000 march in Madrid, land rights a priorityAnother face of Brazil was presented in the Climate March, which brought half a million people into the streets of Madrid last Friday under the banner of climate justice, with the additional theme of rural land rights. The protest was organized in partnership with the Social Climate Summit, taking place in parallel with COP25 at the Complutense University of Madrid. Youth activist Greta Thunberg and actor Javier Bardem were prominent during the march, but so were indigenous protestors.Among them, Sonia Guajajara, representative of the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB), who, on stage at march’s end, declared: “Bolsonaro is not just a problem for Brazil. The Amazon is burning and its defenders and our livelihoods are being murdered!”The indigenous leader also commented on Salles’ Monday speech in a later COP25 interview: “We are obliged to hear from the minister that we have to take care of people, while the murder of indigenous people and invasions of our lands are increasing, and Brazil stands against the inclusion of human rights in Article 6,” she said, referring to the mechanism for regulating carbon markets under the Paris Agreement, the main focus of rulemaking at this COP.Preliminary data from 2019 from the Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI) indicate that in the first nine months of Bolsonaro’s administration, 160 cases of invasion of indigenous lands were registered — twice the number as last year.CIMI President Antonio Eduardo de Oliveira commented to Mongabay: “We regret the position of the Brazilian government — a backlash contrary to the protection of our future and the planet, and [falsely] placing indigenous peoples as an obstacle to progress. The government’s policy goes against the federal constitution [of 1988] and the [international] treaties to which Brazil is a signatory.”A representative of the Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon (COIAB), Tabea Casique Coronado, said Brazil has an enormous responsibility to protect the Amazon, both at home and also at the COP negotiations, “But the government does not dialogue with traditional Latin American populations.”Banner image caption: Signs of the times in the streets of Madrid at COP25. Image by Camila Nobrega.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Forests, Green, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation, United Nations last_img read more

Germany or Brazil? – Four local sports administrators evenly divided

first_imgFour leading local sports administrators are split down the middle between defending champions Germany and five-time winners Brazil a day before the 2018 FIFA World Cup kicks off at 10 a.m. tomorrow in the 81,000-seat Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. Hosts Russia will face Saudi Arabia in the opening match. Jamaica Boxing Board of Control secretary Leroy Brown and Jamaica Cricket Association President Wilford ‘Billy’ Heaven have picked Germany to become repeat champions, while Jamaica Golf Association President Peter Chin and Jamaica Volleyball Association boss Rudolph Speid have put their support behind Brazil. Brown, like many Jamaicans, is a diehard Brazil fan but he feels Germany will emerge champions when the final is played on July 15. “Deep down in my heart, I am a Brazil man. They give you memories that you never forget. They are the team I am looking forward most to watch. I personally think that the Germans will be methodical and the team that is most organised. Germany are the team most likely to win and I think that the Germans will win the World Cup. Heaven admitted that he has been a long-time supporter of the Germans. “Germany have been my international team. Brazil have a young team with some gifted players, and there are other teams also in the reckoning. However, I am going with Germany because of their style of play, that kind of long-ball thing. They are able to find others from a distance and the have resolute players who don’t give up. Those are the qualities that I really admire in the Germans.” Chin, a versatile sportsman who has played hockey, football and did some athletics way back in the 1970s, strongly believes that the Brazilians have the team to win this year. “I would say on paper that Brazil are the strongest team. They have a solid all-round team. I have never backed Brazil in a World Cup in the past. However, based on the team that they have now they will be difficult to beat. Brazil are solid in the goalkeeping area, defence, midfield and forward line,” Chin said. Speid, who is also the boss at Red Stripe Premier League outfit Cavalier, is solidly behind Brazil, and he added that their star player Neymar will shine at the tournament. “I am going with Brazil. They have no weaknesses and top man Neymar is a player that doesn’t choke. I have never seen him choke in any competition. Brazil are certainly the strongest team at the World Cup,” Speid said.last_img read more

SEA Games: Nesthy Petecio outclasses Burmese foe for boxing gold

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next NFA assures ample rice supply in ashfall, eruption-affected areas LATEST STORIES MOST READ Thailand reports case of coronavirus from China Philippines’ Nesthy Petecio celebrates after defeating Myanmar’s Oo Nwe Ni to claim the gold medal during the 30th South East Asian Games 2019 Women’s Featherweight (57 kg). INQUIRER PHOTO/ Sherwin VardeleonMANILA, Philippines—Nesthy Petecio displayed her championship pedigree and hacked out a decisive win over Myanmar’s Oo Nwe Ni to capture the women’s boxing featherweight gold medal of the 2019 Southeast Asian Games Monday at PICC Forum.The reigning Aiba World Champion was on target early in the fight, landing overhand rights down her Burmese foe’s temple in the first round.ADVERTISEMENT ‘People evacuated on their own’ No need to wear face masks in Metro Manila, says scientist Microsoft ends free Windows 7 security updates on Tuesday Leonardo DiCaprio, Taika Waititi, other stars react to Oscar nominations SEA Games: Melvin Calano’s personal best nets PH javelin throw gold Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)08:07Athletes treated to a spectacle as SEA Games 2019 officially ends06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball05:21Drama in karate: Tsukii ‘very sad’ over coach’s bullying, cold shoulder03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS) Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lava gushes out of Taal Volcano as villagers flee Petecio, who won her first SEA Games gold medal, then turned methodical in the next two rounds and put the fight under control with her jabs and counters for the 5-0 unanimous decision win,“At first I was nervous because she’s a tough opponent and this was a heavy fight for me because I was going to fight in the finals immediately,” said Petecio, who went straight to the finals after a bye, in Filipino.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSAndray Blatche has high praise for teammate Kai SottoSPORTSBig differenceSPORTSAlmazan status stays uncertain ahead of Game 4“I just prayed to God that ‘Lord when I won the gold in the World Championships You were with me, I pray that You’re here with me again.’” Taal Volcano’s lava fountain weakens, but Phivolcs says it’s not sign of slowing down View commentslast_img read more