A Philippine conservation park juggles funding needs with animal welfare

first_imgThe Mari-it Wildlife and Conservation Park on the island of Panay is home to at least 62 threatened animals that are endemic to the Philippines.Its funding dried up in 2014, and after struggling to get by on scant resources from the local government, the park decided in June this year to open its gates to tourists.Since then, however, it has had to deal with numerous instances of rowdy tourists taunting the animals, highlighting the need for better management mechanisms to protect the animals under its care while still finding a way to stay financially secure. ILOILO, Philippines — A pig growled in pain. I walked up to the enclosure of sharp, rusty metal grill to see a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons), known locally as baboy talunon, crouched on the ground, with another pig biting its back. The wounded pig squealed again and ran around the enclosure.“The wounded pig might be a victim of the alpha male,” said J.B. Ian Bullo, the college veterinarian. “He has been killing the male warty pigs to assert his position in the herd.” Bullo added that a few months earlier, the aggressive male warty pig broke out of his enclosure and “murdered a family of a pig.”Aggression among animals in closed spaces, especially warty pigs, is common in the conservation park, Bullo says. The park started out as a breeding facility and eventually became a rescue center for species saved from foiled attempts at poaching and trafficking.Mari-it, from the West Visayan word that means “dangerously enchanted,” is a refuge for many endangered species endemic to the central Philippine group of islands known as the Visayas. These are species facing food shortages, habitat loss and even extinction as a result of deforestation and hunting. The 1,000-hectare (2,470-acre) conservation park occupies land owned by the West Visayas State University-College of Agriculture and Forestry (WVSU-CAF) in the village of Jayubo in Lambunao, a town in the province of Iloilo. The area features a small mountain surrounded by various endemic plant species and waterfalls, a natural habitat of many of the native species, making it a perfect location for the park.It was started more than 25 years ago, after then-project manager Lucia Lastimoza saw three live spotted deer being sold by highlanders in town to be killed and cooked as sumsuman, a side dish served during a drinking session. “Why would they slaughter these beautiful animals?” Lastimoza recalled asking herself. “I bought them with the intent to take care of and breed them.” She placed them in a pig enclosure at the WVSU-CAF facility, spruced up to suit the needs of the spotted deer.In 1993, Lastimoza was invited by the IUCN to train in wildlife conservation and management, and when she returned to the Philippines she established the conservation park. Today, Mari-it is home to 17 endangered Visayan spotted deer (Rusa alfredi); 38 critically endangered rufous-headed hornbills (Rhabdotorrhinus waldeni) and Visayan hornbills (Penelopides panini); 11 critically endangered Visayan warty pigs; five vulnerable Visayan leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis rabori); and two critically endangered Panay cloud rats (Crateromys heaneyi), among others. The animals, saved from wildlife trafficking, poaching and encroaching on residential areas, come from various parts of the island of Panay in the Visayas, and are feared to go extinct within five to 10 years if left in the wild.For decades, Mari-it enjoyed sufficient funding; it was once the largest hornbill breeding facility in the world. But things changed nearly six years ago when funding ceased, precipitating a management decision that would put the animals’ welfare in jeopardy.‘Dearth of funding’The park was supported technically and financially by various international animal conservationists and organizations until 2014. When the money stopped coming in, the Lambunao municipal government stepped up and allocated a million pesos ($25,000) for the park’s operations every year. “But this amount is not enough to cover the food supply for the animals, the maintenance of infrastructure, and the number of skilled staff to take care of the animals,” said Bullo, who also acts as the park’s assistant director.Ensuring an adequate supply of the appropriate food for the wide range of species at the park is challenging. Though the majority forage on insects, smaller animals and plants, the Visayan hornbills and leopard cats demand a very specific diet. “Hornbills’ food requires to be rich in carotene, Vitamin C and carbohydrates,” Bullo said. “These are the necessary vitamins … Otherwise, they are not capable of breeding.” When food gets scarce, hornbills tend to abandon their eggs. Meanwhile, the leopard cats, carnivores that mainly feast on rodents in the wild, are fed chickens that the park raises on its own poultry farm.A Visayan tarictic hornbill (Penelopides panini) feeding a juvenile. Image by Arnel MurgaWhen food supplies run low, the caretakers, who treat the animals as they might their own children, chip in. “Sometimes, we use our own money to buy their food,” said caretaker Myra Cabayao. But even the caretakers haven’t been spared from the funding slash: there were five of them working at the park in 2014, but today there are only two.Animals in captivity also require bigger enclosures to avoid confinement-specific stressors, which lead to the kind of aggressive behavior seen among the warty pigs. “Most of the existing cages at Mari-it have limited space and in [dire] need of maintenance. The [enclosures] are covered with rust and are weak [with age] that some animals easily destroyed the fences to escape and return to the wild,” Bullo said.Ideally, the conservation park seeks to nurse its animals back to health with the hope of eventually releasing them back into the wild. But outside, human threats persist, says Lastimoza. To create an environment fit for these species to thrive there’s a need for a thorough education campaign at the grassroots level, adequate policy measures to protect the species, and consistent surveillance mechanisms — none of which come for free.“There is a need to conduct biodiversity survey, GIS mapping, development of site management, and habitat restoration where these animals should be released,” Lastimoza said. “Other than that, the community must also be involved and educated about wildlife conservation. These entail money.”The group previously sought to reintroduce some of the animals back into their natural habitats. In 2010, Lastimoza was in talks with the local government to turn Sicogon Island, spanning 1,100 ha (2,720 acres) in northern Iloilo, as a refuge for the hornbills and spotted deer. This fell through, however, after the local government opened the island for commercial use in 2013, leasing it to a major developer for a prime tourism project.A male Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons), a critically-endangered species. Image by Arnel MurgaAll these factors have taken their toll on the park. “The dearth of funding may mean the death of the conservation park,” Bullo said. “This situation puts the animals at risk.” To keep it running, the park and the local government have decided to take an alternative route: to open its gates to tourists.Tourism funds bring in cash but cause stress to wildlifeThe park opened to the public in June, and in an age of social media and budget travel, its popularity soared. When poultry farmers found two juvenile Visayan leopard cats in July in the village of Pontevedra, in neighboring Capiz province, they turned them over to Mari-it. The news went viral, bringing tourists flocking to the park to see the spectacularly spotted cats named Ponte and Vedra; today, the park gets an average of 100 visitors per month.The park rolled out the welcome mat: it mounted animal-shaped sculptures at the entrance, signboards with detailed descriptions of each species, and paved the paths between enclosures. It also posted ethics reminders: “Observe silence,” “Don’t harm the animals,” and “Don’t feed the animals” signs are peppered throughout the park.Tourists pay an entrance fee of 20 pesos (35 U.S. cents) and an additional 20 pesos as an “environmental fee,” which helps pay for the park’s operating costs. “The park needs funds,” said Jeniffer Osorio from the Lambunao tourism office. “That is why we are promoting Mari-it as an ecotourism site to become a self-sustaining park on its own.”But it hasn’t all been smooth sailing. By the entrance, motorcycle taxi drivers waiting for fares taunt a Philippine long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis philippensis), a common monkey species; in the area allocated for spotted deer and warty pigs, the cacophony of the tourists disturbs the deer during feeding time and sends them hiding in the bushes. In the hornbill area, tourists often shake the enclosure fence to prod the birds into moving so that they can get it on video.The park’s visitors have caused stress to animals like the Visayan spotted deer (Rusa alfredi). Image by Arnel Murga“There is really need to look at how [tourists] act here,” Cabayao said. The attendants have received numerous and persistent reports about the tourists’ bad behavior causing stress among the animals. But there aren’t enough staff at the park to police the tourists. And though they bring in much-needed cash, the tourists do more harm than good, Myra says.Conservation park success stories abound, but their failures are rarely talked about. There’s a fear that Mari-it, in being opened up to the public in an attempt to stay afloat, now faces the prospect of doing lasting harm to the animals in its care.“The tourists should be given orientations about the do’s and don’ts before they enter the park,” Bullo said, adding that they plan to address these concerns. But for Lastimoza, who retired last year, “the visitors need to be managed so that they will not be threats to the animals in captivity.”“Converting the park as a tourist site has indeed brought the needed money,” Lastimoza said. “Otherwise, the situation of the animals, even if they are in the park now, remains the same: They are just waiting for their extinction.”Banner image of a Visayan leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis rabori), a vulnerable species that can be spotted in the forests of Cebu, Panay and Negros islands in the Visayan region in the Philippines. Image by Arnel MurgaFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by leilani Animal Behavior, Animals, Birds, Conservation, Conservation Finance, conservation players, Critically Endangered Species, Mammals, Video, Videos, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife consumption, Wildlife Rehabilitation, Wildlife Rescues, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Plan to lift baby lobster export ban draws fire in Indonesia

first_imgIn 2016, Indonesia’s then fisheries minister Susi Pudjiastuti implemented a ban on the export of baby lobsters in a bid to protect the sustainability of the creatures in the wild.But now, Susi’s successor, Edhy Prabowo, is looking to lift the ban in an effort to boost the country’s economic growth from the fisheries sector.Environmentalists criticized the plan, saying it would threaten the population of wild lobsters that are crucial for a healthy marine ecosystem. JAKARTA — Environmentalists in Indonesia have lambasted the government’s plan to reopen exports of lobster larvae, saying the move will threaten the sustainability of these creatures that play a key role in a healthy marine ecosystem.Indonesian fisheries minister Edhy Prabowo said on Dec. 16 that he might allow selling baby lobsters abroad in an effort to boost the Southeast Asian country’s economy. Edhy’s predecessor, Susi Pudjiastuti, banned exports in 2016 in an effort to protect the animal.“There are people whose livelihoods depend on catching lobster larvae — they sell them, they get money, they live,” Edhy said in a statement. “I just want to focus on how they can get a job first.”Lobsters are a top commodity in Indonesian fisheries sector. Image courtesy of Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries.Susi’s decision to impose the ban was both praised and criticized, with some saying it would harm small businesses. The northern coast of Indonesia’s Java island is a center of lobster larvae production.Despite the ban, Indonesia’s black market for baby lobsters has continued to thrive. In Jan-Oct 2016, authorities reported smuggling cases of 800,000 lobster larvae valued at 124.8 billion rupiah ($8.9 million). The creatures are sold to Vietnam, Singapore and China, where they can be raised and sold at much higher prices.Edhy said Indonesia still lacked the infrastructure to cultivate baby lobsters in an aquaculture scheme. “If we don’t raise these lobster larvae, they’ll die — their survival rate in the wild is only 1%,” he said.To keep wild populations in check, Edhy said he would implement a quota scheme for exporting baby lobsters and order lobster cultivators to release 5% of their harvest back to the wild.“Don’t let growth be hampered only because we always hide behind the mask of environment,” Edhy said. “I also want economic growth that doesn’t damage the environment. Both must go in line together.”The plan has received a backlash from marine observers in Indonesia who say reopening exports will lead to overfishing of the animal despite efforts to control the quota.“Lobster larvae is a germplasm in our ocean,” Abdi Suhufan, the national coordinator of advocacy group Destructive Fishing Watch (DFW) Indonesia, told Mongabay. “There are only five countries in the world that have lobster larvae, namely Canada, England, the United States, Indonesia and Australia.”Susi defended her decision to ban baby lobster exports, writing in tweet that the infrastructure to raise lobsters was already available in their natural habitat, namely coral reefs and the sea floor. “That’s why we must protect coral reefs and not sell [larvae],” she said.Susi also criticized Edhy for allowing exports despite the animal’s low survival rate in the wild.“Lobsters are one of the natural resources that can be accessed or fished easily with a pole or trap by small-scale coastal fishers,” she said in another tweet. “The state must well protect the source of livelihood for small fishers.”Indonesia has a thriving black market for baby lobsters. Image by Vinolia for Mongabay-Indonesia.Some observers believe the proposal to reopen exports was influenced by business interests affiliated with foreign enterprises looking for a massive supply of the larvae.“If they didn’t have such a huge influence, the policy to ban export of lobster seeds wouldn’t become a continuous polemic from Minister Susi to Minister Edhy,” Arifsyah Nasution, ocean campaigner at the NGO Greenpeace Indonesia, told Mongabay.To combat the illegal trade of lobster seeds, environmentalists are calling for the government to beef up monitoring and law enforcement instead of allowing the export of the larvae.“If the fishermen and the people are given the opportunity and support in developing a sustainable aquaculture to raise lobster seeds, this can be the solution as long as the government is serious in doing it,” Arifsyah said.Indonesia lacks the infrastructure for cultivating lobsters in order to boost the fisheries sector. Image by Melati Kaye/Mongabay-Indonesia.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Coastal Ecosystems, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Illegal Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Sustainability, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

Respect the Constitution and CCJ

first_imgDear Editor,There has been a lot of language of defiance following the CCJ’s ruling of June 18. Losing a no-confidence vote is not the end of political life. As the CCJ said, a no-confidence vote is an aspect of democratic governance in parliamentary democracies. It is used to hold governments accountable to Parliament and to the voters by way of their representatives. So many regimes (governments) and political leaders lost a no-confidence vote in recent times (including in the UK, Australia, Austria, Greece, Spain, Portugal, etc). Political life goes on. Some make a comeback; others quit. Democracy is strengthened and corruption is lessened. This is how countries get better governance. Rulers become fearful they could lose power if they don’t govern in the best interests of the nation. No one is cheated. All benefit from a no-confidence vote; a country learns from it. So why the defiance?A ruler must not take measures to evade the consequences of a successful no-confidence vote by taking instruction from the elections commission to set a date for elections. The law states that the President has to dissolve Parliament and hold elections within ninety days. Guyana is perhaps the worst case of a government seeking to avoid elections after a no-confidence vote by invoking the name of the elections commission as an excuse. The law does not state that the President must consult with GECOM on its preparedness for elections. The elections commission is supposed to be permanently prepared for elections because a government can fall anytime. In fact, the law states that that the voters’ list must be continuously updated in preparation for elections. There is continuous identity registration of fourteen-year-olds so that eligible voters (attaining 18) would be on the voters’ list. Saying the list is not ready is a lame excuse. Saying that the list has names of the dead and migrants is also a lame excuse; those dead and migrants were also on every voters’ list including the one used last November for the local elections and last May 2015 elections that catapulted the coalition to office.No ruler should be fearful of facing the electorate – the true bosses of the politicians. A ruler can very well win re-election after losing a no-confidence vote or when counted out of the voting ring. Just last month, the Australian PM won re-election when he was all but counted out. The rulers of Austria, Greece, Israel, and several other countries have decided to face the electorate after the Parliament lost confidence in them (even though a formal vote was not taken). The ruler of the United Kingdom decided to step down after failing to get a majority of MPs to back her. We should not forget that former President Donald Ramotar “fired himself” rather than face a no-confidence vote – that is an option of a country and is also an aspect of democracy. Basdeo Panday of Trinidad also fired himself in December 2001 and called elections that he lost rather than face a no-confidence vote.President David Granger is a military man and I am sure he will do the right and honourable thing; he knows what are orders and will subject himself to the orders of the court (CCJ). I am confident the President will dissolve Parliament very soon and begin consultation with the Opposition Leader on the replacement of his unilateral appointee of GECOM Chair.The court was very clear that the appointment of James Patterson violated the Constitution. The President was misadvised that he could act unilaterally in appointing the Chair of GECOM. The court has so informed him that the process he used to appoint Patterson was flawed and a violation of the Constitution. There must be consultation with the Opposition Leader, who will provide six names and the President will choose one as GECOM Chair; there is no way around that process. I think President Granger will act accordingly.Separately, I am disappointed with the incendiary language used by Prime Minister Moses Nagamootoo and Finance Minister Winston Jordan – “there is going to be war” if there is no house-to-house registration. Both know that the law does not call for house-to-house registration, in fact, the CCJ also made reference to this point. That kind of militant language of violence belongs to a bygone era. As the CCJ judges said, the country can’t go back to the period of Burnhamism or authoritarian rule. The law is very clear that once a government loses a no-confidence vote, it must resign, serve as a caretaker, and hold elections within ninety days. The CCJ will not allow a violation of the Constitution, having drawn heavily from the language in the Constitution in rendering the unanimous judgment in favour of the no-confidence vote.Even the court noted that there is no need for house-to-house registration of voters; names not on the list can be added. Those who migrated or the dead, the latter in particular, can’t turn up to vote or can the latter vote as happened in 1968, 1973, 1978, 1980, and 1985.Nagamootoo has had a reputation of championing democracy since his high school days in the 1960s. It would be disingenuous of him to evade democratic practices by threatening violence if Government does not get its way. That is not the result of a no-confidence vote and how the system works. The no-confidence vote allows the polity to cleanse or revitalise itself.All sides must pull back on this talk of violence, desist from advocating delayed elections, and respect the rule of law as clarified by the learned judges of the CCJ – new elections within ninety days from June 24.Yours truly,Dr Vishnu Bisramlast_img read more

CAL cancels Florida flights as Irma approaches

first_imgCaribbean Airlines, according to an article in the Trinidad Express, has advised that due to Hurricane Irma, the following flights for September 10 have been cancelled:BW414 from Kingston to Nassau, BW415 from Nassau to Kingston, BW031 fromWaves crash against the seawall as Hurricane Irma slammed across islands in the northern Caribbean on Wednesday, in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, September 6 (Reuters/Alvin Baez)Kingston to Fort Lauderdale, BW030 from Fort Lauderdale to Montego Bay, BW039 from Montego Bay to Fort Lauderdale, BW036 from Fort Lauderdale to Kingston, BW484 from Port of Spain to Miami, BW483 from Miami to Port of Spain, BW480 from Port of Spain to Fort Lauderdale, BW481 from Fort Lauderdale to Port of Spain, BW482 from Port of Spain to Orlando and BW485 from Orlando to Port of Spain.Passengers are advised to contact the airline’s reservation offices for rebooking on the next available service.According to the Trinidad Express article, affected customers travelling on September 10, 2017, will be permitted to change or cancel their reservations without penalty subject to the following conditions:* Passengers must have a confirmed ticket issued before September 10, 2017.* Passengers that choose to have their tickets refunded, must do so by September 17, 2017.* Passengers that choose to change their reservations, must complete their travel by September 17, 2017, unless travel on the ORIGINAL booking was after this date.  Travel must be in the same cabin as the original.* Caribbean Airlines WILL NOT be responsible for arrangements or transportation to/from an alternate airport or hotel/overnight expenses incurred by affected passengers.last_img read more

Sacked Fenati apologises for grabbing rival rider’s brake

first_imgBoth riders were speeding around the Misano track on Sunday when Fenati — aboard a Marinelli Snipers-run Kalex bike — leaned over and pressed Manzi’s brake lever. Manzi briefly lost his balance before regaining control of his Suter bike.Fenati’s actions followed Manzi’s attempt to overtake him a few laps earlier, with both riders running off the track.“I apologise to the world of sport. This morning, with a lucid mind, I wish it had just been a bad dream,” Fenati said in a statement. “I made a disgraceful gesture, I was not a man! A man would have finished the race and then he would have gone to race direction to try and get some justice for the preceding incident.“I shouldn’t have reacted to provocation,” continued Fenati. “A horrible image of me and of the sport has come out. I’m not like that, people who know me well know that! “In my career, I’ve always been a fair rider. Last year I was one of the few who was not penalised, I have never put someone else’s life in jeopardy, on the contrary, I have always maintained that there are riders on the track who are dangerous because of their riding style.”He added: “It’s true, unfortunately I have an impulsive character, but my intention was certainly not to hurt a rider like me, rather I wanted to make him understand that what he was doing was dangerous and how I could also have done something similar to what he did to me!“I just want to apologise to everyone. Now I will have time to reflect and clear my head.”Fenati’s team had early confirmed they were severing his contract “for his unsporting, dangerous and damaging conduct for the image of all”.“With extreme regret, we have to note that his irresponsible act endangered the life of another rider and can’t be apologised for in any way,” the team said. “The rider, from this moment, will not participate in any more races with the Marinelli Snipers team.”– ‘Never seen behaviour as dangerous’ –“We couldn’t handle him,” says Italian star Valentino Rossi of hot-headed rider Romano Fenati. © AFP / Tiziana FABIFenati also lost his ride next season with he has lost his ride at Forward Racing, which will run in partnership with Italian manufacturer MV Agusta.“Our sport is already extremely dangerous, and any act which increases the risks involved for the riders is intolerable,” Forward Racing owner Giovanni Cuzari said.“We cannot accept behaviour of this type from one of our future riders.”Giovanni Castiglioni, president of MV Agusta, said: “In all my years of watching sport, I have never seen behaviour as dangerous as this. A rider who can act like this can never represent the values of our company, and our brand.”Fenati also made headlines for kicking out at Finnish rider Niklas Ajo during the Moto3 warm-up at the 2015 Argentinian Grand Prix.He was dropped for disciplinary reasons during the 2016 season by the Sky Racing Team VR46, owned by Italian motorcycling star Valentino Rossi.“I’m sorry,” said Rossi. “We had focused a lot on Romano, but we couldn’t handle him. It ended in failure.”Manzi was also penalised and will start six places back on the grid for the next Grand Prix in Aragon, Spain on September 23.“I don’t know how I managed to stay up,” said Manzi.“It’s difficult to forgive a gesture like that, where an opponent tries to kill a rival at over 200km per hour.”Fenati was 19th in the Moto2 standings with 14 points.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Italian Moto2 rider Romano Fenati has been sacked by his Marinelli Snipers Team for pulling a rival’s brake during the San Marino Grand Prix. © AFP / Michal CIZEKMilan, Italy, Sep 10 – Italian Moto2 rider Romano Fenati on Monday apologised for his “impulsive” behaviour after being sacked by his Marinelli Snipers Team for grabbing rival Stefano Manzi’s brake while riding at a speed of over 200kph during the San Marino motorcycling Grand Prix.The 22-year-old — who has also been banned for two Grand Prix and could face criminal proceedings — apologised for his “disgraceful gesture”.last_img read more

Injera inspires Kenya’s Main Cup dream

first_imgAdema would then convert Patrice Agunda’s try for a 24-0 second half lead. Substitute Eden Agero would score and convert his own try, before converting Fabian Olando’s try for the 38-0 result.The second game saw Injera move fourth on the IRB Sevens all time try scorers chart, his 161st try converted by Adema for a 7-0 lead against USA. Adema then converted Oscar Ouma’s try before Odhiambo grounded for a 19-0 half time lead.Odhiambo landed his brace after the restart, Kenya 24-0 up before Injera landed again with Eden Agero converting for a 31-0 lead. USA got their consolation try through Carlin Isle as the game ended 31-5.Against the All Blacks, a master class of contact offloading saw Joe Webber touchdown for his second try of the match and his country’s 14th of the tournament and soon after Waisake Naholo registed the fifth and final try to leave New Zealand once again the team to beat.The match against Australia is a repeat of last year’s match up at the same tournament that ended 21-14 to Kenya and the team will look to that result as they seek to further their Gold Coast Sevens campaign.The hosts bounced back from a 21-21 draw with Scotland, a match in which they led 21-0, to win their matches with Argentina and Samoa to the delight of the home crowd. 0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000NAIROBI, Kenya, October 12- Kenya will play hosts Australia in the Main Cup quarters of the Gold Coast Sevens after finishing second in Pool A following a 0-31 stuffing at the hands of defending HSBC World Series champions, New Zealand.Interim head coach, Felix Ochieng, led the side to breeze through to the last eight with a game to spare after Billy Odhiambo announced his presence on the world stage with a try in the opening match against Tonga before further tries from Collins Injera and Felix Ayange as well as a Biko Adema conversion saw Shujaa take a 17-0 lead at the interval against the Pacific Islanders.last_img read more

NASCAR drivers will have own channels

first_imgIn-car cameras started the revolt in television coverage of motor racing, and two new NASCAR concepts could further expand and change how viewers partake their sport this season. On Monday, ESPN will unveil its weekday NASCAR news show, NASCAR Now. The show will be a daily news program at 3:30 p.m. on ESPN2. “Nobody has done anything like this at all,” said Eric Shanks, DirecTV’s executive vice president of Entertainment. “NASCAR fans want to follow their drivers, know who they’re battling with, what’s happening, even if it’s not for the lead. This is definitely geared more toward the NASCAR fan, but on the flip side, it helps the more moderate fan understand the sport more.” DirecTV will offer the Daytona 500 for free to its subscribers, and will then require additional costs for the remainder of the season. NASCAR Now expects to produce daily recaps of what is happening in the sport. Erik Kuselias will be the show’s host with former NBA center Brad Daugherty, a former Craftsman Truck owner, as the analyst. Parnelli Jones, who won the 1963 Indianapolis 500 and earned USAC Indy Car, Stock Car and Sprint Car championships, received USAC’s Roger McCluskey Award of Excellence at the annual USAC Western Awards banquet in Arcadia. More revolutionary will be the Feb. 18 debut of DirecTV’s NASCAR Hot Pass, which will offer five separate channels of the season-opening Daytona 500, featuring five specific drivers. There will be a full production team for each Hot Pass channel, with six cameras, an announcer, team audio and real-time scoring. The main national feed will be shown in one corner. Jimmie Johnson, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Tony Stewart, Kevin Harvick and Michael Waltrip will be the first drivers to have their own channel. Other teams will be on the channels in future weeks. Seventy-two workers and three production vechicles will be needed to produce the channels. center_img USAC CEO Rollie Helmling presented the award to Jones at the Embassy Suites. El Monte’s Jerome Rodela, Tony Hunt, Cory Kruseman, Michael Faccinto, Tim Skoglund, Bobby Michnowicz and Jimmy Wysong were acknowledged for winning 2006 driving championships. Pasadena’s Josh Lakatos received the Joe Lynch Memorial Award, which was presented by Rodela. keith .lair@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2272 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

8 KPL players named in U-20 provisional squad ahead of Sudan friendly

first_img0Shares0000Kenya football under-20 team during training.PHOTO/Timothy OlobuluNAIROBI, Kenya, May 18 – Eight Kenyan Premier League Players have been drafted in the 27-man provisional squad named by Kenya’s football under-20 head coach John Kamau ahead of the friendly against Sudan slatted for May 27 at the Moi International Sports center Kasarani.Captain and Gor Mahia midfielder Amos Nondi headlines the team that also has Edwin Mukolwe from AFC Leopards, Chemelil Sugar’s Joseph Okumu and Thika United’s Collins Okumu. The team will be in action for the first time since being disqualified from the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations qualifiers on April 19 after Sudan successfully appealed that Kenya fielded five ineligible players when the two sides clashed in the first-leg of the preliminary round that ended 1-1.Eight players are from high school led by Laiser Hill Academy that produced four players led by Harambee Stars winger Ayub Timbe’s young brother Musa Masika.Division two has players from Kariobangi Sharks, Zoo Kericho and Nzoi Sugar FC with the team expected to report camp on Monday next week.Kamau’s charges will curtain raise the international friendly pitting hosts Harambee Stars and the Sudan senior team on the same day.However, the Stars team will not feature professional players like skipper and Southampton midfielder Victor Wanyama as head coach Stanly Okumbi is expected to field players who have potential to feature for the senior team.After the Sudan build-up, Stars will face Tanzania two days later at the same venue in another friendly.Kenya U-20 provisional squad;Timothy Odhiambo (SoNy Sugar), Edwin Mukolwe (AFC Leopards), Collins Okumu (Thika United), Joseph Okumu (Chemelil Sugar), Kevin Owino (Laiser Hill), David Owino (Laiser Hill), Samuel Semo (Korokocho Youth), Dennis Gicheru (Posta Rangers), Job Ochieng (Sunrise Academy /Mathare United U20), Baraka Badi -Thika United FC -RB John Macharia, (Laiser Hill), James Gichinji (KigumoBendera High Sch),  Musa Masika (Laiser Hill), Amos Nondi (GorMahia), Vincent Wasambo (K. Sharks), Ibrahim Shambi (Ulinzi Youth), Jeffery Owiti (Chemelil Sugar), Michael Ochieng’ (K. Sharks), AbdirahamMuhammed (Takwa Isiolo), Leroy Otieno (Gor Youth) James Mazembe (ZOO FC), James Kinyajui (Passenga Boys), Victor Ogendo (Nzoia Sugar), Bilali Mohammed (Bandari Youth), Michael Njuguna (KigumoBendera High school), Abdiweli Mohammed (Heights Academy), Andrew Kisuli (Sunrise Academy / Mathare United U20)0Shares0000(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

9-11 changed the world

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhy these photogenic dumplings are popping up in Los AngelesSecurity. Freedoms. Regular people finding their way in a world transformed by one terrible day. Five years have passed. What difference has it made for us all? Every day, the past and the present collide in Barbara Minervino’s life – in a household chore, in other ordinary acts, in a stranger’s question. “Are you divorced?” On a cruise, a rare escape, another passenger wonders why there’s no man by her side. “No, I’m a widow,” she replies. “Oh … heart attack?” Then Minervino has to decide, yet again, whether to explain that her husband, Louis, was murdered by terrorists in Tower One of the World Trade Center a few weeks shy of his 55th birthday. At home, she balances the checkbook, changes the light bulbs, determines which night the trash goes out on the curb. But she remembers how Lou once took care of those things, how she relished being his protected princess in their 25 years of marriage. She crawls into bed, alone, but still reflexively fumbles for his hand in the dark. They used to fall asleep holding hands, but now all she feels is the night air. “I’m here. I’m alive,” she says at her home in Middletown, N.J. “But if you ask me if I’m living, I’m not quite sure about that because there were two parts, and he’s the other part that I’m missing.” On Sept. 21, 2001, Minervino and her two daughters held a memorial for Lou, although the family had nothing to bury. On Sept. 6, 2002, the New York City medical examiner’s office called to report a fragment of Lou’s right shoulder had been found. It would be another year before Minervino could bring herself to bury it. Whether time can completely restore her faith is another matter. A devout Roman Catholic, Minervino consulted a priest in her endless quest to find a way to forgive. Then he suggested that if God had absolved the terrorists, they could be in heaven right alongside her husband. That made it impossible, for a while, for Minervino to recite the Lord’s Prayer. She simply couldn’t utter the passage, “Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.” Minervino has learned how to go on. But really moving on? That’s not so easy. Her mind says forgive; her heart screams don’t. Her mind accepts that Lou’s gone; her heart wants to keep him alive. “I still feel very much a part of a pair,” she says. Perhaps that’s why sometimes, in bed, she stretches her hand into the space beside her. Not by accident, but on purpose. And she imagines Lou can somehow hear when she whispers, “You can hold it.” For a long time, the first year maybe, ground zero still felt like Esther Regelson’s Main Street. She could picture the coffee shop where she and her boyfriend fed the sparrows. The Amish produce market where she shopped. The place she bought lottery tickets. The book store. She lived two blocks from the World Trade Center for 23 years. The stores at the bottom of the twin towers were her haunts, as comforting as home itself. On Sept. 11, the second jumbo jet to fly into the towers went right over her apartment building. She and her two cats were boated to New Jersey. When she returned six months later, ground zero was closed off by police barriers while it was cleaned of debris and bodies, then guarded by a metal mesh fence while the prolonged battle over what to build there and who would pay for it played out. Now, what Regelson calls “the Grand Canyon” and “the big hole” is as much a part of the neighborhood as the tall buildings and the Amish market were. Work has begun on a memorial and a skyscraper that will extend 1,776 feet into the sky. The height evokes the year of America’s independence, and the structure has been christened the Freedom Tower. Construction is occurring 70 feet below ground – heard but not often seen. “I can’t even picture anything else there right now,” Regelson says. “It’s so become part of my subconscious.” While she waits for something to emerge from the hole, the tiniest glimmers of her past have returned. She calls them red-letter days. The day her hallway was cleaned of the white dust that congealed into stringy shreds in her hands and caked everything she owned. The day the electricity came back on. The reopening last year of a restaurant across the street that she never favored – until it disappeared. The big hole has gouged a permanent chasm in the quality of her life. But she can’t afford to move and really doesn’t want to. She was devastated last month by word that a developer’s plans to build market-rate condos could force her out. “I keep things. I keep this neighborhood as my history,” she says as the tears come and don’t stop outside a new Starbucks that opened a block from her home this May on her 47th birthday, another red-letter day. “It’s my neighborhood, and I knew it when.” “That look like smoke?” Jim Greene is pointing to a grayish wisp hanging above a nearby mountain. It’s the height of fire season, and Greene has been busy clearing brush, thinning trees and moving wood piles around his cabin in the woods near Anaconda, Mont. Greene calls this “risk management.” He knows a little something about risk management. For three decades, Greene worked for the state of Montana, first helping to protect forests against the threat of wildfires and then heading up the state’s emergency management division – preparing for whatever risk Montanans might face: fire, floods, earthquakes. Then came 9-11, and concerns about natural disasters were overshadowed by the possibility of bombings and bioterrorism – even here, 2,300 miles from ground zero. Greene was on call 24 hours a day, often reacting to rumors. Legislators would ask him: “What do you think the terrorism threat is?” But because, even after 9-11, Greene wasn’t privy to all available intelligence, he was never entirely sure how to answer. The stress, in part, drove him to retire in 2003. He spends time at his cabin and fishing in Mexico, but risk management remains a priority. He trains first responders in mock disaster scenarios. And, this year, he was one of dozens of peer reviewers who analyzed states’ disaster plans for a Department of Homeland Security study. The question he tends to get nowadays: Are we, really, any safer? There’s no clear answer to that one, either. He visited five states and three U.S. territories as a homeland security reviewer. “They were prepared for the types of disasters that they were used to having,” he says. “They weren’t prepared for something that has never occurred in their lifetime.” There’s been progress: Tighter security at airports. More training for emergency workers. Broadened knowledge of biological agents. But Hurricane Katrina showed how ill-prepared the nation remains in responding to widespread catastrophe, while the London airline bombing plot showcased shortcomings in airport screening. Citizens think more about being prepared, Greene knows firsthand. Manyaugmented first-aid kits with canned food and bottled water. Folks are more wary on planes, in crowds. When Greene himself steps on a subway in Washington, D.C., he considers: What would I do if someone started shooting or set off a bomb or released sarin gas? Once paranoid, perhaps, these thoughts are now part of the American psyche. The grayish wisp, it turns out, was only a cloud. But Greene kept an eye on it until he was convinced. Peter Chase sits behind his desk, his life before and after 9/11 on display all around him. There is the picture of the carousel where he worked his first job as an amusement attendant. The red, white and blue banner that welcomed patrons a few years ago to the newly renovated public library he now oversees in Plainville, Conn. Then there’s the cartoon depicting a lineup of librarians under interrogation, and a poster that warns: “Shhhhh! Keep silent while we rifle through your personal records.” A soft-spoken man in shirt sleeves and striped tie, Chase once defended the right of libraries to stock a racy Madonna book. It was, at the time, one of the biggest controversies of his career. Then came the Patriot Act, an FBI demand for library records as part of a terrorism probe and the fight that turned Chase into a champion of American ideals. “I never expected to be called on to defend the Constitution,” he says. The debate over the delicate balance between maintaining civil liberties and fighting terrorism has only intensified in the years since Sept. 11, with details still coming to light about secret programs conducted in the name of national security. This year words like “warrantless wiretapping” became part of the nation’s lexicon. Civil rights activists called for investigations into reports that phone companies had forked over records of ordinary citizens’ calls for a National Security Agency database. And Chase was revealed as one of several “John Does” in a constitutional fight challenging the government’s power to demand library records without a court order. The FBI directive prohibited Chase from acknowledging any role in the matter. He could tell his wife only that he was involved in a secret case. He promised his son that he didn’t “expect” to be arrested. The case ended in June after authorities discounted the threat they were investigating. But Chase sees the world through newly cynical eyes. When he learned the government had been listening to international phone calls without warrants, he wondered if his own calls had been monitored. “We have to swing much more back in the direction of freedom and open government and trust in democracy,” says the librarian who has found his true calling. “We are far too secretive.” The three women – as average as any of us – live in a pretty suburb of Phoenix, work together each week at the Y. The mother who helps run the children’s playroom. The young wife who teaches kickboxing. The retired flight attendant who works the front desk. Hiba Elmoumou wears a head cover along with her candy-apple red “YMCA Staff” T-shirt. It brings questions, like those from a woman following a workout one day. “Are you Muslim? What do you believe in?” In today’s changed world, Elmoumou’s religious identity has made her a teacher – every conversation a chance to instill knowledge. “It’s a way to show not all people are alike. Not all Muslims are terrorists.” Outside at the swimming pool, little Sierra Crider scurries from a bug. “Jump to Mommy. I’ll protect you,” a woman shouts from the water. “Jump to Mommy. Let me protect you.” Nikki Crider, the kickboxer, is all about protecting her daughter. Before Sept. 11, Crider was a buoyant bride-to-be, planning a wedding and a new life. After, she grew obsessed with news programs about the attacks, cried when baseball fans belted out “America the Beautiful” – and she and her new husband reconsidered their dreams of having kids. “What’s going to happen when our child is an adult?” they wondered. “What kind of world will it be?” Then came Sierra, now 2 . “A blessing,” Crider says, though time has done little to assuage her fears for her child’s future. Already, she envisions the day when Mommy will have to explain words like “terrorism” and “9/11.” “I just hope I don’t have many things to explain to her when she gets old enough to ask.” At the front desk, Lynn Robbins scans membership cards with a smile. Serving people is her calling, the reason she became a United Airlines flight attendant in 1969 and remained a dedicated employee for 33 years. “We were called `The Friendly Skies,”‘ she says, “and I really tried to be that flight attendant.” After United 93 went down in a Pennsylvania field, she couldn’t be that anymore. She viewed her passengers as the enemy. She put the FBI on her cell phone speed dial. In 2002, she retired. The simple joy of meeting new people. Being able to mean it when she says, “Good afternoon.” Smiling without suspicion. Those things, Robbins has regained. But one thing is forever lost – for her and for us as a nation. “Maybe we were all ignorant that this type of hatred exists in our world today – and continues,” she says. “That naive innocence that we all had. We’ll never recapture that.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Five years. Is it enough time to begin moving on? A widow’s bed still feels empty, but she can balance the checkbook. She can function without him. In some ways. Is it enough time for the physical scars to mend? A crater remains where the towers soared, but the hum of construction promises new life, one day, in the void. Time heals, or so the saying goes. But when the hurt is so great, so unlike anything we’ve ever known, how much time does it take? And how much change does that time bring, to us as a nation and individuals? last_img

Agenda 10/9

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’ MEETINGS THURSDAY The North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce will hold a mixer, 5:30 p.m. at Maggie Moo’s, 19763 Rinaldi St. Call (818) 349-5676. SATURDAY The North Los Angeles Chapter of the California Association of Mortgage Brokers will be partnering with Habitat for Humanity for a workday, 7:15 a.m. at 11257 Borden St., Pacoima. Call (877) 623-4711 SEMINARS TODAY Women At Work will hold career planning courses for women, 6:30 p.m. Mondays from today through Nov. 13 at WAW, 50 N. Hill Ave., Suite 300, Pasadena. Call (626) 796-6870. TUESDAY center_img The city of Burbank’s Community Development Department will hold a workshop titled “Franchise Opportunities,” 6:30 p.m. at the Police Community Room, 200 N. Third St., Burbank. Call (818) 238-5198. WEDNESDAY Women At Work will hold a workshop to help job seekers older than 45, 6:30 p.m. at WAW, 50 N. Hill Ave., Suite 300, Pasadena. Call (626) 796-6870. THURSDAY California State University, Northridge’s Tseng College of Extended Learning will offer a class in “Public Administration and its Environment,” 6 p.m. weekly from Oct. 12 through Dec. 14 at CSUN, 18111 Nordhoff St., Northridge. Call (818) 677-5635. CONTINUING EVENTS TODAY The Stargazer Oriental Restaurant & Bar will host a business networking mixer at 5 p.m. at 6501 Fallbrook Ave., West Hills. Call (818) 704-6633. Temple City Toastmasters meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Live Oak Park, 10144 Bogue St., Temple City. Call (626) 444-1482. Pre-Paid Legal Services will meet at 7:15 p.m. at the Renaissance Hotel, 30100 Agoura Road, Agoura Hills. Call (818) 781-1111. The Winnetka Chamber of Commerce meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Monday of each month at Canoga Park Bowl, Canoga Park. Call (818) 348-6908. The Toluca Lake Lions Club meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays of each month at Paty’s Restaurant, 10001 Riverside Drive, Toluca Lake. TUESDAY The YMCA’s Coed Service Club meets at 6 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month at various restaurants. For more information, call (818) 841-0387. California Entrepreneur Women meets at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Carrows Restaurant, 18355 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 996-4226. The Mayor’s Office of International Trade offers free international-trade assistance the second Tuesday of each month at the Valley Economic Alliance, 5121 Van Nuys Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 379-7000. The Business Works Networking Group meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Carol’s Restaurant, Northridge. Call (805) 497-0092. To Network meets at 7 a.m. each Tuesday at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 377-0853. The Greater San Fernando Valley Business and Professional Women meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, call (818) 789-5414. The Kiwanis Club of Tarzana will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Paul’s Cafe, 18588 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 996-1020. Business Network International, Lunch Bunch Chapter, will meet at noon at Carousel Restaurant, 150 E. Angeleno St., Burbank. Call (818) 519-1717, Ext. 220. The Professional Business Network of the San Fernando Valley will meet at 7:05 a.m. at IHOP, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. For more information, call (818) 585-0632 or log on to www.leads4business.com. The Network Advantage of Santa Clarita will meet at 7:15 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, Magic Mountain Parkway, Valencia. Call (661) 702-9687. The Harbor chapter of Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe in Ventura. For more information, call (805) 647-3600. The Optimist Club in Action meets at 7 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Big Jim’s Restaurant, 8950 Laurel Canyon Blvd., Sun Valley. Call (818) 785-2877. The International Association of Administrative Professionals, Satellite Chapter, meets at 6 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Chaminade College Preparatory, 10210 Oakdale Ave., Chatsworth. Call (818) 704-0763. BizNet Online magazine will host a networking breakfast from 8 to 9:30 at Denny’s Restaurant, 9001 Tampa Ave., Northridge. Call (818) 892-7883, Ext. 6, or visit the Web site at www.biznetonline.com. Burbank Business Network International will meet at 7 a.m. at the Carousel Restaurant Holiday Inn, 105 E. Angeleno Ave., Burbank. Call Harvey Branman at (818) 954-9294. The Business Referral Group of Tarzana will meet from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the International House of Pancakes, 19100 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana. Call (818) 881-4900. The Computer Users Group meets at 7 p.m. each Tuesday at Granada Pavilion, 11128 Balboa Blvd., Granada Hills. Call Mariam Radcliffe at (818) 249-1629 or visit the Web site at www.tugnet.org. Empowerment Systems workshop: “Helping Achievers Succeed.” Call Steve Chichester at (661) 287-4753. Crescenta Valley Chapter of Ali Lassen’s Leads Club will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Decadence Espresso Bar, 3820 Ocean View Blvd., Montrose. Call (800) 767-7337. LeTip of Calabasas will meet at 7 a.m. at Marmalade Cafe, 4783 Commons Way, Calabasas. Call Glenn Neely at (800) 617-5626, Ext. 210. LeTip of Santa Clarita will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the International House of Pancakes, 24737 W. Pico Canyon Road, Stevenson Ranch. Call Dr. John at (661) 222-9021. Motivated Toastmasters will meet from 6:50 to 8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 5525 Sepulveda Blvd., Sherman Oaks. Call (310) 979-5777. North Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce Senior Services Networking Cluster will meet at noon at Carrows Restaurant, Devonshire Street, Chatsworth. Pre-Paid Legal Services meets Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at the Glendale Hilton Hotel, 100 Glenoaks Blvd., Glendale. Call (818) 781-1111. Power Partners of Santa Clarita will meet at 7 a.m. at Marie Callender’s, Magic Mountain Parkway and The Old Road, Valencia. Call (661) 298-5330. Premier Business Xchange will meet at 7:15 a.m. at the Woodland Hills Country Club, 21150 Dumetz Road, Woodland Hills. Call (818) 832-1463. Rising Star Toastmasters meets from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays of each month at Frank’s Restaurant, 6005 Vineland Ave., North Hollywood. (818) 982-9999. The Thousand Oaks Leads Club will meet at 7 a.m. at Mimi’s Cafe, 400 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks. Call (805) 371-0188. The Warner Center Rotary Club will meet at 8 a.m. Tuesdays at the Holiday Inn, 2101 Ventura Blvd., Woodland Hills. Call (818) 348-1440 or (818) 737-1347. The Zonta Club of Conejo Valley meets the first and third Tuesdays of each month at California Lutheran University, Thousand Oaks. Call Sandra Cherry at (800) 266-2077. The Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley hosts an economic and business development meeting, 8 a.m. the second Tuesday of even-numbered months at the Economic Alliance Conference Room, 5121 Van Nuys Blvd., Suite 200, Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 379-7000. The Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley hosts a livable and sustainable communities meeting, 8 a.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Economic Alliance BFG Boardroom, 5121 Van Nuys Blvd., Suite 200, Sherman Oaks. Call (818) 379-7000. The Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley hosts a business and education partnership meeting, 8:30 a.m. at L.A. Valley College, Fireside Room, 5800 Fulton Ave., Van Nuys. Call (818) 379-7000. WEDNESDAY Business Network International of Northridge will meet at 7 a.m. at Porter Valley Country Club, Rinaldi at Tampa. Call Marty Laff at (818) 886-4670. – Compiled by Kim Armendariz Note: Some events may require reservations or fees. The Daily News welcomes items for Business Agenda. All items should be received at least two weeks before event. Send to Business Agenda, P.O. Box 4200, Woodland Hills, CA 91365.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more