Martin crashes out of Tour, Froome takes the lead (Updated)

first_imgTour de France leader Tony Martin abandoned the race on Thursday after breaking his collarbone in a sixth stage crash that also sent 2014 winner Vincenzo Nibali and others tumbling in the final 500 metres.“He abandons,” an Etixx-Quick Step spokesman said of the German.Briton Chris Froome, Team Sky’s 2013 Tour winner, will take over as race leader going into Friday’s seventh stage, a 190.5 km ride from Livarot to Fougeres.He leads American Tejay van Garderen (BMC Racing) by 13 seconds.After a few days of crashes and nervous racing the peloton took it relatively easy on the Normandy coastline until the last kilometre when Martin lost his balance and several leading contenders followed him down.Among the casualties were Italian Nibali, Colombian Nairo Quintana and van Garderen as Martin’s team mate, Zdenek Stybar of the Czech Republic, sprinted to victory in the 191.5-km leg from Abbeville to Le Havre.Nibali had bruises on his knee while Quintana had blood on his arm.Quintana’s Movistar team mate Alejandro Valverde also crashed earlier in the stage, hurting his leg and buttocks. Both will continue the race, the team said.Slovakian Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo) was second in the stage and France’s Bryan Coquard (Europcar) took third place.Regulations state that on a flat stage a rider held up in an incident in the final three km is credited with the same time as the winner.That meant Martin retained the overall lead, until he withdrew, after being pushed by two team mates to the finish line.“I was unlucky. I don’t even remember how I went down. I touched the rear wheel of the rider in front of me (Coquard) but it’s the Tour, luck and bad luck are always close,” Martin told reporters.Swiss Fabian Cancellara, who held the overall leader’s yellow jersey earlier in the event, had to pull out because of a back injury after crashing on Monday.Froome narrowly escaped Thursday’s carnage, managing to keep his balance while Nibali leaned on him as he fell.Spain’s Alberto Contador (Tinkoff Saxo) is seventh, 36 seconds behind, while Nibali (Astana) is 12th and 1:38 adrift. Quintana lies 17th, 1:56 off the pace.“I don’t know why this happened like this 500 metres from the line. I’m ok, my shoulder and my leg touched the ground,” said Nibali.Daniel Teklehaimanot became the first African to wear the polka dot jersey for the mountains classification after the MTN-Qhubeka rider grabbed precious points in the three minor climbs of the day.last_img read more

A response to “On public interest in conservation and internet data”

first_imgCommentary, Conservation Technology, data, Editorials Article published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img This post is a response to “On public interest in conservation and internet data (commentary)”, which was published on Mongabay on July 15, 2019.This text was published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. In their letter, Correia and colleagues raise two issues about our original article (Burivalova et al. 2018). Their first point questions the proposition that a growth in absolute search volume reflects an increase in public interest. We fully agree that this is unlikely to be a straightforward relationship: it would be affected by disparities in internet access, different reasons for searching the internet, and so forth. See the full response in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.last_img read more

How bioacoustics can transform conservation – Wildtech event in Palo Alto

first_imgBioacoustics, Biodiversity, Conservation Technology, Environment, events, Green, Remote Sensing, Technology And Conservation, Wildtech Article published by Rhett Butler On October 17th Mongabay is holding a WildTech discussion panel on the potential for bioacoustic monitoring to transform conservation. The event is being hosted by the Patagonia store in Palo Alto, CA.Panel participants include University of Wisconsin ecologist Zuzana Burivalova, Conservation Metrics CEO Matthew McKown, and Mongabay Founder Rhett A. Butler.Doors open at 6:30 pm for snacks, beverages, and networking. The panel discussion begins at 7:15 pm.Admission is free but space is limited, so please RSVP. Satellites have revolutionized forest monitoring, but there remains a major gap in biodiversity monitoring in forests since scientists can’t directly measure factors like hunting, sub-canopy fires, the impact of invasive animals, and light degradation very well from space. Bioacoustics — the use of sound recorders in nature — can help fill the gap. By capturing an entire soundscape, they can document a wide range of animals and detect very minor changes in ecological communities. They can also be useful for real-time interdiction by detecting gunshots, chainsaws, and the sound of motorbikes and truck engines and relaying alerts to local communities or authorities, as pilot projects implemented by Rainforest Connection have shown. In the future, large-scale deployment of networked bioacoustic devices could enable scientists to better understand ecological communities, more effectively determine what works and what doesn’t work in conservation, and track biodiversity trends.In recognition of the potential of soundscape monitoring, on October 17th Mongabay WildTech is holding a discussion panel with two scientists who have worked extensively with remote sensing tools, including bioacoustic systems:Dr. Zuzana Burivalova, field ecologist at University of Wisconsin, lead author of a 2019 Science paper on bioacoustics, and the lead researcher on Mongabay’s Conservation Effectiveness series.Dr. Matthew McKown, CEO of Conservation Metrics, a company that provides “automated alternatives to historically labor-intensive wildlife survey efforts, combining cutting-edge remote sensing technology, statistical rigor, and extensive scientific expertise to drive down costs and increase the scale and effectiveness of wildlife metrics.”The panel will be moderated by Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler. The Palo Alto Patagonia store is generously hosting the event.Doors open at 7pm for snacks, beverages, and networking. The discussion panel starts at 7:30pm.Space is limited so please RSVP to reserve your spot.Header image: Soundscape visual courtesy of Queensland University of Technologycenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

$65 million deal to protect Congo’s forests raises concerns

first_imgThe Central African Forest Initiative negotiated a deal with the Republic of Congo for $65 million in funding.The aim of the initiative is to protect forest while encouraging economic development.But environmental organizations criticized the timing and the wording of the agreement, which they argue still allows for oil drilling and exploration that could harm peatlands and forest.Two companies in the Republic of Congo recently found oil beneath the peatlands that could nearly triple the Central African country’s daily production. On Sept. 3, the Republic of Congo secured a stream of funding aimed at protecting forests and peatlands.The signatures of French President Emmanuel Macron and Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso finalized a $65 million agreement outlining a set of strategies that the Central African Forest Initiative, or CAFI, which brokered the deal, says will keep ecosystems intact and lock away the carbon they contain.CAFI is a partnership formed in 2015 with the goal of combining forest protection with economic development in the region.https://twitter.com/sletnes/status/1168920504998256643?s=20But not long after the presidents’ pens left the paper, critics began to voice their concern that the deal could pave the way for the destruction of the Republic of Congo’s forests and peatlands. Other agreements in the Central African countries of the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon have led to similar skepticism.The pact “is unlikely to protect any forests,” Simon Counsell, executive director of Rainforest Foundation UK, said in a statement. “It seems that interests other than protecting forests are being served.”In mid-August, two companies from the Republic of Congo announced that the peatlands of the Cuvette Centrale sit atop hundreds of millions of barrels of oil. Extracting it could nearly triple the Republic of Congo’s daily output to almost one million barrels a day, but some experts question whether that figure is exaggerated.The peatlands of the Cuvette Centrale support a wide array of biodiversity, including lowland gorillas. Image by Tereza Mrhálková, ZOO Praha via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0).Scientists first mapped the peatlands, which extend across some 145,500 square kilometers (56,200 square miles) of the Republic of Congo and its neighbor, the Democratic Republic of Congo, in 2017. They figure that the boggy mix of decaying organic matter and forest contains 30 billion metric tons (33 billion tons) of carbon, or about 20 times the amount of carbon emitted from burning fossil fuels in the United States each year.After the discovery, early signs from the Congolese government pointed to their interest in protecting the peatlands. Officials signed the Brazzaville Declaration in March 2018, committing to peatland conservation and enlisting the support of peatland-rich Indonesia in keeping them healthy.“Peatlands have grown over the course of [10,000] years, and they can be destroyed in a matter of days if the land use is not sensitive to the nature of the peatlands,” Tim Christophersen, head of the freshwater, land and climate branch of U.N. Environment, said in a statement at the time.A gorge in the Republic of Congo. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.But in September 2018, the Republic of Congo’s Ministry of Hydrocarbons invited oil companies to bid for the chance to explore for oil in five blocks in the Cuvette Basin. One also encompasses Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park, a well-known national park. The tender drew criticism from Greenpeace.Now, with the recently signed letter of intent, Greenpeace and RFUK are concerned that the language in the agreement leaves the door open for continued oil and natural gas exploration, as well as full-on exploitation.The organizations noted that the text allows for the conversion of high conservation value and high carbon stock forests “in case of the development of infrastructure and extractive industries outside the agro-industrial sector, which are deemed of vital interest to the national economy.” They also point to phrasing that calls for the “minimization” — rather than the outright prohibition — “of direct and indirect impacts of mining and hydrocarbon activities on carbon stocks and forest and peatlands biodiversity.”“They definitely did not produce a letter of intent that is tightly protecting the peatlands or the forest,” Tal Harris, international communications coordinator with Greenpeace Africa, told Mongabay.A spokesperson for CAFI pointed out that some of the oil licenses covering the peatlands date back to the mid-2000s, before the Cuvette peatlands had been mapped. The source said it was unrealistic to think that the government would cancel them. (Crude petroleum accounted for almost half of the value of the Republic of Congo’s exports in 2017, according to the Observatory of Economic Complexity.)Forest elephants also live in the Cuvette peatlands. Image by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters via Wikimedia Commons (Public domain).“We would like the government of the Republic of Congo to say, ‘OK, I will not undertake any activity on this area, and I will withdraw the existing licenses.’ But we are in the real world,” the spokesperson said, adding that canceling existing fossil fuel contracts was “not realistic.”The source also took issue with the characterization of the language in the agreement as “soft.”The spokesperson highlighted the commitments disallowing the conversion of high conservation value and high carbon stock forest for agriculture. The source also said that a major focus of the agreement was to “prevent” the drainage of the peatlands, and it requires that environmental impact studies be carried out before development.“Now, the objective for us as CAFI is to support the country in precisely assessing the risk and to agree on the roadmap to monitor the progress against these commitments they made, including with the ministry in charge of the oil sector and the private sector,” the spokesperson said.Mongabay’s requests for comment on the letter of intent from the Republic of Congo’s Ministry of Hydrocarbons were not answered.“These are strong commitments,” the CAFI spokesperson said. “I’m not saying they’re perfect. I’m just saying that there are no easy solutions.”Banner image of a river in the Congo Basin by Valerius Tygart via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0). John Cannon is a staff writer at Mongabay. Find him on Twitter: @johnccannonEditor’s note: The source from CAFI in this article requested anonymity based on the sensitivity of the issues involved.Citation:Dargie, G. C., Lewis, S. L., Lawson, I. T., Mitchard, E. T. A., Page, S. E., Bocko, Y. E., & Ifo, S. A. (2017). Age, extent and carbon storage of the central Congo Basin peatland complex. Nature, 542, 86. doi:10.1038/nature21048FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Biodiversity, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Offsets, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Carbon, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Green, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Illegal Logging, Logging, Mining, Oil, Oil Drilling, Parks, Peatlands, Poverty Alleviation, Protected Areas, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Redd, Saving Rainforests, Soil Carbon, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Tropical Forests, United Nations Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Amazonian tree with human-sized leaves finally gets ID’d as new species

first_imgBiodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, New Species, Plants, Research, Species Discovery, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation:Melo, E. D., Ferreira, C. A. C., & Gribel, R. (2019). A new species of Coccoloba P. Browne (Polygonaceae) from the Brazilian Amazon with exceptionally large leaves. Acta Amazonica, 49(4), 324-329. doi:10.1590/1809-4392201804771 More than 35 years after it was first seen, researchers have described Coccoloba gigantifolia, a tree species from the Brazilian Amazon with gigantic leaves that can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length.Although C. gigantifolia has been known to the public and the scientific community for a long time, describing it formally and giving it an official name was essential to be able to assess its conservation status and design conservation strategies to protect it, the researchers say.The species is rare and likely has disjointed populations occurring in a rapidly changing landscape, and the researchers recommended listing it as endangered on the IUCN Red List. At the National Institute of Amazonian Research (INPA) in Manaus, Brazil, a framed exhibit of a massive dried leaf has been a local attraction for decades. But the complete identity of the tree it belongs to remained unresolved — until now.Researchers have known that the tree is a species of Coccoloba, a genus of flowering plants that grow in the tropical forests of the Americas. Botanists from INPA first encountered an individual of the unknown Coccoloba tree in 1982 while surveying the Madeira River Basin in the Brazilian Amazon. They spotted more individuals of the plant over subsequent expeditions in the 1980s. But they couldn’t pinpoint the species at the time. The individual trees weren’t bearing any flowers or fruits then, parts that are essential to describing a plant species, and their leaves were too large to dehydrate, press and carry back to INPA. The researchers did take notes and photographs.In 1993, botanists managed to finally collect two large leaves from a tree in the state of Rondônia, which they then framed for public viewing at INPA. “The species became locally famous, but due to the lack of reproductive material it could not be described as a new species for science,” Rogério Gribel, a researcher at INPA, told Mongabay in an email.Coccoloba gigantifolia leaves can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length. Image courtesy of Rogério Gribel.It was more than a decade later, in 2005, that Gribel and his colleague, Carlos Alberto Cid Ferreira, collected some seeds and dying flowers from a tree in Jamari National Forest. Again, these materials weren’t good enough to describe the plant species. So they sowed the seeds at the INPA campus, grew the seedlings, and waited. Their patience bore fruit 13 years later. Literally.In 2018, one of the planted trees flourished and fruited, Gribel said, finally giving them the botanical material they needed to describe the new species.“We are very happy and proud that after the long period of ‘tracking’ such a peculiar and relatively rare species we have finally succeeded in obtaining the flowers and fruits that are the essential structures for describing a new species for science,” he said.Gribel and his colleagues, who described the species in a recent paper published in Acta Amazonica, have named it C. gigantifolia in reference to the plant’s giant leaves.The researchers say that C. gigantifolia, which grows to about 15 meters (49 feet) in height and has leaves that can reach 2.5 meters (8 feet) in length, likely has the largest known leaf among dicotyledonous plants — a large group of flowering plants that include sunflowers, hibiscus, tomatoes and roses. These plants have seeds that can be split into two identical halves, each forming the first two embryonic leaves of the seedling, and their leaves generally have branched veins. The seeds of monocotyledonous plants, by contrast, give out a single embryonic leaf and the grown plants’ leaves have parallel veins, such as those of palm trees, grasses, orchids and bananas.“Comparing leaf size between species is often difficult as there is a large individual variation in leaf size within the same species,” Gribel said. “It is possible that this leadership of Coccoloba gigantifolia will be challenged in the future. For example, species of Gunnera, a genus of wide distribution worldwide, also exhibit huge leaves. But the Gunnera species are not arboreal.”Coccoloba gigantifolia. Image courtesy of Rogério Gribel.Although C. gigantifolia has been known the public and the scientific community for nearly four decades, describing it formally and giving it an official name was an essential step to complete.“A known but undescribed species is like a person without a birth certificate or ID; it is like a person who does not formally have their identity recognized,” Gribel said. “For example, in Brazil there is currently a major effort by the scientific community to catalog the national flora. Although known for many years, Coccoloba gigantifolia could not so far be added to the Brazilian Plant List by the scientists participating of this great initiative.”Coccoloba gigantifolia. Image by Silvestre Silva.Without a formal identity, it’s also difficult to assess the plant’s conservation status. “Initiatives to prevent its extinction are also impaired if the plant has no scientific name,” Gribel said. “Similarly, measures to regulate collection, trade, transport, planting, etc. depend on species recognition as a single taxonomic entity.”With the formal description in place, the researchers say that the species is likely rare and has a high risk of extinction. Individuals of C. gigantifolia have been recorded only from the Madeira River Basin in the Brazilian states of Amazonas and Rondônia — areas currently impacted by infrastructure projects such as hydroelectric dams, roads and expanding agriculture.“The middle and low stretches of the Madeira River still have much of their forest conserved but deforestation has been growing rapidly in these areas especially in northeastern Rondônia and southern Amazonas,” Gribel said. “The Samuel Dam in the Jamari River (and possibly the Santo Antonio and Jirau Dams in the Madeira River) flooded tens of thousands of hectares of forests with Coccoloba gigantifolia and may have negatively affected the populations. The ongoing paving of the BR319 highway will increase deforestation throughout the Middle and Lower Madeira region.”Based on these threats, and on the findings that the species is rare and likely has disjointed populations occurring in a rapidly changing landscape, the authors have recommended listing the species as endangered on the IUCN Red List.Researchers found Coccoloba gigantifolia at two spots close to the Madeira River and BR-319: near Manaus in Amazonas state (inset A) and Porto Velho in Rondônia (inset B). Satellite data from the University of Maryland show that these areas have experienced heavy deforestation over the past couple decades. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Zooming in on the northern site (inset A on the map above) reveals areas of recent forest loss encroaching on the approximate locations where researchers recorded the newly described species. Source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch; Melo et al., 2019.Coccoloba gigantifolia was also recorded in two spots near Porto Velho. The region is part of the so-called “arc of deforestation,” where agricultural expansion has razed much of the rainforest along the underbelly of the Brazilian Amazon. The northernmost of these sites is in an unprotected area that was flooded by the Samuel hydroelectric dam in the 1990s. The other site is located within Jamari National Forest near a wetland (blue inset) that is showing signs of forest loss. Sources: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch; Melo et al., 2019.Satellite imagery shows water levels of the wetland near where Coccoloba gigantifolia was found in Jamari National Forest were far lower in October 2019 than in years past. Source: Planet Labs. Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Coca farms close in on protected areas, isolated tribes in Peruvian Amazon

first_imgA remote region of the Peruvian Amazon is being invaded by farmers who are rapidly clearing mature forests for farms to grow coca.The invasions are occurring in the buffer zone of Alto Purús National Park and two reserves for isolated tribes, seriously threatening the Mashco-Piro, Peru’s largest isolated tribe.The farmers are from VRAEM, Peru’s largest cocaine-producing region, and are part of a growing movement of coca farmers from the Andean foothills to biologically and culturally sensitive lowlands near protected areas.The invasions are occurring in timber concessions and exemplify the problem with Peru’s reliance on timber companies to properly manage remote forests lacking state presence. ATALAYA, Peru — Pascual cuts the motor and our dugout canoe glides below a massive tree trunk suspended a few feet above the river. I motion to the bank.“We want to fly the drone!” I yell over the buzz of chainsaws coming from the opposite bank.“No,” Pascual says, shaking his head. “We can’t stop here … the trees will fall on top of us … and these people are dangerous.”Pascual is Yine, one of a half-dozen tribes that live on the Sepahua River, a tributary of the Urubamba in the remote headwaters of the Peruvian Amazon. He’s the coordinator of the Sepahua vigilance committee, volunteers who help guards protect the buffer zone of Alto Purús National Park. We’ve come to verify rumors of a massive land invasion in the park’s buffer zone, and for the past week Pascual and three other local men have led us up the small river through a patchwork of mature jungle and brand-new clearings. The contrast is striking and disturbing. One moment it feels like the heart of the Amazon. Scarlet macaws fill the sky, and we count tapir and ocelot tracks on the muddy banks. And the next, the trees are gone and the air is full of smoke and ash from the burning fields that surround our boat.Drone photograph of deforestation for agriculture along the Sepahua River, Peru. Photo by Jason Houston/Upper Amazon Conservancy.Pascual pulls the starter cord and the canoe lurches forward. A moment later a tremendous cracking drowns out the motor as another giant tree crashes down the bank and explodes into the river behind us.A new frontier for an illegal industryThe men cutting the trees are from VRAEM, the Valley of Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers, a region notorious for terrorism and as the largest producer of cocaine in Peru. The movement of coca farmers from crowded coca growing places like VRAEM to unpopulated lowlands isn’t new. Coca eradication programs have displaced growers for decades, but nowhere near the scale and speed of what we’re witnessing now. Within a few months, the Sepahua has been transformed from a sleepy frontier town to a bustling hub of outsiders moving up and down the river in large metal boats brought from the city of Atalaya. Local Yine, Asháninka and Amahuaca tribespeople, whose ancestors settled here generations ago, are living in fear as they helplessly watch the forest they depend on disappear.In less than 10 years, Atalaya has gone from a sleepy frontier town to a booming small city driven by logging, agriculture, and, increasingly, coca farming for cocaine production. The completion of the road connecting this strategic town located at the confluence of the Urubamba and Tambo Rivers to the Andes and Lima, was key in its development. Photo by Jason Houston/Upper Amazon Conservancy.Coca leaves are a traditional medicine chewed to relieve hunger and fatigue and to enhance physical performance, as well as for stimulating stomach function, treating asthma, colds, and other ailments. The leaves are sold in many small shops and markets in Peru, especially in the Andes, foothills, and western edge of the Amazon basin. They are also used to make cocaine, which has become a powerful and destructive illegal industry. Atalaya, Peru. Photo by Jason Houston/Upper Amazon Conservancy.But they aren’t the only ones being impacted by the lawlessness. The Sepahua is part of the Purús-Manu Conservation Corridor, a massive 10-million-hectare (25-million-acre) complex of protected areas and indigenous lands twice the size of Costa Rica. This area is one of the most biodiverse places anywhere on the planet, and harbors one of the largest concentrations of isolated peoples. The Sepahua provides access to Alto Purús and Manu national parks and two reserves set aside for the isolated tribes. As the invaders move further upstream toward the protected areas, the territory for some of the world’s last isolated tribes continues to shrink.Our first day on the river we pass the control post for Alto Purús National Park, intended to prevent illegal activities in the buffer zone. The front of the building is covered with termite nests and the surrounding forest has been cut and replaced with partly burnt trees and manioc bushes. It hasn’t been staffed in more than two years and farmers have taken it over. The scene is discouraging and portends the next week on river.The abandoned Alto Purús National Park control post near the new settlement of Santa Isabelle. Sepahua River, Peru. Photo by Jason Houston/Upper Amazon Conservancy.Soon after passing the post, one of our Amahuaca guides points to the riverbank.“Here is where the parcels start.”A large tree has recently been cut to create an opening in the otherwise dense forest perpendicular to the river. “P1” is painted in red on a standing tree next to the clearing, marking this place as Parcel No. 1.Over the next week we count 180 parcels on the right bank and 74 on the left. They’re 100 percent illegal, cut from forest zoned for sustainable and selective logging and divided into timber concessions. Some are spaced 200 meters (650 feet) apart, others 300, and they all extend 1,000 meters deep into the forest, thus covering 20 and 30 hectares (50 to 70 acres), respectively. Not all are occupied, however. Of the 254 parcels, 73 are in some stage of clearing, the fields ranging from 1 to a few hectares. Most have been cut within the past few months, and they appear newer as we move upstream. The last one we find is located less than 10 kilometers (6 miles) from the park boundary.Satellite data showing nearly all of the clearings along the upper stretch of the Sepahua River made between June and November, with recent activity indicating ongoing deforestation. Many clearings have encroached into the buffer zone of Alto Purús National Park. Data source: GLAD/UMD, accessed through Global Forest Watch; satellite imagery from Planet Labs.We don’t see any coca crops along the river, but we didn’t expect to. The coca is grown deeper in the forest, hidden from passing boats, while these riverfront farms are planted with crops like cacao, maize and manioc and reportedly serve as a front to justify the farmers’ presence.The movement of coca farmers from traditional growing areas like the Andean foothills to the lowlands began decades ago but has increased significantly over the past 20 years. Protected areas are often targeted due to their remoteness, arable soil and the lack of government presence. In addition to destroying coca fields, eradication efforts include improved government services and programs to help farmers transition to legal crops like cacao and coffee.  However, a decrease in coffee prices and delays in the process of certifying organic beans is making coffee less profitable and may be causing farmers to abandon coffee and turn back to coca. Furthermore, legal farmers are finding it difficult to grow their crops in areas where coca is still prevalent. In early November, 3,000 cacao- and coffee-farming families in VRAEM demanded the government intervene to prevent chemical contamination from illegal coca plantations that are hindering the certification process for the beans and lowering prices.Despite millions of dollars spent on eradication, the continued robust demand for coca has resulted in continued production. In 2018, Peru cultivated enough coca to produce 509 metric tons of cocaine, a steady increase from the 307 tons it could have produced in 2012, according to U.S. data. Farmers continue to grow coca, but in new, more remote places.last_img read more

Granger’s unilateral decision on GECOM Chair unacceptable

first_imgDear Editor,A statement released by the Ministry of the Presidency on Thursday (October 19, 2017) sought to explain the basis on which President David Granger moved to unilaterally appoint the Chairman of the Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) in the person of retired Justice James Patterson.The statement from the Ministry of the Presidency said: “The Head of State placed reliance on the ruling of the Honourable Chief Justice, Madame Roxanne George-Wiltshire, in the exercise of his decision to reject the third list, dated August 25, 2017, which stated ‘the Proviso to Article 161 (2) which permits the President to act independently to appoint a person of the Judicial category to be the Chairman of GECOM, that is a person who is presumptively fit and proper’.”Yes, the proviso in the Constitution states that if the Leader of the Opposition fails to submit a list, as provided for, then the President can appoint a judge or former judge, or qualified to be a judge in Guyana or the Commonwealth.However, the statement from the Ministry of the Presidency is a blatant misrepresentation of the ruling from the Acting Chief Justice, Roxanne George, in the case of Marcel Gaskin, businessman and brother of Granger’s son-in-law, Dominic Gaskin, vs. the Attorney General of Guyana.The Chief Justice, in her ruling, said: “While the applicant (Gaskin) has not applied for a determination of this issue, it was raised by the Bar Association in its brief, which was filed and served on all parties.“…it does appear to me that failure to submit a list as provided for speaks to the provision of an acceptable list, as discussed earlier. If, by not choosing any of the persons listed, the President thereby finds the list unacceptable, the proviso to Article 161 (2) would apply, and the President should then go on to appoint a judge or former judge, or person who would qualify for appointment as a judge in Guyana or the Commonwealth to the post of Chairman of GECOM.“But all of this in in effect academic, because more than one list has been sought and provided.”The Acting Chief Justice made clear that the President cannot rely on the proviso in the Constitution, because more than one list – a total of 18 names – was submitted by Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo.So how can the Granger-led APNU+AFC Administration expect the Guyanese people to accept the basis he used to make a unilateral decision on an issue as big and as important as the GECOM Chairperson?Regards,Arnold Sanasielast_img read more

Reports – West Ham target wants Rayo Vallecano return

first_img Leo Baptistao in action for Real Betis West Ham target Leo Baptistao wants to return to former club Rayo Vallecano on loan, according to sources in Spain.Atletico Madrid snapped up the Brazilian forward from Rayo last summer after he hit seven league goals during the 2012/13 campaign.The 21-year-old made little impact at the Vicente Calderon, managing only one league start in the first half of last season, before being farmed out to Real Betis.Atleti are expected to send him out on loan again before the close of the transfer window later this month and West Ham, who tried to sign him in January, are thought to be on his trail again after Andy Carroll suffered another long-term injury.But it is believed Baptistao wants to head back to his old club as he bids to get his career back on track.Villarreal and Italian club Genoa are also in the hunt for Baptistao. 1last_img read more

Exclusive – Pellegrini looks ‘shell-shocked’, claims former Man City star

first_imgDennis Tueart believes Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini looks ‘shell-shocked’ – but has backed the Chilean to turn things around at the Etihad.The Blues’ great start to the season has come off the rails somewhat, with a poor performance in the Champions League draw with CSKA Moscow which was then followed up by a Premier League defeat to West Ham and a defeat in the Capital One Cup against Newcastle.And former City star Tueart admits he has seen a change in the 61-year-old demeanour.“I always thought Manuel Pellegrini was very reassured and precise in his post match interviews,” he told the Sports Bar. “But I noticed, after the draw with CSKA Moscow, he was pale, his eyes were big, and he looked shell-shocked.“That was a week and half ago and, in-between that time, we’ve played West ham away, which was a loss, and Newcastle at home which was another defeat. The momentum was always in the right way, now it’s a down.”Former striker Rodney Marsh believes Pellegrini’s time at Man City may be coming to an end, but Tueart claims the ex-Malaga man is the right man for the job.“When you spend fortunes in the market you will have demanding owners and supporters,” he added. “You are always under pressure, it’s how you manage it.“I’m a great believer in stability. When you change things you have to have a better option, what are you going to change it to?”You can listen to live exclusive national radio commentary of Manchester City v Manchester United from 1:30pm on Sunday only on talkSPORTlast_img read more