England finally fire but Australia in charge in Adelaide

first_imgEngland finally got the pink ball to swing on the third night of the second Ashes Test on Monday but it still looked too little, too late and Australia will go into day four on 53 for four with a lead of 268 runs.Australia skipper Steve Smith elected not to enforce the follow-on after the tourists were dismissed for 227, a first-innings deficit of 215, and probably rued his decision as England attacked under the Adelaide Oval lights.James Anderson led the way with the wickets of Cameron Bancroft (four) and Usman Khawaja (20) while Chris Woakes removed David Warner with a delivery that moved off the seam and got an edge to fly to Joe Root in the slips.That the usually free-scoring Warner took 60 balls to eke out 14 runs was an indication of how tough the conditions were and captain could have followed vice-captain in the following over when Smith was given out lbw for a three-ball duck.For the third time in two days, however, Anderson was denied an lbw decision by the DRS system with tracking suggesting the ball had pitched fractionally outside leg.NO REPRIEVESmith only survived to make six runs, though, before he was given out lbw to Woakes and this time there was to be no reprieve from the technology.“We’ve pushed Australia back tonight,” Woakes said. “Australia are obviously still ahead in the game but it was important that we bowled well, showed some character and pushed them back.”Nightwatchman Nathan Lyon survived to the end of the day and will resume with Peter Handscomb. Both were three not out.“We know the night session is toughest to bat, as we saw tonight,” Starc said.“With a lead of 260 going into the day session, we’re in the drivers’ seat. There’s no reason why we can’t build a really big lead and then have England on the ropes in the night session.”Lyon had earlier taken 4-60 as he and the pace trio of Pat Cummins, Starc and Josh Hazlewood combined to humble England’s top order and build on the 442-8 declared the hosts accumulated in their first innings.England, 1-0 down in the five-match series after a 10-wicket defeat in Brisbane, had resumed on 29-1 only to lose James Vince for two in the second over.Desperate for a decent partnership to bolster the top order, expectations were high when Root came out to join Alastair Cook in the middle.Root made just nine before he got a thick edge to a Cummins delivery, however, and Cook departed for 37 prodding at a Lyon tweaker with Smith gobbling up the catch at first slip.Dawid Malan got a life when he successfully referred an lbw decision but made his exit for 19 when he got a bit of glove on another snorter from Cummins soon after England had reached the hundred mark.Woakes and debutant seamer Craig Overton (41 not out) put on 66 for the eighth wicket but once the former departed for 36, the writing was on the wall.Off-spinner Lyon had removed Moeen Ali for 25 with a brilliant leaping catch off his own bowling and Starc followed suit to remove Jonny Bairstow (21) and Woakes, making it three caught and bowleds in a row.last_img read more

Haze from fires, Indonesia’s national ‘embarrassment,’ are back

first_imgBanner image: Smoke rising from a forest fire in Indonesia. During the 2015-16 El Niño, forest fires swept through carbon-rich peat forests, releasing their store of carbon into the atmosphere, and creating a toxic haze that affected as many as 69 million people across the region. Image by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Deforestation, Dry Forests, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Haze, Peatlands, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Southeast Asia Haze, Southeast Asian Haze center_img Indonesia is experiencing its worst annual fire season since 2015, with the cross-border spread of haze once again threatening to spark a diplomatic row with neighbors Malaysia and Singapore.The government has acknowledged that measures adopted in the wake of the 2015 fires to prevent a repeat of that disaster may have fallen short, including efforts to restore drained peatlands and drill wells to provide water for firefighters.President Joko Widodo, scheduled to visit Malaysia and Singapore later this week, says he feels embarrassed by the return of the fires and haze, and has ordered the firing of officials found to have failed to tackle the problem.At the local level, however, governors of the affected provinces appear to be taking the matter lightly: saying the haze isn’t at a worrying level, offering a reward for shamans who can summon rain, and proposing questionable theories about the causes of the fires. Three years after forest fires in Indonesia sent huge volumes of smoke billowing into Malaysia and Singapore, the Southeast Asian neighbors are dealing with a repeat of the “embarrassing” transboundary haze problem.This year’s dry season is expected to be particularly harsh, after a relatively mild interlude since the 2015 fires and haze, due to an El Niño pattern. Indonesia has seen a surge in fires, with 42,740 hectares (105,600 acres) of land burned across the country — double the amount of land burned at this same point last year, and spanning an area two-thirds the size of Singapore.The worst of the fires are in Riau province, on the island of Sumatra, which is experiencing its second dry season of the year. The fires there have razed 27,683 hectares (68,400 acres) since the start of the year, according to data from the Ministry of Environment and Forestry Ministry. The Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG), established by Indonesia’s president in the wake of the 2015 fires to prevent the burning of peat forests, says there are indications the fires this year have been set by commercial concession holders rather than smallholder farmers, given their scale and spread.The resulting haze from the fires has for several days now blanketed large swaths of Riau, including its capital, Pekanbaru. Winds have also spread some of the haze across the Malacca Strait to Malaysia.Affected regions there include Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Putrajaya, Negri Sembilan and Penang, according to the Malaysian Meteorological Department (MetMalaysia).“The haze is caused by a moderate amount of smog moving from hotspots in the central and southern parts of Sumatra due to the Southwest Monsoon winds,” MetMalaysia director-general Jailan Simon said as quoted by The Star newspaper.He said Malaysians would continue to suffer from haze “as long as there are hotspots in Sumatra” due to wind patterns.Singapore is also bracing for haze in the coming days, and has begun issuing its first daily haze advisories of the year. Singapore Foreign Minister Vivian Balakrishnan said in a statement during a recent meeting with his Southeast Asian counterparts that while he noted that there had been relatively no transboundary haze pollution in the last three years in the region, “it remained worrying that the total number of hotspots this year had exceeded that of the same period last year.”“Although good progress had been made in combating transboundary haze pollution, Minister Balakrishnan stressed the need to maintain efforts on that front,” the statement added.Peat fires in Suka Damai village, Rokan Hilir district, Riau, Indonesia, have destroyed palm oil plantations, houses, cars and motorcycles. Image by Zamzami/Mongabay Indonesia.Preventive measuresThe haze from the 2015 fires stoked a diplomatic row between Indonesia and its neighbors, with Vice President Jusuf Kalla criticizing Singapore and Malaysia for complaining about the haze and asking them to be grateful instead for the clean air they enjoyed the rest of the year.But the burning also prompted a raft of policies from President Joko Widodo aimed at preventing future fires, in particular by restoring and conserving peat forests. Draining of these forests’ carbon-rich soil is one of the first steps to clearing the land for planting, but it also renders the peat layer highly combustible.The BRG, also born of these new policies, is in charge of overseeing efforts to block the drainage canals and rewet peatlands. It has also drilled nearly 12,000 wells to provide easily accessible water for firefighting efforts as of 2018.It’s not enough, however, simply to build the infrastructure, says Simon Tay, chair of the Singapore Institute of International Affairs (SIIA), a think tank.“Although the 2019 dry season is shaping up to be more serious than last year, some fire prevention measures on the ground have not been maintained — for example, canal blocks intended to keep peatland wet and fire-resistant have fallen into disrepair,” he said.Pantau Gambut, a coalition of 23 local NGOs that monitor peat protection and restoration efforts, also found through its that peat-rewetting and firefighting infrastructure in some areas weren’t functioning properly. One village in Jambi province, adjacent to Riau, was found to have fire hoses that were too large for the available water pressure, and too short to reach fire-prone areas. In another village in Jambi, a water pump installed there wasn’t powerful enough to provide sufficient water to put out fires.BRG chief Nazir Foead acknowledged that canal-blocking infrastructure built in the past three years needed to be checked again. “Indeed, the construction of canal blocks hasn’t reached all areas that are prone to fires,” he said. “Furthermore, since 2016 we’ve been prioritizing local people to build canal blocks, instead of big contractors, of course using simple technology that can be mastered by the locals.”This year, the agency is allocating 10 percent of its construction budget on maintaining existing infrastructure, Nazir said. He added the agency had detected peatlands drying out at worrying rates in regions vulnerable to peat fires.“At the end of May, the water level in peatlands detected by our monitoring stations started to decline, approaching 0.4 meters [16 inches] below the surface,” he said.To keep peat soils resistant to fire, the water level has to be maintained at or above that level, he said. Any lower and the peat will catch fire easily; once that happens, the fire will be difficult to extinguish, Nazir said.As of July, the average water level at 90 locations monitored by the BRG had dropped below that critical threshold, with peatlands in Riau particularly very dry in the first three weeks of July. In Riau’s Indragiri Hilir district, the water level at some points had dropped to 1.2 meters (47 inches) below ground level.Nazir Foead (left), the chief of the Indonesian Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG), sprays water on peat soils. Image courtesy of BRG.A national ‘embarrassment’With fires already well underway this season, the BRG has ordered its local personnel to work with local communities on checking the drilled wells to ensure they’re ready for use by firefighters. Nazir said 400 wells built two years ago on two villages in Indonesian Borneo had been checked and were now being used to wet peatlands there and extinguish fires.Nazir also said that fire prevention measures in Riau had been effective, as proven by villages that used to experience burning now relatively free of hotspots.“But fires are flaring up in areas that seldom burned [in the past] and indeed they weren’t monitored,” he said.In addition to the preventive measures overseen by the BRG, the government has enlisted police and soldiers to help in the firefighting efforts. It has also declared a state of emergency in six provinces, including Riau, Jambi and South Sumatra, and West Kalimantan, Central Kalimantan and South Kalimantan in Borneo.SIIA’s Tay welcomed the declaration, saying it meant “provincial authorities are calling for more resources to fight the fires at an early stage, before the situation gets out of control.”In Brunei, a two-day meeting of Southeast Asian officials kicked off on Aug. 6 to discuss measures to prevent the transboundary haze from intensifying.“Malaysia will urge member countries to take proactive measures in ensuring forest and peat fires in Asean countries are controlled to prevent the occurrence of transboundary haze,” the Malaysian Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change Ministry said as quoted by the New Straits Times.President Widodo has also ordered urgent action to deal with the fires, including the use of waterbombing helicopters. The president is scheduled to travel to Malaysia and Singapore later this week, and said at a cabinet meeting on Aug. 6 that he felt embarrassed about going now that the haze was a headline issue in those countries. He also said he had ordered the military and police chiefs to fire the officials responsible for failing to tackle the fires.President Joko Widodo speaks in front of the media. Photo courtesy of the Indonesian governmentShamans and sunshineAt the local level, however, officials don’t appear to see the problem as being quite so urgent. Riau Governor Syamsuar said the haze was at an acceptable level, despite the fact that nearly 7,300 residents have reported respiratory ailments as a result of the smog.“No, [the situation is] not worrying yet,” he said as quoted by Kompas.com. “When it gets worrying is when there’s lots of haze.”In South Sumatra, Governor Herman Deru blamed some of the fires on a convoluted quirk of optics.“Let me give an example: There’s a car on a road and then there’s dry land in front of it. The reflection [of the sunlight] from the windscreen could spark fires there,” Herman said as quoted by Merdeka.com. “So don’t think these [fires] are because of negligence or something intentional.”He also said some of the fires were sparked naturally, by branches “rub, rub, rubbing together.”In Central Kalimantan, Governor Sugianto Sabran has offered a reward of $350,000 to any shaman who can summon three days of rain to extinguish the raging fires across the province.“Rather than using helicopters, this [way] is cheaper,” Sugianto said as quoted by Fajar.co.id. “But don’t just make it rain in certain areas, it has to be uniform.”The return of the fires and haze this year coincides with a Supreme Court ruling holding the government, including the president, liable for the 2015 disaster. The government, having been defeated in three courts now, still plans to challenge the latest ruling.The Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi) has blasted this continued refusal to be held to account and take meaningful fire-prevention measures, as demanded by the plaintiffs, that it says could have staved off the disaster that’s currently unfolding.“Amid the environmental emergency that threatens people’s environmental and health rights like now, the Supreme Court’s ruling related to forest fires hasn’t been immediately executed [by the government],” Walhi said in a statement. “Instead, the President filed a challenge. The government’s attempt to challenge the ruling isn’t relevant and hurts people’s hearts amid the fact that hotspots and haze keep increasing in number.”Wahyu A. Perdana, who heads Walhi’s department for food, water and essential ecosystems, also said the president’s statement on pushing investments, including in forest areas and peatland, cast further doubt on the government’s commitment to fighting forest fires.The president last month threatened to “chase” and “beat” anyone hampering investment in the country — a statement that activists say raises the prospect of increased exploitation of Indonesia’s forests. He also ordered the environment minister to “close your eyes” to prevailing regulations when issuing permits for forest concessions.Even Sembiring, Walhi’s head of policy analysis, said the president’s remarks were misguided in light of the current fire and haze episode, given that it was unbridled investment in the country’s forest areas that led to the annual forest fires.“If [the president] is still talking about investments, what else [does he] want to destroy?” he said. “What [he] should talk about is how to fix investments.”The government could start doing that by reviewing the permits already issued to make sure that companies with fires on their concessions are held to account, he said.Eko Cahyono, an agrarian researcher at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), said forest fires remained an annual event in Indonesia because the government never addressed the root of the causes.He said that the majority of land in the country was held by private companies, which either had a financial incentive to use fires to clear the land on the cheap, or else failed to prevent fires on their concessions.“So what’s the root cause of these fires? It’s clear that the hotspots are in companies’ concessions,” Eko said. “But the solution [by the government] is [to improve] the technology, such as firefighting systems. They never want to address the root cause. Do they have the courage to revoke [the permits of] companies with violations?” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Malawi sentences pangolin smugglers, cracks down on wildlife crime

first_imgTwo Malawian nationals arrested in May and suspected of being part of one of Africa’s largest transnational wildlife trafficking syndicates have now been sentenced to three years in prison by a Malawian court.The suspected kingpin of the trafficking network, a Chinese national named Yunhua Lin, was arrested in August this year following a three-month manhunt and is scheduled to appear in court on Sept. 11.Lin’s wife, Qin Hua Zhang, and eight others who had been arrested during the May raids are due in court on Sept. 12, and further hearings have been scheduled throughout the month. In May this year, following multiple joint operations by the Malawi Police Service and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, three Malawian and nine Chinese nationals were arrested in connection with a variety of wildlife crimes. The suspects were charged with offenses including the illegal possession of protected species and their parts, such as live pangolins, pangolin scales, rhino horn, elephant ivory, hippo ivory, multiple protected reptile species, and hardwood timber.Two of the arrested Malawian nationals, Jimmy Mkwelezalemba, 38, and Julius Sanudia, 36, have now been sentenced to three years in prison by a court in Lilongwe, the capital. They were convicted for the possession and smuggling of pangolins. Both men are thought to be part of one of Africa’s largest transnational wildlife trafficking syndicates.The suspected kingpin of the trafficking network, a Chinese national named Yunhua Lin, was also arrested in August this year, following a three-month joint manhunt by the Malawi Police Service and the Department of Parks and Wildlife. He is scheduled to appear in court on Sept. 11.Lin, 46, who has reportedly been linked to a range of wildlife crimes including the possession and smuggling of processed elephant ivory, 103 pieces of rhino horns, two hippo teeth, 556 pangolin scales and three live pangolins, had been on the run following the arrests in May that included his wife, Qin Hua Zhang.Zhang and eight others with connections to the syndicate are due in court Sept. 12. Further hearings have been scheduled throughout the month.“I am delighted to see the Malawian Government making every effort to bring to justice those responsible for trafficking illegal wildlife goods,” Mary Rice, executive director of the Environmental Investigation Agency, said in a statement. “This evil trade drives poaching across Africa, creating a market for banned products. Every gram of rhino horn or shipment of ivory brings us one step closer to wildlife extinction.”Jimmy Mkwelezalemba, left who was convicted on Sept. 9, poses for a photo with suspect Yunhua Lin, who is due in court on Sept. 11. Image by anonymous.Banner image of a ground pangolin (Smutsia temminckii) by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0). Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Green, Ivory, Pangolins, Rhinos, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Oil palm, cattle and coca take a toll on Colombia’s indigenous Jiw

first_imgThey illegally grow oil palm as a monoculture, contributing to water shortages for the area’s indigenous groups.The Jiw indigenous community also has a land dispute with several families who have settled in their territory.The National Land Agency of Colombia has been tasked with resolving the dispute. In the Caño La Sal reservation in central Colombia, the Jiw indigenous community lives on a shrinking amount of land. Several armed groups have begun taking over their territory to grow oil palm and coca and to raise cattle. The residents of Caño La Sal, in Puerto Concordia municipality, Meta department, experience water shortages and food insecurity due to the growth of oil palm as a monoculture.last_img read more

New grouper species discovered in Australian fish market

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Environment, Fish, Genetics, Marine Animals, New Species, Oceans, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife A newly discovered species of grouper almost became someone’s dinner before it could be described to science.Jeff Johnson, an ichthyologist with Australia’s Queensland Museum, had been asked about the fish before, 15 years ago. Over the intervening years, he would occasionally be sent pictures of the same type of grouper, one lacking distinctive features that struck him as a potential new species, but had never found a specimen to examine.Johnson’s big break came in 2017 when a fisherman got in touch and sent along a photo of a grouper, also known as rockcod, that the fisherman was hoping the fish expert could identify. Johnson recognized the fish in the photo as his mystery grouper and asked for the specimens so he could study them, only to be told that the fisherman had already sent the fish to be sold at a local market. But that didn’t stop Johnson from at last getting his hands on a specimen to prove this was an entirely new species. A newly discovered species of grouper almost became someone’s dinner before it could be described to science.Jeff Johnson, an ichthyologist with Australia’s Queensland Museum, had been asked about the fish before, 15 years ago. Over the intervening years, he would occasionally be sent pictures of the same type of grouper, one lacking distinctive features that struck him as a potential new species, but had never found a specimen to examine.Johnson’s big break came in 2017 when a fisherman got in touch and sent along a photo of a grouper, also known as rockcod, that the fisherman was hoping the fish expert could identify. Johnson recognized the fish in the photo as his mystery grouper and asked for the specimen so he could study it, only to be told that the fisherman had already sent the fish to be sold at a local market.This was the same thing Johnson had been told every time he’d been asked about the fish — it had already been sent to market or eaten by the people who caught it before he could get his hands on it. This time, however, Johnson was able to locate the market where the fish were on sale, in a suburb north of Brisbane, the state capital of Queensland, Australia, and ended up buying all five specimens he found there.Epinephelus fuscomarginatus. Photo by Jeff Johnson.“As soon as I saw them, I thought they were probably a new species, so I purchased all five and began the hard work of formally proving they were a new species,” Johnson said in a statement.Part of that hard work included Dr. Jessica Worthington Wilmer, a geneticist at the Queensland Museum, running tests in the museum’s molecular lab. Comparing the results of those tests with related specimens found in the museum’s collections gave the researchers enough evidence to prove that the fish that very nearly became someone’s next meal actually belong to a heretofore unrecognized species.The new species was given the scientific name Epinephelus fuscomarginatus and formally described to science in a study published in the journal Zootaxa last month. It is now one of the more than 90 species in the Epinephelus genus found all over the world.Johnson says E. fuscomarginatus can be found off the central section of the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland at depths of about 220 meters or more than 720 feet.“The fish reaches at least 70 centimetres [28 inches] in length and has been selling in fish markets — I’ve been told they are quite tasty,” he said. “The plain-looking fish, with no real distinctive markings, is typical of most other grouper species and probably explains why it has remained unnoticed and without a name for such a long time.”Queensland Museum ichthyologist Jeff Johnson with a specimen of Epinephelus fuscomarginatus. Photo courtesy of Jeff Johnson.CITATION• Johnson, J. W., & Wilmer, J. W. (2019). Epinephelus fuscomarginatus (Perciformes: Epinephelidae), a new species of grouper from off the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Zootaxa, 4674(3), 329-348. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4674.3.2center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Protecting living corals could help defend the Great Barrier Reef from ocean acidification for decades

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Coral Bleaching, Coral Reefs, Fish, Great Barrier Reef, Impact Of Climate Change, Ocean Acidification, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, UCSC For the first time, researchers have studied the impact of ocean acidification on coral reefs with a device that allows them to increase levels of carbon dioxide on living coral for months at a time.Corals exposed to higher levels of carbon dioxide sustained more damage than those in aquarium experiments because fish, sponges, and other native organisms grazed on the fragile reefs.However, living corals were more resilient than scientists expected, providing a promising buffer against the impacts of climate change. As humans continue to emit record levels of carbon dioxide, we are putting marine habitats at risk. One consequence of these emissions, ocean acidification, is a serious threat to many undersea environments—especially coral reefs.Now, a multinational study on the Great Barrier Reef in Australia offers a small ray of hope. Reefs with higher numbers of living corals will be more resilient than expected to damage from acidifying seawater, scientists reported recently in Nature Evolution and Ecology.A healthy coral reef community on Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef. Photo Credit: Ove Hoegh-Guldberg at Oregon State University on Wikimedia Commons.The ocean absorbs much of the carbon dioxide we put into the air, converting it to a molecule called carbonic acid. This acid makes it harder for corals to recruit the building blocks they need to grow their skeletons. Worse, coral skeletons start to dissolve when seawater becomes too acidic.The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts in one model that the average pH on reefs could drop 0.25 units by 2100. That sounds like a small change, but it could devastate corals.Researchers have previously simulated ocean acidification in simple aquariums, showing that corals struggle to thrive—much less survive—as the acidity in the tank worsens.But David Kline, a staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Ancon, Panama, and first author of the study, wanted to move beyond the “glass box” and look at ocean acidification in a more realistic setting.To do so, Kline and his team placed a series of Free Ocean Carbon Enrichment (FOCE) devices on Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef. Scientists previously had used this technology to study forests and grasslands, but this was its first test on a reef.The FOCE devices at low tide on Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef. Photo Credit David Kline at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.The researchers placed samples of hard coral, both dead and alive, inside the FOCE devices and stationed them in a tidal zone near the island. That put the corals in less than 1 meter (3 feet) of water at low tide and as deep as 5 meters (16 feet) of water at high tide. Openings on two ends and the bottom of the coffee table-sized enclosures left corals exposed to native reef inhabitants, such as parrot fish, invertebrates, and sediment bacteria.By steadily pumping in carbon dioxide, the researchers lowered the pH by 0.25 below the ambient pH of the surrounding reef. Then, they monitored the coral’s growth and dissolution for 200 days. Not only did the living corals slow or completely stop growing, but they did so at a more dramatic rate than the aquarium studies had predicted. That’s because the corals were also nibbled by native creatures that took advantage of their weakened state.But the FOCE experiments did show that living corals are much more resistant to dissolving than dead corals, whose skeletons become the foundations for new corals. Kline and his team calculated that it could take another 50 to 100 years for seawater acidity on the Great Barrier Reef to change enough to dissolve these corals, although the dead corals may already be at risk of disappearing in some regions.Researchers David Kline and Ove Hoegh-Guldberg working on the carbon dioxide distributing system for the FOCE devices. Photo Credit David Kline at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute“The huge difference between the fate of living and dead corals in a natural environment gives me hope,” Kline said in a statement. “As we create marine reserves and learn how to increase the amount of living coral by restoring reefs, we’re setting up a positive feedback loop because living coral will grow the reef and slow dissolution.”“The primary impact of this paper is demonstrating… that healthy reefs stay healthy longer,” said Konrad Hughen, senior scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, who was not involved in the study. “It means that making efforts to preserve corals can have benefits beyond what we think.”Citation:Kline, D. I., Teneva, L., Okamoto, D. K., Schneider, K., Caldeira, K., Miard, T., Chai, A., Marker, M., Dunbar, R. B., Mitchel, B. G., Dove, S., Hoegh-Guldberg, O. (2019). Living coral tissue slows skeletal dissolution related to ocean acidification. Nature ecology & evolution, 3(10), 1438-1444. DOI: 10.1038/s41559-019-0988-xAriana Remmel (@science_ari) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here at https://news.mongabay.com/list/ucsc/. center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Brazil’s Bolsonaro creates Amazon Council and Environmental Police force

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Cattle Ranching, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Finance, Forests, Global Trade, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Illegal Timber Trade, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, International Trade, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Law, Law Enforcement, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Supply Chain, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation Brazil has formed a new Amazon Council headed by Vice President Hamilton Mourão, a retired general and supporter of Amazon mining development. The council will oversee “the activities of all the ministries involved in the protection, defense and development and sustainable development of the Amazon.”A new Environmental Police force is also being created made up of military police from state forces, which will have the potential to put thousands of agents into the field for Amazon operations.Meanwhile, Bolsonaro slashed the budget for IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental enforcement agency, cutting it by 25% as compared to 2019. IBAMA has been recognized internationally for its key role in enforcing Brazil’s laws against illegal loggers and land grabbers, for reducing deforestation and fighting Amazon fires.Critics are concerned over Bolsonaro’s militarization of Amazon environmental, development, and security administration, seeing it as a throwback to the days of Brazil’s military dictatorship from 1964 to 1985, when new highways and other infrastructure projects greatly benefited land grabbers and wealthy landowners. Environment Minister Ricardo Salles (right), pictured in August 2019 with President Jair Bolsonaro. That same month, the Brazil government was heavily criticized for its failure to aggressively fight fires in the Amazon. Image courtesy of Palácio do Planalto.Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro this week announced the creation of an Amazon Council, coordinated by Vice President Hamilton Mourão, a retired general and supporter of Amazon mining development. A new Environmental Police force, utilizing state military police, will also be created. Both actions may have been sparked by escalating international criticism and growing economic problems for the country’s agribusiness sector caused by the leader’s failure to protect the Amazon rainforest.The new Amazon Council, whose exact functions remain vague for now, will oversee “the activities of all the ministries involved in the protection, defense and development, and sustainable development of the Amazon.” Its purview will include the Environment Ministry led by Bolsonaro appointee Ricardo Salles, who spent all of 2019 dismantling the ministry’s capacity to monitor deforestation, enforce environmental laws, and fine offenders; while replacing experienced, qualified staff with retired police officers; and blaming Greenpeace and other NGOs for environmental disasters.Salles — via his unfounded accusations of financial irregularities among NGO recipients — also precipitated the suspension in August of the billion dollar Amazon Fund set up by Norway, Germany and other developed nations to fund firefighting brigades and sustainable projects aimed at reducing deforestation.The new council’s creation may have been sparked by warnings to Bolsonaro before and during this month’s Davos Economic Forum: Large investment fund managers caution that they could be forced to pull out of Brazil, under pressure from shareholders increasingly worried about the climate crisis — especially if the government continues downplaying deforestation in the Amazon while also gutting environmental laws.Brazilian producers and exporters of soy and meat are also very worried about the negative international effects of government environmental policies on their foreign markets. Public concern was especially heightened by last August’s Amazon fires, with consumers in the EU, who demand sustainability, particularly riled. Under Bolsonaro, Brazil has seen the highest Amazon deforestation rate in 11 years, while there is strong evidence that 2019’s fires were set by land grabbers and producers converting rainforest to agribusiness lands.At Davos, Paulo Guedes, Brazil’s Finance Minister, did nothing to help Brazil’s image as he blamed “the poor” for deforestation, “because they want to eat.” He offered no evidence of this claim.Brazil’s Finance Minister Paulo Guedes at Davos, January 2020. Image by Valter Campanato / Agencia Brasil.Like nearly all of this government’s Amazon initiatives, the Council’s creation came from inside the presidential palace, and without consulting concerned parties, including local governments, ministries, NGOs, and scientists. As he did during the Amazon fire crisis, Bolsonaro is once again calling on the military to sort things out: Vice President Mourão’s key qualification as Council leader seems to not be knowledge of environmental issues, but his five years spent serving as army commander of the Amazon region.The decision to resort to the military to deal with the Amazon has caused dismay among experts, including Suely Araújo, who headed IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental enforcement agency, until forced out by Salles last year. “[T]he solution is not in militarizing environmental policy,” she said. “[M]ilitary support for operations in critical areas might be necessary, but it should be understood that environmental monitoring has to go way beyond troops on the ground.” Meanwhile, Bolsonaro’s 2020 budget for IBAMA forest monitoring across Brazil has been slashed by 25% as compared to 2019.Critics warn that the military-led council harks back to the command structure during Brazil’s military dictatorship from 1964-1985, when large infrastructure projects like the Transamazon Highway were built in the name of development and national security, but became vectors for deforestation that benefited land grabbers and big landowners.Brazilian Vice President and leader of the newly announced Amazon Council Hamilton Mourão. He has no environmental credentials but served as the military commander over the Amazon region for five years. Image by Gabriel Cruz on flickr.Mourão, critics note, is no environmentalist. He strongly supports potash mining within and immediately adjacent to the territory of the Mura indigenous people; he also sees indigenous communities as obstacles to economic development. Mourão is on record saying, “Indians are indolent.”This view of indigenous peoples was reinforced by Bolsonaro this week when he declared that “Indians are evolving and more and more are becoming human beings like us.” The President is currently pushing a bill in Congress that would undo constitutional protections and allow industrial mining within indigenous reserves.André Guimarães, director of IPAM, the Institute for Amazon Research, is optimistic about the new council, but emphasised the need for long term environmental commitment: “We understand the council will unite public policies; that’s important… but as people who work in the Amazon, we hope these policies will be effective and continuous, because long term action is needed.”In addition to the council, a new national Environmental Police force is being created “for the protection of the Amazon environment,” in the words of Environment Minister Salles. It will be made up of military police personnel from state forces and has the potential to bring together thousands of agents for Amazon operations.General Mourão says the purpose of the Amazon Council is to make the government more proactive in the region, and so help Brazil attract more investment. He expects the council to begin work in March, once it has recruited staff and organized its activities.It will be funded with R$1 billion (US$250 million) confiscated, or paid in fines, to the Lava Jato anti-corruption operation, money the Supreme Court decided should be used in the “prevention, monitoring, and combat[ting] against deforestation, forest fires and environmental crimes in the Amazon region.” Just under half has been allocated to the nine states that make up the Amazon region, leaving the rest for the new council. Had the money been invested in IBAMA, say critics, it would have allowed the agency to carry out operations against illegal loggers and land grabbers as it did efficiently in the past. How the funds will be used by Mourão’s council remains to be seen.Banner image caption: Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. Photo credit: jeso.carneiro on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Arsenal ready to trigger Fabregas option

first_img0Shares0000LONDON, England, July 11- Arsenal are manoeuvring themselves into a position to bring Cesc Fabregas back to north London this summer the Daily Mail reports.The former Gunners skipper is currently on his summer holidays following Spain’s Confederations Cup campaign and is pondering his future after a frustrating season at Barcelona. Publicly, the Spaniard maintains he wants to stay at the Nou Camp, but doubts over how he fits into manager Tito Vilanova’s plans after being regularly overlooked for big games last season has left Fabregas in two minds.And the Gunners are poised to strike should the midfielder decide his future lies elsewhere with the Emirates Stadium club being kept updated on developments regarding the 26-year-old’s future as the summer progresses.A deal to re-sign Fabregas will be relatively straightforward to conclude. As part of the deal that took Fabregas back to Spain, Arsenal secured a £25million first-option clause as part of the transfer.Should Barca decide to sell Fabregas, the Gunners would have first refusal on the midfielder at a fixed price of £25million.Even if Fabregas decides he wants to return to London, Barca will be hesitant to let him leave given the work the Catalan club put in to bringing him back to Spain – but Arsenal will be at the front of the queue should that eventuality occur.Meanwhile, the Gunners are stepping up their interest in Swansea defender Ashley Williams following Thomas Vermaelen’s back injury.The Wales international is a key target for Arsene Wenger this summer, but Arsenal have baulked at the central-defender’s £10million asking price.Captain Vermaelen is likely to miss the start of the season due to the recurrence of a lower back problem, leaving the Gunners with just two fit senior centre-halves; Laurent Koscielny and Per Mertesacker.– By Daily Mail0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

No Fenerbahce move for RvP- Agent

first_imgHowever, Kees Vos, Van Persie’s representative, denied that this was the case and said that the 31-year-old would report for pre-season training as expected.“If Robin had found a new club, we would have announced it. And I’m in the Netherlands right now,” Voss told Voetbal International.“All I can say that Robin will simply report at Manchester United for the first training session.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000LONDON, July 6- Robin van Persie’s agent has downplayed speculation that his client has already agreed to join Turkish side Fenerbahce this off-season.Reports surfaced over the weekend that Manchester United had made the Dutchman available for transfer, while the player had supposedly agreed personal terms with the Super Lig outfit.last_img read more

REJECTED! West Ham failed with €50m bid for Lacazette, says Lyon president

first_imgWest Ham failed with a bid of over £40million for Lyon striker Alexandre Lacazette earlier this summer, the French club’s president has said.A bid of €50million [£42.7million] was tabled by the Hammers according to Jean-Michel Aulas.However Lyon refused the offer, Aulas told French broadcaster SFR Sport, just as he announced in July that Arsenal had seen a bid for the France international rejected.Aulas said in a studio interview: “We’ve refused an offer of €50million from West Ham for Alexandre Lacazette. We’ve even turned down more for him.”Lacazette, 25, has been a consistently productive goalscorer in France’s Ligue 1 for the past three years, earning ten caps for Les Bleus in that time.West Ham boss Slaven Bilic lost Andy Carroll to injury early this season, and new signing Andre Ayew joined him on the sidelines after suffering a thigh blow in his club debut.The London Stadium outfit brought in another forward on Sunday as they confirmed the arrival of Italy international Simone Zaza on a season-long loan from Juventus. 1 Lyon have been determined to keep hold of Alexandre Lacazette this summer last_img read more